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Anybody else making Half & Halfs (Ale & Stout) at home?

Discussion in 'Beer Talk' started by coopdog1000, Jan 31, 2019.

  1. coopdog1000

    coopdog1000 Aspirant (283) Feb 22, 2014 Florida

    I've had the best luck with a strong IPA and a Guinness Stout or Draft bottles.

    It really ads another dimension to the art of beer drinking.
     
  2. bbtkd

    bbtkd Poo-Bah (2,278) Sep 20, 2015 South Dakota
    Society Trader

    A stout is an ale. I've mixed an Avery Nuttiest Professor Peanut Stout and an Atwater Decadent Dark Chocolate Brown Ale. I figured this would taste like a peanut butter cup. The nose is there, and the taste is pretty good too. Both beers have nutty taste. Not bad. If I could review this, I would give the nose a 4.50 and the taste a 4.25.

    [​IMG]
     
    #2 bbtkd, Jan 31, 2019
    Last edited: Jan 31, 2019
  3. coopdog1000

    coopdog1000 Aspirant (283) Feb 22, 2014 Florida

    I think the idea is to stack them all fancy like.
     
  4. mambossa

    mambossa Initiate (137) Jun 30, 2015 Ohio

    I never got it to float, but I did Speedway Stout and Jackie O’s Mandala Citra a few years back. It was absolutely bonkers. And consequently got me really messed up.
     
  5. dcotom

    dcotom Poo-Bah (2,065) Aug 4, 2014 Iowa
    Society Trader

    I tried this with an Evil Twin Yin and an Evil Twin Yang and I couldn't get them to separate cleanly. I wound up with a murky concoction that was a little bit lighter in color toward the bottom of the glass. (It was also quite good.) That might have been due to poor technique. That said, why not stick with the classics? Guinness Draught and Bass Ale. Works like a charm, and is damn tasty besides.

    [​IMG]
     
  6. jesskidden

    jesskidden Meyvn (1,409) Aug 10, 2005 New Jersey

    That was not always the case:
    [​IMG]

    Nor did "Half and Half" refer only to a Stout/Ale mix (obviously, no "fancy stacking" with the packaged beers):
    [​IMG]
     
  7. bbtkd

    bbtkd Poo-Bah (2,278) Sep 20, 2015 South Dakota
    Society Trader

    Mine were stacked, but were the same color :wink:
     
  8. bbtkd

    bbtkd Poo-Bah (2,278) Sep 20, 2015 South Dakota
    Society Trader

    I like how the ad said to pour half a glass of Guinness into half a glass of beer. The implication is that Guinness is superior to "beer".
     
  9. DVMin98

    DVMin98 Site Editor (2,803) Nov 1, 2010 North Carolina
    Society Trader

    I accidently poured half and half in my beer. It sucked
     
  10. nc41

    nc41 Poo-Bah (1,704) Sep 25, 2008 North Carolina
    Trader

    I love when you get that first breakthrough of Harp, I agree it’s classic.
     
    dcotom likes this.
  11. marquis

    marquis Crusader (764) Nov 20, 2005 United Kingdom (England)

    Practically all pubs in the UK have signs on the walls advertising "Ales and Stouts" because of the two distinct industries of Ale brewing and Stout (aka Porter) brewing. To call Stout an Ale is like calling a Canadian an American.
     
    LuskusDelph and Ceddd99 like this.
  12. jesskidden

    jesskidden Meyvn (1,409) Aug 10, 2005 New Jersey

    Ah, but which "half and half"?
    This kind'll get you a shandy.
    These'll get you an early 20th century "fake news" (well, let's hope so) cream ale.
    [​IMG]
    Well, they are fermented with top-fermenting yeast but if you wandered into a bar and asked "Oh, just give me whatever ale is on tap..." and you were served a Guinness Draught, you'd probably be disappointed.

    Those two brands have been popular to mix for a long time, but the beers themselves? Pretty different. Nitrogenized, low abv Guinness Draught and whatever bastardized version of Bass Ale that AB is brewing in New Hampshire... probably make a different beer than a century ago :wink::
    [​IMG]
    ... or even the "beer" and FES mixes Guinness promoted in post-Repeal US noted above.
    Really? Not sure about "superior" - don't most "Bourbon & branch" drinkers add the water to the bourbon? :grin: But likely Guinness and their US importers certainly felt their stout was superior to the typical American adjunct lagers most drinkers used for mixing at the time. (Below their 1930s era ad even say "Even better is Guinness straight."):
    [​IMG]
     
  13. zid

    zid Savant (968) Feb 15, 2010 New York
    Trader

    One just has to look at @jesskidden 's first post above (#6) to see marketing examples of "ale and beer" or "ale and porter."
     
    LuskusDelph likes this.
  14. JrGtr

    JrGtr Disciple (375) Apr 13, 2006 Massachusetts

    120 minute and world wide stout. (yeah, not really....)
    I've done black & tans on occasion - including one memorable tailgate with a friend of mine, but not as a regular occurrence.
     
  15. Ahonky

    Ahonky Initiate (143) Feb 13, 2018 New York

    A stout is a stout. History says so.
     
