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Weyermann-Bamberg video experimental beers

Discussion in 'Germany' started by herrburgess, Jan 23, 2013.

  1. A report from the Bayerischer Rundfunk about Weyermann's specialty malts and beers. A good display of both the type of experimentation going on in Germany -- as well as the type of skepticism said experimentation is met with ;)

    Robert_N and boddhitree like this.
  2. Have you tried any of them? I was left seriously wondering if their brewer had ever actually tried the style he was experimenting with. Though, I think it is a huge step towards loosening up the opinions of non-traditional styles for Germany. Come to think of it, this is probably exactly how you feel about American brewers making German lagers.
  3. mjtierney2

    mjtierney2 Savant (445) Germany Jul 31, 2011

    That reporter's reactions are classic. How many times did she use the word "crazy"? I lost count...
  4. Yes, IMO the large majority of Weyermann's experimental beers are about as good as American brewers' takes on German lagers. A shame, really, as their setup is incredibly cool, and they could potentially produce some excellent stuff. I actually liked the Suessholz lager and porter. All of the others were, sadly, pretty poor.
  5. boddhitree

    boddhitree Advocate (610) Germany Apr 13, 2008

    I remember having a Weyermann produced Raspberry Weizen (or something with Raspberry) at the Festival der Bierkulturen 2011 (or 2010) [memory isn't what is was]. Though I don't remember the exact year, I do remember being extremely disappointed in the product. It was thin and didn't incorporate the raspberry taste very well. Basically, it was disjointed, as if they'd said, we need SOMETHING for this festival, what can we whip up? I wasn't the only one to comment being disappointed at their offering. Couldn't just be because a German was trying something unusual because I've had good attempts at using fruit from other brewers at the Festival der Bierkulturen in other years. In my opinion, Weyemann should stick with malting, but brewing isn't their strong point.
  6. Stahlsturm

    Stahlsturm Savant (420) Germany Mar 21, 2005

    That was likely her way of trying to underline how unusual this was. Reporters always blow things out of proportion to make "their" news more interesting than others.
  7. boddhitree

    boddhitree Advocate (610) Germany Apr 13, 2008

    I hate that the reporter keeps intoning "this is NOT beer" because "it's not RHG." Absolutely idiotic. That's one of the things that really makes me fuming mad, the mindset that RHG = beer, vs. non-RHG = not beer. And then they call it a Malzgetränk, or "malt-drink." This goddamn obsession with the RHG and it's use in brainwashing/marketing is a major reason for the decline of beer in Germany and the Brauereiausterben, causing not only a myopic view of what is, but it's just downright prejudiced and in a beer-way kind of like being racist.
  8. Stahlsturm

    Stahlsturm Savant (420) Germany Mar 21, 2005


    When they say "This is not beer" they mean to say "This is not beer as we know it and it scares the bejeesus out of us". You need to see this in a greater historical context.

    The RHG has been blanketing Germany since 1900 (I think). By 1945 this already was engrained in every Germans mind that RHG = beer, Not RHG = poison from abroad. Since 1945 beer (thought of synonymously with RHG) has been pretty much the only thing German we were allowed to (or allowed ourselves to, depending on your viewpoint) be proud of. I think at least some of our desperate clinging to the RHG comes from there.

    And do not dismiss this matter lightly, Germany has suffered a massive inferiority complex for at least 5 centuries now and the fact that our ancestors so gloriously ran our "Second Reich" in the ground in WW I and the things happening since have left a lasting imprint on our soul as a people.
    steveh likes this.
  9. boddhitree

    boddhitree Advocate (610) Germany Apr 13, 2008

    Substitute a few words in the above sentence and you'll understand how racist it sounds.
    Considering Germany's history, it's sad that it's still ok to be "beerist-racist."
    I'm not implying to you, Stahlsturm, that you're rude, racist, or any of the other things I said above, just that this mindset is. It's one thing to say, "I don't like something because it's not my taste," but it's the height of intolerance to de-legitimize another's likes by simply refusing to acknowledge them being in the same category as the other.

    I think you make my point for me. First, it's sad that Germans were brainwashed in school up until just recently to hate their own country/anthem/flag/etc and feel disgusted when they felt even a little proud of their own country and heritage. Luckily, the World Cup 2006 was the cathartic moment that helped German's begin to overcome that. And you're right, beer has been one of the few things Germans could use to de-legitimize things foreign.

    Again, change up a few words, and presto... taboo ideas.
    History is destiny, but it doesn't mean we can't evolve and call BS when we see it.

    We can say a beer is not RHG-mässig, follows the RHG, but we can't dismiss a beer as not being beer!
    sergeantstogie likes this.
  10. Stahlsturm

    Stahlsturm Savant (420) Germany Mar 21, 2005

    First, the term "racist" is entirely inappropriate. We're talking about beer here, not humans. Then, I'm not defending this "beer xenophobic" position, I've had too many very drinkable non RHG beers in my life.

