106-Year-Old Woman Who Credits Longevity To Daily Yuengling Gets Gift From Brewery

Discussion in 'Beer Talk' started by Todd, Oct 22, 2021.

  1. Todd

    Todd Founder (6,511) Aug 23, 1996 California
    Staff Moderator Fest Crew Society Trader

    https://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com/2021/10/21/yuengling-lager-106-year-old-woman/

    https://twitter.com/yuenglingbeer/status/1451249992430202880?s=20
     
  2. Foyle

    Foyle Meyvn (1,051) Sep 29, 2007 North Carolina

    Clearly beer is the key to longevity! :slight_smile:
     
    Squire, REVZEB, bluejacket74 and 4 others like this.
  3. SILVER

    SILVER Initiate (184) Jan 3, 2007 Florida

    Although I'm not quite that age, it's worked for me, so far.
     
    bluejacket74 and Resistance88 like this.
  4. moodenba

    moodenba Zealot (504) Feb 2, 2015 New York

    Yuengling Traditional Lager was introduced in 1987. The age 106 Ms Dilullo was about 72 at that time. It would be interesting to know what she was drinking to survive to that age.
     
    Blogjackets, DCH, VABA and 6 others like this.
  5. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (5,213) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
    Society

    Maybe she was a Chetty gal!?!

    [​IMG]
     
  6. Giantspace

    Giantspace Savant (907) Dec 22, 2011 Pennsylvania

    Great publicity stunt. A full truck of beer? Really?

    I love the video of her chugging a beer from the can.

    Enjoy
     
  7. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (5,213) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
    Society

    Did you get invited to the party?

    [​IMG]
     
    VABA, bluejacket74 and BigIronH like this.
  8. rgordon

    rgordon Meyvn (1,177) Apr 26, 2012 North Carolina

    My Grandad drank Bud with Jack London (circa 1906) and with his grand son in 1965. My Mom was not too amused.
     
  9. moodenba

    moodenba Zealot (504) Feb 2, 2015 New York

    I wasn't aware of the slang, and had to look it up. Why not Chesty?
     
    bluejacket74 and BigIronH like this.
  10. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (5,213) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
    Society

    I will await the responses of other BAs here. :popcorn:

    Cheers!
     
  11. IPAExpert69

    IPAExpert69 Aspirant (225) Aug 2, 2017 Pennsylvania

    Growing up in PA with a dad who had more eclectic tastes, this was the only cheap beer he would buy for me (we called it Lord C or Chetty amongst me and my high school friends). But to answer your question, Yuengling takes marketing super seriously. They have letters from friends of Lord Chesterfield who lovingly referred to him as Chetty. Hence where the nickname came from! I might buy some Lord C when I get off work it's been a while.
     
  12. steveh

    steveh Poo-Bah (3,185) Oct 8, 2003 Illinois
    Society

    I'm forwarding this to my cardiologist. He has the best laugh. :grin::rolling_eyes:
     
  13. steveh

    steveh Poo-Bah (3,185) Oct 8, 2003 Illinois
    Society

    'Cause ... he was a marine hero in WW2?

    :grin:
     
  14. rgordon

    rgordon Meyvn (1,177) Apr 26, 2012 North Carolina

    It's a Penalvania thang...
     
    bluejacket74 and BigIronH like this.
  15. steveh

    steveh Poo-Bah (3,185) Oct 8, 2003 Illinois
    Society

    Part of the prison system? :grin:
     
    Rug, bluejacket74, BigIronH and 2 others like this.
  16. rgordon

    rgordon Meyvn (1,177) Apr 26, 2012 North Carolina

    Oglethorpe, Georgia, Ned Kelly, Australia, the peopling of the realm. Nah, I really don't know much Pennsylvania slang, except for CHEESESTEAK please.
     
  17. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (5,213) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
    Society

    Permit me to increase your vocabulary by 100%

    [​IMG]
     
    bluejacket74, BigIronH and rgordon like this.
  18. rgordon

    rgordon Meyvn (1,177) Apr 26, 2012 North Carolina

    OK. Yo, man gimme a cheesteak. I'm now watching Andy Griffith and the dialect is so real and still pervasive. My Dad was from the Southside of Virginia and later (depression) Richmond and his oat and and abots, like the Outer Banks, harken back to English diction....
     
