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Weissbier. Does anything else compare?

Discussion in 'Beer Talk' started by iseethewhitewhale, Jan 26, 2013.

  1. Domingo

    Domingo Champion (945) Colorado Apr 23, 2005

    That one and Hopfen-Weiss (which started as a collaboration between Schneider and Brooklyn) are both going to appeal to IPA fans as much as normal wheat beer fans...or so I would guess. I can't recall if this is 100% fact, but I think Edel-Weiss was originally brewed for export only. On my last trip to Germany the Weissesbrauhaus carried both MG and Hopfen, but with a decent crowd my wife and I were the only ones drinking either of them.
    Crusader likes this.
  2. BA biboergosum states in his review:

    “500ml bottle - still called 'George Schneider's Wiesen Edel-Weisse' on the newly arrived product in Alberta. Purity Law of 1516, blah, blah, blah, Cascade hops. Wait, what?”

    Using Cascade hops in a solely German made Hefeweizen is “crazy”!?!;)

    Cheers!
    Crusader likes this.
  3. Never been to Germany. id absolutely try every one of them! Why not?
  4. steveh

    steveh Advocate (705) Illinois Oct 8, 2003

    Because they sound repulsive? To me anyway. I remember the first time I saw a Diesel (Helles and Cola), the look on my face made the drinker laugh from far across the Bierhall. Radler isn't bad, but it seems a waste of good beer.

    Bananas mushed into my beer? Not this long-time beer lover.
  5. steveh

    steveh Advocate (705) Illinois Oct 8, 2003

    How long have these vile concoctions been "en vogue?" I sure don't remember them on any menus during my last visit.
  6. Not mushed but mixed with banana juice.
  7. steveh

    steveh Advocate (705) Illinois Oct 8, 2003

    And this is better... how? :D
  8. Dude...I don't know. Germans are weird.
  9. steveh

    steveh Advocate (705) Illinois Oct 8, 2003

    Hah! We're all weird -- who else would put an orange on an ersatz Wit beer? Or lime juice in a light lager? :D
    sergeantstogie likes this.
  10. +1 for Sierra Nevada Kellerweis and also Brooklyner Weisse if you'd like to try American. Very true to tradition.

    Many great German Wheats... Hacker-Pschorr and Julius Echter both come to mind. And Schneider.
    Somebody mentioned Vitus. Yes! Weizenbocks are great. Ayinger is a good house too.
  11. i live in europe and would not expect any similarities, apart from the fact both are made of wheat, bavarian and berliner are two distinct styles of wheatbeer
  12. i suppose it is a semantic quibble then. as steveh noted above, "not noticeable" seems these days to be in comparison with hop bombs.
  13. I don’t know about “semantic quibble’?

    When I homebrew a German Hefeweizen I only add a little bit of bittering hops; about 4 AAUs worth. I make no flavor or aroma additions. I do use Noble Hops for my bittering addition but you can’t recognize any flavor from them.

    Below is from a BYO article on German wheat beers:

    “Since the flavors in wheat beer are primarily derived from the wheat and the yeast strains, hops are not a major flavor or aroma component. The hops used in hefe-weizen are there to balance the malt and nothing more. Bitterness levels are usually low, and hop flavor and aroma should be low or nonexistent to allow the spiciness of the wheat and yeast to come through unobstructed.”

    There does seem that there are German brewed Hefeweizen beers that are different from a ‘standard’ Hefeweizen; you pointed out Schneider Edel-Weisse Mein Gruner as an example of this. The Edel-Weisse Mein Gruner uses Cascade hops which is very non-standard.

    Cheers!
  14. well, i can always pick out noble hops from newly-arrived bottles of weihenstephaner. SN kellerweiss too.
  15. Well, you are a ‘better’ man than me since Sierra Nevada Kellerwies is solely hopped with bittering hops and they are not Noble hops:

    “Ingredients
    Yeast Hefeweizen ale yeast
    Bittering Hops Perle or Sterling
    Malts Two-row Pale, Wheat, Munich”

    Cheers!
  16. change what i said to just general european hop cultivars, then. my intention was to point out how i could still pick out earthy and grassy/leafy/herbal notes, more characteristic of european varieties, and of course some bitterness.
  17. Stahlsturm

    Stahlsturm Savant (420) Germany Mar 21, 2005

    Just because it's not my favourite style doesn't mean I wouldn't drink it should it happen to float my way... :p
  18. Stahlsturm

    Stahlsturm Savant (420) Germany Mar 21, 2005

    That's because you wouldn't go to bars that young people frequent. The mentioned abominations and even worse stuff (Like "Schneeweizen" which is wheat beer with a glob of vanilla ice cream in it...) are readily available all over the place.

    I report this in a state of profound somber sadness and would really like to blanket this matter (in the darkest pit of Hell preferably...) but truth is truth and must stay truth. *sighs*
    devlishdamsel likes this.
  19. steveh

    steveh Advocate (705) Illinois Oct 8, 2003

    Well, that's a new one to me -- tastes changing? ;)
  20. Surely if you are in Australia then Matilda Bay Redback is a good one to check out, at least it should be fresher (Apologies if it has been suggested already).
  21. steveh

    steveh Advocate (705) Illinois Oct 8, 2003

    People always seem to think "balance" negates any character from the balancing agent, not for me. Maybe because I know what I'm looking for, but I don't think there's any reason to apologize for being able to discern flavor others may not.

    My favorite hop for bittering my Hefeweizen was always Tettnang -- call me a rebel.
    tai4ji2x likes this.
  22. Stahlsturm

    Stahlsturm Savant (420) Germany Mar 21, 2005

    I doubt that very much.
  23. steveh

    steveh Advocate (705) Illinois Oct 8, 2003

    Okay, I'm sorry -- I just lost interest when the guy acted so surprised that Weihenstephaner is the oldest brewery in the world. This guy's a goof.
    tai4ji2x likes this.

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