Anheuser-Busch to Produce Stella Artois in the United States

Discussion in 'Beer News & Releases' started by jesskidden, Feb 10, 2021.

  1. jesskidden

    jesskidden Poo-Bah (2,281) Aug 10, 2005 New Jersey
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    Official AB-InBev Press Release:
    As Part of Overall $1 Billion Investment to Boost Economic Recovery, Anheuser-Busch Will Produce Stella Artois in the United States


    This follows the lead of AB-InBev moving Bass Ale, Beck's Beer and St. Pauli Girl sold in the US market to AB's domestic breweries over last decade or so. Stella Artois is (well, "was") something like the 4th best selling imported beer in the US, climbing to that level within the couple of decades.
     
    #1 jesskidden, Feb 10, 2021
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2021
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  2. Foyle

    Foyle Meyvn (1,045) Sep 29, 2007 North Carolina

    Since it is going to be brewed domestically they should bottle it in 12 oz instead of the rip off 11.2 oz European version. (I won't hold my breath waiting for that change)
     
  3. Troy-Hawaii

    Troy-Hawaii Meyvn (1,111) Jun 15, 2015 Hawaii

    I don't like when brewers do this as the beer does not taste the same. Maybe the water used or the environment has something to do with it, but I'm not sure. Try a beer made in the origin country versus the one made in the US or Canada and it becomes a different beer, for the worse. We get Asahi made in Japan and the cheaper one made in Canada and its a really different beer. What makes it worse is when they say "Imported" and you assume they mean imported from Japan, but find out its imported from Canada. Not sure if they stopped doing that, but I don't buy the Canadian version any more.
     
  4. MNAle

    MNAle Poo-Bah (2,190) Sep 6, 2011 Minnesota
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    It only seems like a rip off. It is the standard beverage size. 12 oz in the USA; 330 ml in Europe.

    I suppose the British consider the US pint to be a rip off, too. :rolling_eyes:

    (Or, all Europeans, since it is only 473ml, not the standard 500ml.)
     
    #4 MNAle, Feb 11, 2021
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2021
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  5. BeerDrinkinGuy

    BeerDrinkinGuy Initiate (59) Nov 2, 2018 Minnesota

    It is true about tasting different. Breweries claim the water is treated to mimic the original source so there is nothing different in terms of flavor but there have been people swearing on their mothers grave they can tell the difference when the beer has been brewed at a different location.
     
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  6. hopfenunmaltz

    hopfenunmaltz Poo-Bah (1,859) Jun 8, 2005 Michigan
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    Qb,.
    Budweiser is successfully brewed across the US with the same flavor. Beyond the water, equipment and process must be the same, or compensated for.

    It is funny that few ever mention how breweries go through flavor matching trials and dump batches when a larger system is installed at the same brewery, using the same water and ingredients.
     
  7. billandsuz

    billandsuz Devotee (489) Sep 1, 2004 New York

    They have put so much Belgium in the branding of Stellar Trois. Moving production to the US is going to have the shirts in marketing working overtime. It will now be "Inspired by the great brewing traditions of Belgium" or some shit. They like the word "uncompromising" a hell of a lot too.

    They are doing it to boost economic recovery. Applause all around. In America I suppose. So the breweries that used to make Stella for export, they can go fuck themselves. AB-InBev is a funny foreign company that way.

    As it is, they put the disingenuous "Anno 1366", the only Latin on the label, trying to convey some very thin line of continuity.

    Beer branding is crazy. AB-InBev is the King of Crazy.

    Cheers
     
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  8. steveh

    steveh Poo-Bah (3,101) Oct 8, 2003 Illinois
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    For what this is worth, I was at a grocery with liquor today and did a quick-check on Beck's (now brewed Stateside) -- 12 ounce bottles. You can probably exhale now. :wink:

    Funny thing is, Spaten is owned by AB-InBev, still brewed in Munich, but the bottles they send us are 12 ounce -- so never assume.
     
