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will the keg carbonate faster under 12 lbs. psi indoors or in cold garage?

Discussion in 'Home Bar' started by Lloyd528, Dec 23, 2012.

  1. Lloyd528

    Lloyd528 Zealot (80) Ohio Dec 29, 2008

    basically, I forgot the rule about getting quicker carbonation. Should I bring them in from the garage where it's cold and carbonate them at 70 degrees inside before I chill the beer or does it even matter?
  2. VikeMan

    VikeMan Advocate (740) Pennsylvania Jul 12, 2009

    Colder temperatures requires lower PSIs to achieve the same carbonation level.
  3. Lloyd528

    Lloyd528 Zealot (80) Ohio Dec 29, 2008

    does that mean inside speeds up the process or out in the cold at the same psi?
  4. If you're talking about leaving it on a certain psi to carb for a week it will take the same amount of time in either environment, just the psi will be different to achieve the same level of carbonation.
  5. NiceFly

    NiceFly Savant (375) Tajikistan Dec 22, 2011

    Do you enjoy 1.445 volumes of CO2?
    If yes, then 70F.
    else, cold.
    :eek:
    cubbyswans likes this.
  6. This is a trick question. It won't carbonate sufficiently indoors, presumably at room temperature, at 12psi, no matter how much time you give it, so there's no contest. (I'm assuming you're looking for 2.5-ish volumes of CO2)
  7. koopa

    koopa Champion (765) New Jersey Apr 20, 2008

    Colder = potentially faster

    If you are in a super rush, chill the keg to refrigerator temps then hook it up to 30 psi, lay it on its side on a counter or floor and then roll it back and forth vigorously for 2-3 minutes. Next stand it up and let it relax for 15+ minutes. After the rest, put a towel over the pressure relief valve and pull till the keg is around 10 psi. Put it back into refrigerator temps and in 6-24 hours it will be drinkable.
  8. billandsuz

    billandsuz Savant (380) New York Sep 1, 2004

    cold liquid holds more gas than warm liquid.
    all liquids want to equilibrate with atmosphere no matter what. beer in a keg is in its own atmosphere. so yes, cold beer will carbonate (that is it will absorb CO2) faster than warm beer, all other things being equal.

    use a carbonation calculator and chill it for best results.
    Cheers.
  9. Lloyd528

    Lloyd528 Zealot (80) Ohio Dec 29, 2008

    thanks for the carb table. Now I know that this wheat beer should be carbed in the 2.6 range. What's the general rule for carbing it if your'e not in a rush? Just leave it at 10 psi for a few days or some other combination? Any opinions are appreciated. It's been a while since I used a keg.
  10. koopa

    koopa Champion (765) New Jersey Apr 20, 2008

    As per the carb table, if you set it at 10 psi and keep the temperature between 33 and 34F it will produce roughly 2.6 on the carbonation. The usual time frame is 10-14 days at that low of a psi I believe.
  11. Lloyd528

    Lloyd528 Zealot (80) Ohio Dec 29, 2008

    10-14 days? I thought the beauty of kegging vs. bottling was that you could have carbonated beer in much less time? What if I cranked it up to 30 psi overnight and dropped it down a peg or two over the next few days..would that help and avoid waiting 2 weeks? Thanks for your help.
  12. You can have carbed beer in 5 minutes using kegs. But it can be a crap shoot. Until you develop a technique that works for you, the odds are good that you'll overshoot the mark. 10-14 days at serving pressure, on the other hand, will nail it every time.
    NiceFly likes this.
  13. NiceFly

    NiceFly Savant (375) Tajikistan Dec 22, 2011

    I must not be as strong as mikehartigan because I get tired before I hit 2.6 volumes shaking the keg;). But he is correct you can have carbed beer in minutes.

    I will crank up the PSI as high as I can go without blowing the emergency valve on the regulator, usually in the 40 PSI range. Then I lay the keg on it's side and roll back and forth for a few minutes. My regulator has a stopcock valve between the regulator and the gas line, I turn that off.

    Now roll/shake some more to equal out the pressure in the keg.

    Stand the keg up, turn the regulator down, release the extra pressure in the regulator via the emergency valve and open the stopcock.

    The PSI on the regulator will jump up. Read the PSI on the regulator. Is it at the correct PSI for the temperature and vol CO2 you desire? Cool, you are done. If not rinse and repeat.

    Good luck and congrats on your new kegging system.
  14. While I consistently advocate the 'set it and forget it' method, I'll admit that, after I keg a beer and purge the headspace with CO2, I typically hit it with 50-60psi, then disconnect the gas before stowing it in the closet for a few weeks to mature. When I eventually chill it, the carbonation level is usually high enough to get a good sense of how it's going to taste after it settles in at the proper level. This is not nearly enough gas to over carb it at room temp.
  15. koopa

    koopa Champion (765) New Jersey Apr 20, 2008

    As I mentioned in my previous post....

    If you are in a super rush, chill the keg to refrigerator temps then hook it up to 30 psi, lay it on its side on a counter or floor and then roll it back and forth vigorously for 2-3 minutes. Next stand it up and let it relax for 15+ minutes. After the rest, put a towel over the pressure relief valve and pull till the keg is around 10 psi. Put it back into refrigerator temps and in 6-24 hours it will be drinkable.

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