    What I was attempting with my above post was an explanation just why Germans are so damn mule-headed about this RHG matter, despite a bazillion reasons for the contrary. In the German mindset "beer" and RHG are SYNONYMOUS. I'm not saying that's good or bad, I'm not discussing it, I state a fact that you need to be aware of when talking to an average German. To most of us, trying to take away the RHG (as the legal embodiment of one of the few things we dare being proud of) is like the NRA would react when you send the National Guard to collect all private guns. OUTRAGE doesn't even begin to describe it.

    I understand all your argument above but this is the WAY wrong language if you ever want to get anywhere with this discussion with regular Germans.
    drtth and boddhitree like this.
  11. boddhitree

    boddhitree Advocate (610) Germany Apr 13, 2008

    You have a good point. Please exchange the word "racist" with "xenophobic."
    I see your point. Still don't mean it ain't right to be xenophobic or racist.

    Actually, being provocative is a way to really get a discussion going, and that's always been my main aim here at BA. Thanks, Stahlsturm, for participating in this spirit.
  12. I agree with Boddhitree. So many things lie just under the dusty surface of things said in Germany. So many topics are considered taboo yet mention something ever so slightly removed from that taboo and the 'ol veil comes off pretty quick.
    boddhitree likes this.
  13. mjtierney2

    mjtierney2 Savant (445) Germany Jul 31, 2011

    I agree with Stahlsturm. No need to make this about anything besides beer. There are jerks in America, too.
  14. I'm with Stahlsturm here, too. This is about semantics, not eugenics.
  15. To get back to the subject at hand...more experimental beers -- this time using Weyermann's malt but not their Braumeister. Anybody tried BrauKunst? (name sounds awfully familiar)

  16. boddhitree

    boddhitree Advocate (610) Germany Apr 13, 2008

    See this video saves me the time of ever visiting another brewery. A great 3 minute tour.
  17. Stahlsturm

    Stahlsturm Savant (420) Germany Mar 21, 2005

    Of course neither is right. It's still there and it stems from fear. I was explaining where that fear in Germans comes from. I'm certain this will seem paranoid and completely irrational to non-Germans but it is what it is and, when trying to convince someone you need to know where that person comes from and what hidden tripwires you may set off. As some of you already know, I work in a psychiatric hospital for my "civilian job" so I have possibly more insight into this than others.

    Well, you won't find that many Germans who can discuss / provoke / argue in English on the necessary level around here. I guess so far I managed to hold my own :D
  18. Stahlsturm

    Stahlsturm Savant (420) Germany Mar 21, 2005

    [tinfoil hat mode] They are everywhere man, I tell you, EVER-Y-WHERE ! [/tinfoil hat mode]
  19. Stahlsturm

    Stahlsturm Savant (420) Germany Mar 21, 2005

    If you want to deepen this (I'm actually not sure what you're on to...) I'm open to PMs :)
    sergeantstogie likes this.
  20. Naa no need to. Herrburgess is right. Let's keep it about beer. None of what I said or anyone else said takes away from the fact I love Germany and miss it like crazy and have grown immensely in my love for their beers.
    mjtierney2 likes this.
  21. boddhitree

    boddhitree Advocate (610) Germany Apr 13, 2008

    Psych. You have my respect and admiration that you work there. I appreciate trying to fill us in to an aspect of how beer and culture intertwine. However, I guess I get my this "combative" nature from my mom's (from FFM area) family, where, for example, my Oma and her 2 sisters could argue simultaneously at full voice a) without seeming to breathe, and 2) hearing and understanding what the other said without ever stopping their arguments.

    Yet also being a language teacher, I see both sides and have an affinity for anytime I hear xenophobic remarks, no matter the country, I feel the need to stand up against oppressors. I have a personal saying: no country has a monopoly on idiots/stupidity/etc.

    I'm a professional ESL teacher and if you'd never told me English wasn't your native language, I wouldn't have had a hard time guessing English isn't your native language. You more than have held your own. Du bist auf Augenhöhe. [You are "on equal footing."] :) I'm envious that my German isn't half as good as your English is.
  22. In my experience at work and traveling in Germany, the Germans are proud of their beer, wine(Reisling), automobiles, chefs knives, and the autobahn, alone with other things. I miss driving on the autobahn. I was on vacation in Bamberg during World Cup 2006, and the change in spirit was eyeopening.

    Just my $0.02.
  23. steveh

    steveh Advocate (705) Illinois Oct 8, 2003

    I used to run into that exact mindset when drinking that "weird beer." From the old-timers at the bar drinking their BM & C.

    So yeah, there's no exclusivity to ignorance.
  24. steveh

    steveh Advocate (705) Illinois Oct 8, 2003

    Our Wüstof set cheers you! :D
  25. steveh

    steveh Advocate (705) Illinois Oct 8, 2003

    Copy that too.
  26. The rampant ignorance regarding lagers among a large majority of self-proclaimed beer advocates is all the proof you need to back up this statement.
    cu29, grantcty and steveh like this.
  27. We should send all of those folks some Victory Braumeister Pils – Sladek, don’t you think!?!;)

    Na Zdrowie!
  28. steveh

    steveh Advocate (705) Illinois Oct 8, 2003

    Huh. Whole leaf hops -- what a concept. ;)

    So, is it "artsy" (Ich auch bin ein Kunstler) to use backwards letters -- a la Russian revolutionary propaganda posters?
    boddhitree likes this.

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