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Suggestions for a new beer drinker

Discussion in 'Beer Talk' started by shaneschommer, Dec 12, 2012.

  1. shaneschommer

    shaneschommer Initiate (15) Dec 11, 2012

    Just turned 21 two months ago. My friend got me into craft beer and I avoid the big three at all costs. My main problem is IPA's. I find most of them much too bitter for my taste. I imagine this is because im a new drinker. Although I really enjoy 90 minute from dogfish head. What are some good beers that aren't too bitter? and any beers to try in general. I also really liked Founders Dirty Bastard and plan on trying their breakfast stout next.
  2. 90 minute has a lot of malt in it so it's no surprise you like that if you aren't into the bitter component of most IPA's. Stouts / porters or saisons may be more to your liking.
  3. jplopez21

    jplopez21 Advocate (550) Illinois Nov 14, 2012

    Seems to me that u like more maltier beers and wouldnt really be into IPA's. I'd go for more Belgian Ales, and Scottish Ales, then eventually work ur way up to Imperial Stouts.
  4. mychalg9

    mychalg9 Advocate (700) Illinois Apr 8, 2010

    Dont worry about IPA's yet, if you dont like them now you may never, or you will eventually come around to them (more likely). Right now just focus on styles you like...if you like Dirty Bastard try an Oskar Blues Old Chub, for example. Once you find a style or two you know that you like, try as many different breweries' take on it. Or just jump right in and get mixed six packs of a bunch of random stuff. THe main point is to have fun trying different beers.
  5. djaeon

    djaeon Advocate (725) California Oct 2, 2006

    As far as IPA's go, Pliny The Elder is great. Well balanced. All that. But IPA's are an acquired taste (they were for me, anyway). My best advice, keep trying different styles. And just because one brewery's version of a specific style might not taste good to you, doesn't mean the next brewery you try that style from won't taste great to you. Drink beers that you enjoy, and trust that your taste will change and grow with time. Don't try to force yourself to like something because it has a lot of hype surrounding it. Don't blow past year round releases and go straight for limited one-off's. Year round releases are often the most solid beers a brewery makes, and will give you something to keep coming back to when the limited beers leave you disappointed.
  6. loafinaround

    loafinaround Savant (370) New York Jul 16, 2011

    Just go to a shop that breaks-up packs and get a variety of well rated samples of different varieties. Even if they're not spot-on for your palate, you'll get an idea of what general brew types you prefer....
    TWStandley likes this.
  7. Fer shits and giggles try Anchor Liberty Ale- it's a classic tasty brew that can be seen as a precursor to modern-day IPAs, but is also more balanced. It just might get your foot in the door, especially if it's already nudged in there a bit with the 90 Min.

    Also- don't drink beers that lean on the bitter-side straight out of the fridge; serving them too cold only accentuates the bitterness and suppresses the other balancing elements.

    On the malty side I love Old Chub as well, but maybe try some malty lagers like the Munich Dunkel and Bock families. The well-made ones are quite rich and complex in their own right. You can search styles here on BA- but my faves are Ayinger Celebrator, Spaten Optimator, Einbecker Ur-Bock, and Ayinger Altbairisch.

    Cheers, and welcome to the endless pursuit!
    CurtFromHershey likes this.
  8. basscram

    basscram Savant (355) Florida Mar 29, 2006

    Don't forget the great lagers of Europe and America!
  9. draheim

    draheim Poobah (1,025) Washington Sep 18, 2010

    Two Hearted. The most balanced IPA you'll find.
    BrownAleMale likes this.
  10. mrcraft

    mrcraft Advocate (605) California Dec 15, 2012

    My first time trying an IPA, I found the bitterness off-putting. I'm still not a big fan of IPAs, but I found Full Sail IPA and Bear Republic Racer 5 IPA to my liking.
  11. beercanman

    beercanman Savant (485) Ohio Dec 17, 2012

    Try several different styles as mentioned above. SN was my gateway into craft. I would try SNs entire line as well as founders. Find a bottle shop so you can get singles.
  12. Not sure where you're located - but I'd recommend Deschutes Mirror Pond Ale
  13. WesM63

    WesM63 Advocate (640) Ohio Nov 6, 2011

    Everyone is different.

    If you like 90 minute and Dirty Bastard, the suggestion would be to try other beers within the same realm. IPA's are and acquired taste. Personally, I tried hopslam last year and was hooked, even after trying various other IPA's (Two Hearted, etc). After going back, I enjoyed them more.

    At any rate, as others mentioned, go to your local bottle shop, ask around, get a mix-a-six and enjoy.
    BrownAleMale likes this.
  14. PtE is not a balanced beer, it's hop forward. (An amazing beer, I agree.)
  15. lsummers

    lsummers Advocate (535) California Jun 21, 2010

    Rogue's Maple Bacon Ale. (hehe)

    But no! Try some Dead Guy ale. Although sounds like you've had much more flavorful beers than that. Maybe try some Green Flash West Coast IPA, and if that's not available, try some Smuttynose Ipa. :)
  16. the really hoppy stuff does tend to be an acquired taste for many. i second the belgian ales suggestion. chimay blue is a very approachable belgian strong dark, then maybe pick up a rochefort 8. try some tripels and strong pales. la fin du monde, duvel, and brooklyn local 1 are all very tasty. try out a saison. then sample some stouts. later on take another stab at some IPAs/DIPAs and see how/if your opinion has changed. the point is to experiment. get going, you have a lot of drinking to do!
  17. IPA's aren't the only hoppy style out there and some styles blur the lines when it comes to bitterness. Do you have any good craft beer bars in your area? If so, describe your palate to the bartender and they can steer you in the appropriate direction; the great thing is most will give you a sample first as opposed to buying an entire pint or bottle.
  18. good point about location. OP - you might want to let us know where you are so recommendations can be tailored to what's available in your area. if i'm in new england it's not going to help me a whole lot having people go on about russian river, alpine, and surly.
    BoUrBoNbArReL likes this.
  19. MattSweatshirt

    MattSweatshirt Advocate (645) Texas Jun 29, 2011

    Try the Houblon Chouffe for a hop forward type of beer you probably haven't had before.
  20. Bonis

    Bonis Savant (410) Ohio Jul 28, 2010

    If you go for the Breakfast Stout, it is excellent but is very big and has a strong coffee and chocolate flavor. I didn't like my first FBS, but now it is one of my favorite brews. Then again, I love imperial stouts.

    As for recommendations, definitely go for some doppelbocks. Celebrator, Salvator, Korbinian, and Troeganator (a good American brewed doppelbock). Also, have you tried any spiced beers? Winter warmers are good this time of year, some are a little strong but there is normally little to no bitterness.

    Belgians were my gateway into craft beer. I found American beers too offensive at first, with all the rich maltiness and super hoppy bitterness (now I love it all). There are many Belgian ales that stand up to the best in the world. Many are very yeasty and spicy, the dark ales have a signature raisin/plum-like fruit flavor. Just start purchasing one or 2 at a time. You may enjoy them! Take a look at the top beers in Belgium. You will see a lot of sours.. ignore those for the time being (as you progress into beer, you may end up getting into these), but there are many others that are amazing!
    http://beeradvocate.com/lists/top-be
    Edit: Not the cheapest of beers... :(
  21. I recommend this every day, but Anchor Steam. A nice balance between malt and hops.

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