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Late yeast addition

Discussion in 'Homebrewing' started by brewrouse, Dec 22, 2012.

  1. brewrouse

    brewrouse Zealot (90) Minnesota Jan 28, 2010

    Give me some thoughts on this. I am brewing a IIPA - using the same recipe I did last time I made it. I achieved a 1.116 OG and 1.024 FG. Comes out to around 12.5% beer. It was still a bit "sugary" and I want to do it again, but dry it out a bit - looking for a 1.012-1.010. Problem is the yeasts (WL001,WL007) I used are "terminal" at this %. What about adding a WL099 or WL090 (San Diego) after initial fermentation slows. I have used the WL099 as a primary yeast and did not like the results - lots of off-flavors I do not want.
    Anyone done this kind of "late" yeast addition, and would you make a starter with the higher tolerant yeast?
  2. MrOH

    MrOH Savant (440) Maryland Jul 5, 2010

    you could alway try a starter of 3711 after a week. Shouldn't throw off much flavor that late in the game.
  3. NiceFly

    NiceFly Savant (375) Tajikistan Dec 22, 2011

    I have been thinking about this myself.

    I plan on using Champagne yeast, but that may not be the best choice for you. I just want to make sure all the simple sugars are fermented after using a low attenuating yeast. You want a yeast that will continue above and beyond on the more complex sugars. 3711 certainly fits that bill! Plus any flavor from 3711 will likely be blown out in a big IIPA.

    The procedure I plan on using is making a starter for the 2nd yeast and cold crashing. Then when I am ready to pitch I will decant the old starter wort and add a few hundred ml of new starter wort and let it get going. When I see some decent activity, or it threatens to crawl out of the flask, I will pitch it. That way the yeast are at their best when I put them into the somewhat hostile environment of a nearly finished big beer.
    inchrisin likes this.

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