    Squire, bluejacket74 and BigIronH like this.
  19. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (5,213) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
    Society

    bluejacket74, rgordon and BigIronH like this.
  20. BigIronH

    BigIronH Savant (956) Oct 31, 2019 Michigan
    Society Trader

    If I make it to 106, maybe Transient will bring me a truckload of IPA’s…
     
    Blogjackets, VABA, Rug and 1 other person like this.
  21. rgordon

    rgordon Meyvn (1,177) Apr 26, 2012 North Carolina

    Is it slightly suggestive?
     
    BigIronH and bluejacket74 like this.
  22. rgordon

    rgordon Meyvn (1,177) Apr 26, 2012 North Carolina

    BigIronH and bluejacket74 like this.
  23. Giantspace

    Giantspace Savant (907) Dec 22, 2011 Pennsylvania

    Hey, grab me one of them Jawns while your up.

    Enjoy
     
    rudiecantfail, Rug, BigIronH and 2 others like this.
  24. rgordon

    rgordon Meyvn (1,177) Apr 26, 2012 North Carolina

    Jawn is great. Maybe I can get it to catch on like ya'll. Might take 100 years or so.
     
    BigIronH and bluejacket74 like this.
  25. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (5,213) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
    Society

    Maybe not in the hinterland?

    Cheers!

    P.S. Since we are discussing vocabulary, you may likely know this already but just in case you don’t:

    “Hinterland is a German word meaning "the land behind" (a city, a port, or similar).”
     
  26. rgordon

    rgordon Meyvn (1,177) Apr 26, 2012 North Carolina

    Hinterland has a broader meaning in literature. That would be in areas away from the exact area of focus. Exact definitions are fine, but usage is where language is and how it progresses and develops. Hinterland often means not here but out there. The Brits, being somewhat Germanic have taken this meaning to heart. It must be the Gaelic, Druidic, and Pict influence that makes our language so malleable and wonderful.
     
    Squire likes this.
  27. rudiecantfail

    rudiecantfail Meyvn (1,168) Aug 9, 2011 Pennsylvania

    Just an FYI, in Pennsylvania's hinterlands, ya'll is "yinz". I've never said it, and I've never known anyone who's used it, but I've been either in Philly or the Philly burbs my whole life. Out in the vast middle of the state, between Philly and Pittsburgh, it's a real word.
     
  28. jesskidden

    jesskidden Poo-Bah (2,319) Aug 10, 2005 New Jersey
    Society Trader

    Yeah, I never heard it called "Chetty" either (granted, I didn't "grow up" in what was then Yuengling territory). I always called it just "Chesterfield Ale" and that's what I recall most people and retailers in NY, PA and NJ, where I purchased it, called it in the 1970s and 1980s. So, no "LORD" (sorry, I'm a small 'd' democrat) and that was also typical of Yuengling's own ads and promo materials, omitting or downplaying it as shown in this collection of 'snips" from the 1950-80s.
    [​IMG]
    Today, Yuengling claims that the brand dates from their founding in the 1829, which is just nuts (and is disproved by the above 1970s ad's "Since 1935") - beer brand names like that really didn't even exist at the time and why would a German brewer name his beer after a English Lord? Most sources note that Yuengling brewed top-fermented "common beer" during their first years of existence before they (and other US brewers) were able to get lager yeast.

    Of course, lots of US brewers eventually used corny "English" images and tropes for their ales, and Yuengling was hardly the only "Lord":
    [​IMG]
    Note that Salisbury was even from Yuengling's cross-town rival in Pottsville - the Mt. Carbon Brewing Co.

    As for the question of what Margie drank previous to the creation of the brewery's Traditional Amber Lager, if it was Chesterfield I understand why she switched - Yuengling dumbed down their Ale sometime around the same era as their changed the label.