  9. Foyle

    Foyle Meyvn (1,045) Sep 29, 2007 North Carolina

    I realize that 330ml/11.2 oz is standard size in Europe -- I just find it irritating when 'imports' brewed in the US are kept at the 11.2 oz size but sold at the same price as 12 oz bottles. If the price was 7% lower then I would be fine with.

    As to pints -- I am 100% in favor of replacing the US 16 oz Pint with the 19.2oz Imperial Pint :grin:

    In my ideal world, more beer per serving is always better than less beer.
     
  10. Ranbot

    Ranbot Defender (653) Nov 27, 2006 Pennsylvania

    In addition to what @hopfenunmaltz said... If you're tasting a real difference between overseas vs domestically brewed versions of AB beers consider too which is likely to be fresher. Maybe you were accustomed to drinking a slightly stale beer? Freshness matters.
     
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  11. jesskidden

    jesskidden Poo-Bah (2,281) Aug 10, 2005 New Jersey
    Society Trader

    A couple versions of AB's new label for the domestically-brewed Stella Artois (I guess they did a few different designs so their legal team could check them out, since they've experience a few class action suits over the other formerly-imported brands, like Kirin and Beck's).
    Note that though the top one lists only "St. Louis", it is approved for all 12 AB breweries.
    [​IMG]
    And that date refers to the founding of a predecessor brewery:
    ...even they admit that the beer Stella Artois dates from 1920's (sometimes, if you check the fine print):
    US Brewing "What if..." trivia related to Stella Artois:
    For a time in the 1980s, Coors was the importer of Stella Artois in the US (I swear I have an ad somewhere from that period, but can't locate it.:grimacing:)
    By the end of that same decade, when Stroh Brewery, Inc. was failing, a few different large brewers looked into buying the firm, including Stella Artois (soon to become Interbrew) but they backed off when Coors made a deal with Stroh. Coors later backed out of merger over DoJ Anti-trust concerns. They did wind up buying the Schlitz/Stroh brewery in Memphis.
     
    #11 jesskidden, Feb 11, 2021
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2021
  12. officerbill

    officerbill Champion (820) Feb 9, 2019 New York
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    Why ever even mention that it's no longer imported?
    [​IMG]
     
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  13. deanzaZZR

    deanzaZZR Initiate (175) Jan 8, 2015 California

    A few months back I picked up a 12 pack of Kirin brewed by A-B in a facility in Southern California because it was priced really low (around $12 if I remember correctly). In no way shape or form did it taste like the Kirin (Ichiban Shibori) that is available across Japan which I fine crisp, highly drinkable and a fine companion to food there. This Kirin product is all malt in Japan. I highly doubt that is the same case with Kirin brewed by A-B in the US.
     
  14. grantcty

    grantcty Initiate (136) Feb 17, 2008 Minnesota
    Trader

  15. jesskidden

    jesskidden Poo-Bah (2,281) Aug 10, 2005 New Jersey
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    Well, one reason is that they got sued over the first domestic Beck's label (circa 2011) but the 2014 "fix" was just darker ink on the fine print on the bottom:
    [​IMG]
    As part of that lawsuit, I got me a nice check since I saved the receipt for that first single can of domestic Beck's I bought at time:
    [​IMG]
    That Kirin - Anheuser-Busch deal dates back to the mid-1990s (at the same time, Kirin was brewing Budweiser for the Japanese market). The interesting thing about it was AB Van Nuys brewed Kirin Ice Beer for the Japanese market, because they had the equipment for making ice beer since they were doing Bud Ice Draft there.
     
    #15 jesskidden, Feb 11, 2021
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2021
  16. steveh

    steveh Poo-Bah (3,101) Oct 8, 2003 Illinois
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    Especially since they kept the green bottles. :rolling_eyes::grin:
     
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  17. jesskidden

    jesskidden Poo-Bah (2,281) Aug 10, 2005 New Jersey
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    For that "Authentic Imported Flavor".
     
