1. The wait is over! Download the BeerAdvocate app on iTunes or Google Play now.
  2. Get 12 issues / year of BeerAdvocate magazine for only $9.99!

Wort Chiller Hookup

Discussion in 'Homebrewing' started by utahbeerdude, Mar 11, 2012.

  1. utahbeerdude

    utahbeerdude Savant (440) Utah May 2, 2006

    I thought that people might be interested in my latest homebrewing project. We recently installed a new sink and faucet. The faucet is great, but I can't hook up a hose adaptor to it for chilling wort, etc. So today I installed the two ball valves with the hose adaptors that you see here.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 30, 2014
  2. utahbeerdude

    utahbeerdude Savant (440) Utah May 2, 2006

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 30, 2014
    MLeicht, newjack and tngolfer like this.
  3. scurvy311

    scurvy311 Savant (415) Louisiana Dec 3, 2005

    Very nice. Good idea doing a hot water valve also. Very clean setup. Not that you asked for my 2 cents, but maybe consider using command hooks and zip ties to secure the hoses to the wall out of the way. Or staple a zip tie to the wall then use it to secure the hoses.
     
  4. billandsuz

    billandsuz Savant (415) New York Sep 1, 2004

    i did the same thing. but unlike you i did not bother to use an braided extension. so i have to nearly clear out all of the undersink crap to hook up.
    maybe have a red handle hot/blue handle cold?
    nice job.
     
  5. rcusick

    rcusick Aficionado (110) Virginia Jun 30, 2009

    thanks for posting this, i have the same problem with my new faucet....the last two batches i've brewed i ran a hose from my laundry room....so i've been looking at doing something very similar to this

    one question for you though.....what do you use the hot water for?
     
  6. AlCaponeJunior

    AlCaponeJunior Champion (800) Texas May 21, 2010

    That's funny because I got my wort chiller right before I was going to brew a batch, only to discover it had only the garden hose hookup and nothing designed to attach to a regular sink. Didn't have the time to go find a different connector, and running a hose up the side of the building to the 2nd floor is not an option. I was kind of screwed, but then I remembered about the "generic universal solution," duck tape! Wasn't pretty, but it worked!

    I filled the wort chiller with hot water when it went into the boil pot, to keep it from slowing down the boil, then turned it to cold at the end of the boil.
     
  7. utahbeerdude

    utahbeerdude Savant (440) Utah May 2, 2006



    As for the hot, I thought I'd go ahead and hook it up while I was doing the cold. I think it may be useful for cleaning chores, such as filling a carboy for soaking in one-step.
     
  8. utahbeerdude

    utahbeerdude Savant (440) Utah May 2, 2006

    My son thought that a red handle for hot would be good also. Thanks.
     
  9. utahbeerdude

    utahbeerdude Savant (440) Utah May 2, 2006



    Zip ties would certainly be a good idea for positioning the hoses, if necessary. It is not obvious from the picture, but the hoses are pretty close the the back wall and then side wall, and are out of the way of the trash can that sits on that side of the cabinet.
     
  10. bwiechmann

    bwiechmann Savant (310) Minnesota Nov 30, 2009

    Dang, that's awesome- thanks for sharing! I use a simple adapter that screws into my sink faucet but it's a cumbersome and annoying set-up. This is my next project for sure.
     
  11. scurvy311

    scurvy311 Savant (415) Louisiana Dec 3, 2005

    The hot water, if it is good enough to brew with, would definitely cut down on your brew time if you are extract or all grain by allowing you to start with hot water for a head start to mash temps or boiling. If not, definitely worth having for cleanup.
     
  12. tngolfer

    tngolfer Aficionado (215) Tennessee Feb 16, 2012

    I have the same problem. I just showed my wife and she is fine with it. Thanks for the idea!\
     
  13. stevefinny

    stevefinny Savant (365) New Jersey Aug 28, 2009

    Nice job. Looks great!
     
  14. zappermike

    zappermike Initiate (5) Oct 29, 2014

    Hey, for anyone who has done this, do you have a parts list? I love it and would like to replicate it since my current system stretches a hose across the house.
     
  15. utahbeerdude

    utahbeerdude Savant (440) Utah May 2, 2006

    Sorry, I don't have a parts list. I suggest that you print off the picture and take it to Lowes/Home Depot and show it to someone in plumbing. They should be able to help you figure out the parts.

    A bit of advice: Get some of the pink (visible in the picture) or yellow teflon tape for making the pipe-fitting connections. These two tapes are thicker than the standard white and because of this they tend to seal better than the thin white tape. At least that is my experience.
     
  16. My dad actually suggested I do exactly this in my kitchen, but the copper pipe ends down in the basement and we don't have the tools to add a splitter in the braided mesh. Still, very classy and convenient solution you've got there.
     
  17. scurvy311

    scurvy311 Savant (415) Louisiana Dec 3, 2005

    Depending on the size of the copper pipe you may be able to use what they use when they want to tie in a icemaker into old copper pipes for a new refrigerator. On second thought though you might not be satisfied with the amount of flow. I never used one but I've seen them. It's sort of looks like a saddle and it just punches a hole and seals around it into the copper pipe. I'm just not sure how much water flow you to get out of it.
     
  18. jbakajust1

    jbakajust1 Moderator (545) Oregon Aug 25, 2009 Staff Member

    Personally, I would recommend getting the ball valves with the locking pins. I hate mine on my kettle because the flames from the burner can make that sucker hot and I have to grab it pull it up to move the handle, but in a situation like this I would want it, just in case I hit the handle whilst taking out the garbage.
     
  19. Old thread, to be sure. But this comment deserves a response. The bacterial stew that is cooking in most hot water tanks is generally not suitable for consumption. That's why it's always recommended to start with cold water when cooking. Heat it up in the kettle.
     
  20. utahbeerdude

    utahbeerdude Savant (440) Utah May 2, 2006

    That's a good idea. My insurance against this sort of thing is to put (screw-on) caps on the hose connectors when I'm not using the valves.
     
  21. VikeMan

    VikeMan Champion (750) Pennsylvania Jul 12, 2009

    I've done this, to supply a humidifier. As you surmised, the flow rate would be woefully inadequate for a wort chiller.
     
    scurvy311 likes this.
  22. The problem is that the copper pipe is on a different floor of my house. It switches to plex in the basement, then pokes up through the floor, and I think it switches to mesh right near the bottom of my kitchen cabinet. I mean, I could always split the line in the basement and drill another hole in my kitchen cabinet, but at some point it's a lot less work to just run the hose up from my basement sink.
     

Share This Page