    Above, second from the right is label for the version I always bought and loved. The current version leaves me with the same disappointment as Pabst's Ballantine Ale.

    I included a Philadelphia's brewery's Shakespeare Ale due to the similarity of label design, even tho' ol' Will wasn't a Lord (was he? So, Elton John is but not Shakespeare?)

    Gee, I thought Chesty was a stripper (probably more than one) - could still have been a hero, I suppose.
     
    #28 jesskidden, Oct 23, 2021
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2021
    Rug, o29, IPAExpert69 and 3 others like this.
  29. steveh

    steveh Poo-Bah (3,185) Oct 8, 2003 Illinois
    Society

    Maybe just me, but I don't think I'd like to see Chesty Puller doing the bump & grind. :wink:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chesty_Puller
     
    moodenba and PapaGoose03 like this.
  30. moodenba

    moodenba Zealot (504) Feb 2, 2015 New York

    My old roommate hailed from Minersville (Pottsville area), and he called it Chesterfield, both with and without "Lord". The mention of "Canadian style" in one of the print ads in your post reminds me. Ex-roomie toured the brewery in about 1971. Guide said that Yuengling purchased ale yeast from a Canadian brewery. Said delivery and quality were variable.
    Chetty/Chesty: New nickname for my prized ModII bottle of 70s era Nude beer?
     
  31. jesskidden

    jesskidden Poo-Bah (2,319) Aug 10, 2005 New Jersey
    Society Trader

    Yeah, the period when Yuengling used a top-fermenting ale yeast for Chesterfield (and, Porter) is somewhat in dispute. The above snip is from their handout from the early 80s, yet, in 1999, Dick Jr. told Modern Brewery Age:
    The 1983 GABF program said of the beer:
    M. Jackson's first US ed of his Pocket Guide to Beer said of the two:
    In the post-Repeal era in the US the "Canadian (style) ale" designation was used by several brewers as synonymous with "lively ale" or "cream ale" (back when the latter term meant a true ale, not the bastardized "ale/lager blend" created by Genesee in 1960).

    P. Ballantine & Sons new owners, the Badenhausen brothers, even suggested that their brewmaster model his new post-Repeal recipe for Ballantine XXX Ale on the:
     
    Rug, ChicagoJ and PapaGoose03 like this.
  32. rgordon

    rgordon Meyvn (1,177) Apr 26, 2012 North Carolina

    I've been all over Pennsylvania, had a great number of Pa. classmates, have spent time in State College and I've never heard yinz uttered. But I do like the word and sentiment,
     
  33. Squire

    Squire Poo-Bah (2,656) Jul 16, 2015 Mississippi
    Society Trader

    So that's what's been keeping me going.
     
    Blogjackets, MikeWard, Rug and 3 others like this.
  34. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (5,213) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
    Society

    It is my understanding that yinz is a western PA (e.g., Pittsburgh area) thing.

    https://yinzbuy.com/what-does-yinz-mean/

    Cheers!
     
    rgordon likes this.
  35. rgordon

    rgordon Meyvn (1,177) Apr 26, 2012 North Carolina

  36. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (5,213) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
    Society

    No clue. I personally have never heard anyone use the word "yinz".

    But I have heard lots of Yo's!

    Cheers!
     
    rgordon likes this.
  37. rgordon

    rgordon Meyvn (1,177) Apr 26, 2012 North Carolina

    And the Bud crew tried to sue Natty Greene brewery here in Greensboro, named after Nathanael Greene, Rhode Island Quaker and American hero. They thought it was borrowing on Natural Light's nickname. They lost.
     
  38. rgordon

    rgordon Meyvn (1,177) Apr 26, 2012 North Carolina

    Yo is universal!!!
     
    Rug likes this.
  39. rudiecantfail

    rudiecantfail Meyvn (1,168) Aug 9, 2011 Pennsylvania

    I think I recall Ozzylizard using it occasionally. He's from the top left of the state if I'm correct, up by Erie somewhere. I'm bottom right.
     
  40. ESHBG

    ESHBG Disciple (371) Jul 30, 2011 Pennsylvania