American Imperial Pilsner, but no American Pilsner?

Discussion in 'BeerAdvocate Talk' started by rodbeermunch, Feb 21, 2020.

  1. rodbeermunch

    rodbeermunch Poo-Bah (5,333) Sep 30, 2015 Nevada
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    Just added a new beer from San Francisco Beer Week. It's a Loral hopped pilsner. Pretty good too, but that is besides the point.

    Being that it is an American hop, I figured when adding the beer here, I would do it as an American Pilsner. Well shoot, all I see is an American Imperial Pilsner, and that ain't the place for this 5.4% pilsner.

    I'd like to have an addition of American Pilsner as a style option? Thoughts?
    [​IMG]



    https://www.beeradvocate.com/beer/profile/38745/468551/
     
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  2. steveh

    steveh Poo-Bah (2,612) Oct 8, 2003 Illinois
    Society

    I like to call these "Nouveau Pilsner." Seems others have followed suit in other writings.
     
  3. ichorNet

    ichorNet Meyvn (1,281) Mar 16, 2010 Massachusetts

    Nice! Kinda similar to how I call American IPAs/DIPAs that a). aren't super-hazy, b). use modern hops and odd hop varietal combinations, and c). do not conform to what we think of as any kind of previously-attempted IPA sub-style "nouveau IPAs."

    As for the point of this thread, I think there should probably be a "modern American pilsner" or at the very least a "hoppy/hop-focused lager" category. I am not one to say that adding more styles does anything to "dilute" the currently-available style listing. More styles = better.
     
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  4. steveh

    steveh Poo-Bah (2,612) Oct 8, 2003 Illinois
    Society

    Isn't that where IPLs come into play? I don't know how "recognized" they are as a style, and I always call foul in that they're pretty similar to American IPAs anyway, but yeah -- diluting the styles seems to be how the trend is trending.
     
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  5. jesskidden

    jesskidden Poo-Bah (1,970) Aug 10, 2005 New Jersey
    Society Trader

    I guess the styles have been changed over the years on BA - there used to be an American "All Malt" Lager style, not sure if it was called that - and under that style were all sort of old-line adjunct lagers which I see are now under "American Lager". Beers like Yuengling Premium - a standard US corn-adjunct lager that long pre-dated their current Traditional Lager flagship - and Shiner Blonde and Premium (which, as I understand it are the same beer, just name changes in different time periods) and similar beers like Duquesne, Burger, Stegmaier, Huber even Pittburgh's joke brand "Olde Frothingslosh" (!) :astonished: as well as Canadian beers like Moosehead and Molson Golden are all just standard adjunct lagers - but seem to be placed under a different style here because they come from a small "craft brewer" or are imported. Seems to me "all malt" (and maybe a slightly higher ibu rating, 20 or over, at least) should be part of a "American Lager" catagory if only to distinguish it from AAL.
     
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  6. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (4,393) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
    Society

    @rodbeermunch,
    There is an existing style of American Lager. There is even a lager which features Loral hops that is rated #35 in this category:

    “Loral Lager

    Zero Gravity Craft Brewery / American Flatbread”

    Is there a reason that you think that the beer you recently had does not fit in this category?

    Cheers!
     
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  7. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (4,393) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
    Society

    My memory is that there used to be a category of "American Pale Lager" and this has been 'rebranded' as the current category of "American Lager".

    Cheers!
     
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  8. rodbeermunch

    rodbeermunch Poo-Bah (5,333) Sep 30, 2015 Nevada
    Society Trader

    Yeah, if we have American Imperial Pilsner, a category of American Pilsner would seem to make sense as well. Its like having a 10 gauge shotgun category but not a 12 gauge category, you got the bigger one, but not the more prevalent/traditional one (been shotgun shopping so this was the handy analogy).

    I mean, heck, if you just wrote Ale and Lager, is there a reason any beer would not fit in these categories? I mean, categorization and why? is a pretty well accepted organizational premise in life be it from a beer, anthropological, historical or psychological vantage point, prolly not a discussion that would escape being moderated into the cornfield here.

    Thanks for the heads up on the Loral Lager, sounds like good stuff, I'll have to look for it next time I'm out that way.
     
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  9. bubseymour

    bubseymour Poo-Bah (2,903) Oct 30, 2010 Maryland
    Society Trader

    American Imperial Pilsner is a catagory that should not exist (not yet anyway). Too specialized/ not enough beers being made in this cstagory to warrant its existence (IMO). IPL or American lager are fine for now.
     
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  10. bubseymour

    bubseymour Poo-Bah (2,903) Oct 30, 2010 Maryland
    Society Trader

    On the subject....why is there like 5-6 different porter categories now? Didn’t we have lengthy discussions in past years on the forum that porters and stouts are the same beer basically and just how brewers choose to call them for marketing reasons?
     
  11. bubseymour

    bubseymour Poo-Bah (2,903) Oct 30, 2010 Maryland
    Society Trader

    Recent addition of American Brett beer As a style? Yet no Fruited Kettle Sour category (which is a huge easily identifiable unique style now). Sorry I’m not staying focused on the OP topic am I?