Category: Fermented Culture

In Remembrance: Best Mild Fermented Culture by

In remembrance of Best Mild, a beer popular in 1950s England that was usually a somewhat stronger and darker version of a brewery’s Ordinary Mild.

Living Beer Styles and the Death of William Younger’s XXP Fermented Culture by

Following the evolution of William Younger’s XXP over time, from a premium export IPA clocking in at 200 IBU to a standard pub Bitter.

The Return of Whitbread Pale Ale Fermented Culture by

Last year Whitbread Pale Ale was relaunched in the UK, brewed by the highly regarded Windsor & Eton. Let’s not worry too much about whether it’s an IPA, Pale Ale, or Light Ale. Just rejoice at the return of Whitbread’s iconic hind logo.

Newcastle Brown Ale: A Quintessential, Atypical Beer Fermented Culture by

Known as “the Dog” in its home of England, Newcastle’s ubiquitous Brown Ale was atypical in its strength and production methods when it debuted in 1927.

Gold Label: A Revolutionary Beer Fermented Culture by

In the 1950s, Tennant Brothers advertised Gold Label, its pale Barleywine, as a beer “as strong as a double whiskey and half the price.”

The Surprising History of the Session IPA Fermented Culture by

Scottish and English brewing records from over a century ago reveal a surprising number of low-ABV hoppy beers that look a lot like today’s trendy Session IPAs.

State-Controlled Pubs Fermented Culture by

Beginning as a government effort to curb drinking by WWI munitions workers, state-controlled pubs persisted in some English towns until the 1970s.

The Rise and Fall of Beer Houses Fermented Culture by

England’s attempt to create a free market in beer led to an explosion of small, beer-only pubs—and the beginning of the end for Porter.

The History of England’s Tied Houses Fermented Culture by

The history of England’s tied houses, or brewery-owned pubs, isn’t quite as black and white as it might seem.

60 Shilling Ale Fermented Culture by

Untangling the origins of Scottish 60 Shilling Ale and the now virtually extinct style’s transformation over time.

Dark Mild Fermented Culture by

The history of Mild stretches back several hundred years, but why and when a dark version emerged has long been a mystery for beer historians.

Adulterating Germans Fermented Culture by

Despite the strict rules of the Reinheitsgebot, in the mid-1800s, Germans were no less prone to tampering with beer than the British.

Canadian IPA Circa 1900 Fermented Culture by

The popularity of British imports like Bass Pale Ale made India Pale Ale a popular style in Canada at the turn of the 20th century.

1953 Coronation Ales Fermented Culture by

A look at the coronation beers of 1953, the first Strong Ales brewed in Britain after supply shortages at the end of WWII forced brewers to ration ingredients.

International Collaboration in the 19th Century Fermented Culture by

There’s nothing new about collaboration beers; international brewers have been working together for centuries. Pilsner, for instance, was born when British and Bavarian brewing technology intersected with Bohemian raw materials.

German Porter: Part Two Fermented Culture by

In Cold War-era East Germany, Porter brewing included a surprising step: the addition of Brettanomyces during secondary fermentation.

German Porter: Part One Fermented Culture by

There’s an unbroken history of Porter brewing in Germany going back around 200 years. Porter was the first style to be a huge international hit and was brewed all over the world.

Dutch Oud Bruin Fermented Culture by

Whenever someone claims every style of beer is brewed in the US, my response is always: What about Dutch Oud Bruin?

Home Brewery’s Beers Fermented Culture by

Of Newark-upon-Trent’s 35 pubs, only four served cask. All owned by Nottingham brewer Home Ales. Modern geeks wouldn’t have loved them. But they had a few things drinkers loved. They were cheap. And their cask beers were always in good condition.

Lichtenhainer Fermented Culture by

Northern Germany was once home to dozens of top-fermenting beer styles. Most drowned under the tsunami of lager that flooded the region at the end of the 19th century. A few tenacious ones managed to cling on past WWII, fewer still until today.

English Stout Fermented Culture by

It’s clear that Guinness, although popular, was far from dominant in the British Stout market. And there were many Stouts not just as dry as Guinness, but far drier.

Wondering About Watney Fermented Culture by

The name Watney conjures up very different emotions either side of the Atlantic. Many North Americans nurture fond memories of Red Barrel as a quality import. Older Brits mostly harbor a lingering contempt. But what’s the truth about Watney’s beer? Was it really that bad?

The Ales of Carlsberg Fermented Culture by

Carlsberg’s Carl Jacobsen had clearly been impressed by what he’d seen on his travels and brought back an enthusiasm for British ales. So much enthusiasm that he started brewing ales alongside the lagers you would expect.

Berliner Weisse Part Two Fermented Culture by

Berliner Weisse entered the twentieth century in robust health. New-fangled lager beers had dented its popularity a little, but it remained one of the city’s favorite styles. That was to change as the century progressed, and its popularity slowly declined.

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