  18. steveh

    steveh Poo-Bah (3,101) Oct 8, 2003 Illinois
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    Do you suppose they put the six-packs on the deck of a ship and run it around through Panama and up the opposite coast just for more authenticity? :laughing:
     
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  19. deanzaZZR

    deanzaZZR Initiate (175) Jan 8, 2015 California

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  20. jesskidden

    jesskidden Poo-Bah (2,281) Aug 10, 2005 New Jersey
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  21. billandsuz

    billandsuz Devotee (489) Sep 1, 2004 New York

    Maybe maize was in the original 1366 recipe and they want to be historically accurate?
    That's probably the reason for maize. Historic accuracy. Why else mention that there was a brewery in a town that is the very same town where Stella originated? The connection is clear. Historic accuracy.

    But "Noble" did not come around until much later, so much confusion.
    Cheers
     
    #21 billandsuz, Feb 12, 2021
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2021
  22. billandsuz

    billandsuz Devotee (489) Sep 1, 2004 New York

    Then there is this.

    European kegs are typically 50 liters, which is 13.2 gallons, 2.3 gallons less than a domestic. Or more than 18 pints of not sold beer. Put it another way, at a modest $5 margin per pint there is $90 in lost sales per keg.
    And if you look at a Euro keg it is pretty difficult to see that they are smaller if you don't know.

    Pay a premium price for a pasteurized keg of old beer and you don't even get a full keg.
    The distributor is not making a point of this discrepancy. They don't lie and say it is a 15.5 gallon keg but they sure don't make a point of it.

    Cheers
     
  23. jesskidden

    jesskidden Poo-Bah (2,281) Aug 10, 2005 New Jersey
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    Nah, that can't be it since they didn't have "maize" in Europe before they "discovered" the New World... in fact, IIRC my history correctly Columbus was looking for a good brewing adjunct when he set sail towards the east hoping to bring back "all the rice in China", right - so the Italian brewing industry could compete with Germany's? That's why they named the beer in honor of him:
    [​IMG]
    I guess one has to be of a certain (old) age to remember a margarine commercial featuring a Native American (or, more likely, an actress playing one) who noted that the product was made from... "maize, but you call it 'corn' ".
     
  24. billandsuz

    billandsuz Devotee (489) Sep 1, 2004 New York

    You're thinking of the Pilgrims. They landed on Plymouth rock because they ran out of corn to make beer. Jim Koch made "Golden Pilgrim Slaughter" in the 80's based on the original maize recipe but it was not successful outside of Boston IIRC.
     
  25. unlikelyspiderperson

    unlikelyspiderperson Poo-Bah (1,867) Mar 12, 2013 California
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    If I'm remembering my history correctly, I believe Stella Artois was (pretty much) brewed for the first time (basically) in 1366 to celebrate the arrival in Belgium (or thereabouts) of Montezuma. He brought the.brewers of Europe maize and they gave him Saaz hops, and that's why they're "noble" hops.

    Montezuma went back to Mexico (basically what they called.it back then) and brewed the first cacao and chili and cinnamon stout and that beer is (more or less) what we know today as Abraxas.
     
  26. steveh

    steveh Poo-Bah (3,101) Oct 8, 2003 Illinois
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    The Pilgrims were landed on Plymouth Rock by the crew of the Mayflower because the crew was running low on booze and wanted to get back to England before they got the shakes. :wink:

    Jess' post has its backbone of satire, but he's right about maize being a North American crop that migrated to Europe.

    https://drinks.seriouseats.com/2012...r-thanksgiving-lager-prohibition-history.html
     
    #26 steveh, Feb 12, 2021
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2021
  27. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (5,120) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
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    I suppose you will next tell us about the talking margarine commercial?

    Cheers!
     
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  28. billandsuz

    billandsuz Devotee (489) Sep 1, 2004 New York

    The Land O Lakes sitting Indian is legendary in advertising. I won't post the image on the slight chance this forum still has family values, but you can Google Land O Lakes and boobs. It's a Mad Magazine trick.

