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First homebrew pale ale kit yesyerday

Discussion in 'Homebrewing' started by psnydez86, Mar 5, 2012.

  1. Just did my first extract/steeped grains kit from midwest.....using the bucket with air lock as primary....do I have to take the lid off to make sure a good fermentation begins? Also I keep the cap on the airlock right?
  2. VikeMan

    VikeMan Advocate (740) Pennsylvania Jul 12, 2009

    No, leave the lid on. And leave the cap on. Open the lid after a couple weeks and check your gravity. Then again three days later. If it hasn't moved and is in the ballpark of what you were expecting, attenuation is done. At that point, leave it in the fermenter for a few more days to clean up, then bottle.
  3. scurvy311

    scurvy311 Savant (355) Louisiana Dec 3, 2005

    Also, add a spigot to your bucket(s). It makes gravity samples and bottling much easier. Just don't forget to take out the airlock before you draw a sample. That was the first customization i made to the brew buckets I purchased from my LHBS. It's by no means necessary, but I think it will make it more convenient.
  4. The instructions is to put it in a secondary carboy in 2 weeks for 2 weeks, then to my bottling bucket with spigot, then bottle and let it csrbonate for 2 weeks
  5. Actually those instructions are optional....if doing single stage it says check gravity after 5-7 days in primary and if its constant over 3 days of checking it you can let it sit for a few more days then bottle....is doing a secondary better results?
  6. bwiechmann

    bwiechmann Savant (300) Minnesota Nov 30, 2009

    The debate over whether or not to use a secondary has raged forever and doesn't show any signs of slowing. If it's your first brew, I'd recommend leaving it in primary for about 2 weeks, then checking gravity 3 days apart, and then leaving it for another week or so for everything to clean up, and then bottle (as Vikeman stated). Keep it simple on the first one and then later you can start playing around with the secondary to see if you like the end result better.


    More than anything though- and this is the hardest part of brewing- be patient. Rushing your first homebrew can lead to disappointment and discouragement. Give the yeast time to do their magic.

    edit: Also- congrats on the first brew!
  7. Sounds great! Thanks everyone for the much needed advice!

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