Pynk | Yards Brewing Co.

BA SCORE
83
good
55 Reviews
THE BROS
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BEER INFO

Brewed by:
Yards Brewing Co.
Pennsylvania, United States
yardsbrewing.com

Style: Fruit / Vegetable Beer

Alcohol by volume (ABV): 5.50%

Availability: Fall

Notes / Commercial Description:
We brew each batch with over 3,000 pounds of fresh raspberries and both sour and sweet cherries. The addition of fruit prior to fermentation makes this crisp ale tart instead of sweet. It’s pink in color of course, light-bodied, and refreshing with delicate, delectable berry aromas. We’ll bet the farm that there’s no better autumn seasonal around.

Added by NeroFiddled on 10-26-2003

BEER STATS
Reviews:
55
Ratings:
297
Avg:
3.67
pDev:
14.71%
 
 
Wants:
8
Gots:
74
For Trade:
0
User Reviews
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Reviews: 55 | Ratings: 297
Photo of NeroFiddled
4.3/5  rDev +17.2%
look: 4 | smell: 4 | taste: 4.5 | feel: 4 | overall: 4.5

Its clear, reddish-orange body is capped by a short but creamy head of delicate white foam that drops to a razor-thin lid but somehow manages to leaves some thin, lingering lace about the glass. The nose is lightly sweet and delicately tart with a slight Brettanomyces character (barnyard, horse blanket, wet hay, etc.) that's not strong enough to keep the uninitiated away, but strong enough to keep the aficianado's interest. The body is thin and it's gently crisp on the tongue with a fine carbonation. The flavor follows the suggestion of the nose with a mild sweet-tart character laced around delicate fruit (berries and cherry, but not particularily raspberry per se). It finishes short and dry, leaving the palate yearning for another taste as it's been tempted but not satiated. This is an exceptionally drinkable beer! Easily and without a doubt, the most balanced "infected" beer I've ever had. It may not be from Belgium, but it's certainly worth trying!

 965 characters

Photo of nomad
3.96/5  rDev +7.9%
look: 4.5 | smell: 3.5 | taste: 4 | feel: 3.5 | overall: 4.5

Poured a pink-ish ruby red color. Its pink puffy head and lace stuck around pretty well despite showing little carbonation underneath. Rare for a lambic to retain a head this well but this beer was super-fresh and on a fairly pressurized draught.

Smell was very sour with that quintessential lambic presence - the wild off-shoots from the yeast. It did not have the full range or vibrancy of, say, Cantillon lambics but an impressive showing nonetheless. Taste was sour, vinegary, yeasty, and with a little funk - altogether a solid display of lambic goodness. Had a small cherry presence, larger raspberry presence. Juicy and very drinkable, with a bare finish. Great tart flavor. Impressive

This a fantastic session beer, though the draught made it a bit too pressurized, creating a not-so-natural carbonation feeling. Within the spectrum of lambics its between Lindeman’s and Cantillon, tilting much toward the latter. A lot better than any other beer they make save the ESA. By chance I sat next to one of their brewers, Joe, at Dirty Frank's and he confirmed they follow the book on belgian fruit lambics down to everything but the wild results of Brussels’ open air. Bravo. Get it if you're in Philadelphia.

 1,222 characters

Photo of GeoffFromSJ
4.33/5  rDev +18%
look: 4.5 | smell: 4 | taste: 4.5 | feel: 4 | overall: 4.5

This was a good lambic. The beer looked great, but I must say the best thing about the beer was that they did not make this too sweet. This made it very drinkable and less like a fizzy fruit drink and more like the fruit beer it should be. A real treat. This balance in taste made it much more drinkable. I would definitely have this again.

The beer distributor at the bar told me they separate this beer in the brewery so the yeast don't make the other beers sour. This made sense and when you drink it you'll understand. You could definitely taste some of the sourness, which along with the hops moderated the fruit.

 621 characters

Photo of stirgy
4.16/5  rDev +13.4%
look: 5 | smell: 4 | taste: 4 | feel: 4 | overall: 4.5

I’m very glad I got to try this beer. I think it is supposed to be Yards’ interpretation of a Framboise Lambic and I applaude them for the effort – and for the product. The beer was served in a traditional Belgium chalice and the color alone really made me stop and admire this beer. It was a light ruby red, very clear and was topped with a creamy pink head. There’s a slightly sweet, slightly sour tart aroma. The taste is fine with raspberry juice, cherries, oranges and plums prominent. Tangy sweet, light and refreshing with a dry finish.

This beer reminds of a simple light lager with raspberry juice, but it’s a little more complex than that. Very interesting.

 675 characters

Photo of Scoats
4/5  rDev +9%
look: 4 | smell: 4 | taste: 4 | feel: 4 | overall: 4

Wow, what an interesting beer. It is a light red, from what appears to be the combination of a gold beer base with the red coming from the fruit.

The basic flavor is very crisp. In the aftertaste, there is definitely an intentional sourness from the bacteria lambic style fermentation. The fruit is not heavy handed. It doesn't cover up the sourness, more leads into it. In this way, it is not a Lindemans style lambic. In a way this is rather nice as the super sweet fruit beer is pretty standard now.

All in all an interesting experiment. It won't make most people see god, but damn finely crafted.

 608 characters

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Pynk from Yards Brewing Co.
3.67 out of 5 based on 297 ratings.
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