    Cheers
     
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  29. jesskidden

    jesskidden Poo-Bah (2,281) Aug 10, 2005 New Jersey
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    Well, I don't want to blow up your theory, but then were does the "Nobel Prize" come in? (Not to be confused with the chicken casserole dish, "Pullet Surprise").

    Are you thinking of the talking frogs?

    (But as far as famous US margarine brands go -
    Was "I Can't Believe it's Not Butter" manufactured by the same company that made the "I Can't Believe it's a Girdle" ?)
     
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  30. unlikelyspiderperson

    unlikelyspiderperson Poo-Bah (1,867) Mar 12, 2013 California
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    Isn't that the prize named after the Italian fellow who invented dry hopping pale lager beers?
     
  31. steveh

    steveh Poo-Bah (3,101) Oct 8, 2003 Illinois
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    *Exploding* hoppy pale lager beers. :wink:
     
  32. Bitterbill

    Bitterbill Poo-Bah (7,861) Sep 14, 2002 Wyoming
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    The only Land O Lakes I ate was the butter.

    Re the OP's post, you all wanted fresh imports, and who doesn't, so we end up with the next "best" thing. :wink:
     
  33. jesskidden

    jesskidden Poo-Bah (2,281) Aug 10, 2005 New Jersey
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    From the above:
    AB was also including the story in their anti-Prohibition ads in the 1900s (top left article is from the highlighted area of the full page Budweiser ad in the Boston Globe) , and after Repeal, AB was not the only brewer using the tale - Boston's Croft Brewing Co. even was going by the 'dba' of Pilgrim Brewing Co. (center ad).
    [​IMG]
     
  34. ccwaterback

    ccwaterback Initiate (0) Feb 12, 2021

    Asahi is not brewed in Canada. You must mean Sapporo (owner of Sleeman in Guelph, Ontario).
     
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  35. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (5,120) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
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    And in all fairness these beers might be that next "best" thing if the American breweries take all necessary steps to properly 'recreate' the beer.

    A challenge is that the configuration of the American brewery is likely to be different from the present day brewery but steps can be taken to create consistent product. Even today Stella Artois is brewed a differing locations:

    "Stella Artois was originally brewed in Leuven, Belgium, a small city east of Brussels. Currently the best-selling beer in Belgium, it’s also brewed around the world, including in the U.K. and Australia."

    https://vinepair.com/articles/stella-artois/

    Hopefully what was learned in brewing Stella Artois at non-Belgium locations can be leveraged to improve the brewing of Stella Artois in an American brewery. And hopefully the American breweries will continue to ferment Stella Artois with the Stella Artois lager yeast stain vs. taking the 'easy way out' and just use their house yeast strain instead.

    Cheers!
     
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  36. deanzaZZR

    deanzaZZR Initiate (175) Jan 8, 2015 California

    Which is crap as well. :wink:. Sapporo is better in Japan but if you are reaching for a Sapporo beer product over there I suggest Yebisu which is all malt.
     
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  37. steveh

    steveh Poo-Bah (3,101) Oct 8, 2003 Illinois
    Society

    The Native American woman was on the butter package (note the proper use of past tense :wink:).
     
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  38. officerbill

    officerbill Champion (820) Feb 9, 2019 New York
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    Hello @ccwaterback and welcome to BA. Pull up a chair and join in.
    [​IMG]
    You're right (at least for the ones sold in the US) Kirin brewed in California and Sapporo in Ontario.
     
  39. jesskidden

    jesskidden Poo-Bah (2,281) Aug 10, 2005 New Jersey
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    Well, not all of it - some is brewed in Italy.:grin:
    [​IMG]
    ... and Wisconsin by City and in California at Gordon Biersch and at the Saporro-owned Anchor brewery in SF.
    [​IMG]
     
    #39 jesskidden, Feb 12, 2021
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2021
  40. deanzaZZR

    deanzaZZR Initiate (175) Jan 8, 2015 California

    You might have missed a county @jesskidden :wink:. I actually went to the Sapporo USA website because 4% ABV seems too low. The closest one listed on the site is Sapporo Lite (never see it) at 3.9%.
    [​IMG]
     
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