    LuskusDelph and Ceddd99 like this.
  16. Ahonky

    Ahonky Initiate (143) Feb 13, 2018 New York

    That actually looks quite tempting. I heard Bass is a tragedy today - but I wish that were not the case, as I used to really like it. Is this true? Haven't seen it around in eons
     
    Ceddd99 and dcotom like this.
  17. honkey

    honkey Zealot (549) Aug 28, 2010 Arizona
    Society Industry

    That actually is the only blend I've done in years.
     
    FBarber likes this.
  18. bbtkd

    bbtkd Poo-Bah (2,278) Sep 20, 2015 South Dakota
    Society Trader

    Canadians are North American...

    My reasoning on saying a stout is an ale is that Beer Advocate used to (up until the last style rework this past fall) list stouts and porters under ales. Anything not an ale was a lager. Did they change it because that's wrong? Other places I can find say that a stout is a porter, and they say a porter is an ale, so...

    Hell, it's all beer, I'm not brewing it, just drinking it.
     
    Milktoast75 likes this.
  19. NYRunner

    NYRunner Initiate (42) Nov 5, 2018 New York

    Fun fact: Otto von Bismarck used to consume vast amounts of his own favorite half & half or black & tan, which was equal parts dark German lager and champagne, served in a beer stein. I believe it's also called a Black Velvet.
     
    FBarber and dcotom like this.
  20. coopdog1000

    coopdog1000 Aspirant (283) Feb 22, 2014 Florida

    I have a vintage graphic design background... & those labels are killing me!
    I had no idea that pre mixed half and halfs were a thing.
    I bartended in an indy live music place in the mid nineties and it was just draft guinness and bass. I like it much better with an IPA.
     
  21. guinness77

    guinness77 Meyvn (1,046) Jan 6, 2014 New York

    You need a can or bottle with a draught cartridge and a spoon to properly layer the stout over the ale.
     
    SFACRKnight likes this.
  22. guinness77

    guinness77 Meyvn (1,046) Jan 6, 2014 New York

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    3 Half-and-Half’s that I still have pics of on my phone. I drank Guinness and Harp throughout my 20s. You think my username is a joke?
     
  23. Ceddd99

    Ceddd99 Initiate (121) May 14, 2018 Michigan
    Trader

    I don't know if I'd call it a tragedy (although I've never had the old version) but it's average at best in my opinion. I'm a big fan of English pale ales but I have no desire to drink Bass.
     
  24. Troutbeerbum

    Troutbeerbum Initiate (156) Dec 5, 2016 Maine

    I know it's not what you asked, but my girlfriend's father has always mixed Bock and lagers. I have yet to try it.
     
  25. SFACRKnight

    SFACRKnight Meyvn (1,282) Jan 20, 2012 Colorado
    Trader

    I like to call em black and tans, that way the Irish catholic in ne gets great satisfaction when I smash em....
     
  26. jesskidden

    jesskidden Meyvn (1,409) Aug 10, 2005 New Jersey

    Ah, but for a time in the 1970-90s, when what was then called "Guinness-Harp Corp." (and even later in the '90s "Guinness-Bass Importers") was also the US importer of Bass Ale, the Bass labels did read "I.P.A." in small letters.
    [​IMG]

    I "blame" that era's heavy promotion by the importer for the belief tjat many still hold that a "Half & Half" is only Guinness & Harp, and a "Black & Tan" is always Guinness Stout and Bass Ale...
     
    LuskusDelph and FBarber like this.
  27. marquis

    marquis Crusader (764) Nov 20, 2005 United Kingdom (England)

    They were called Black and Tans long before the Troubles. Nothing to do with the much later unpleasant forces of the same name.
     
  28. SFACRKnight

    SFACRKnight Meyvn (1,282) Jan 20, 2012 Colorado
    Trader

    But they indeed share the same name. The swastika wasn't always a sign of hate either, and its use dates back thousands of years prior, but the most recent iteration is the one we associate with the swastika.
     
  29. LiamoMill

    LiamoMill Initiate (42) May 11, 2017 Ireland
    Trader

    This is a funny one as in Ireland Bass these days isn’t served in many bars. A Black and Tan will generally always be Guiness with Smithwicks.
     
  30. VoodooBear

    VoodooBear Devotee (417) Aug 25, 2012 Puerto Rico
    Trader

    Oh hell yeah... My favorite black and tan is Samuel Smith's Strawberry Ale and Chocolate Stout. Works with the Raspberry Ale too.
     
  31. bleakies

    bleakies Disciple (347) Apr 11, 2011 Massachusetts

    Recently I've picked up several successive packs of Berkshire Brewing's Shabadoo, a non-striated half and half. (Part of the proceeds are donated to a western Mass food bank, as I recall, which allows my loutish drunkenness to serve the common weal.) I quite like the beer but miss the look of a properly poured version.

    https://www.beeradvocate.com/beer/profile/33/2369/

    Half and halfs (which I called black and tans) were my go to bevvy for years at the Plough and Stars in Cambridge, Mass. It taught me to be a consistently good tipper in appreciation of the extra bit of labor involved in serving one up properly. Lovely drink.
     
  32. Milktoast75

    Milktoast75 Devotee (416) Oct 27, 2012 Wisconsin
    Society

    Bass Ale was my first jump to quality beer. Drank the hell out of it, especially on tap.I have not a a Bass in years. With just a quick search, Bass is a domestic and an import? How could be being purchased by a mega giant corporation be bad? Sheesh!
    From Wikipedia:
    “The beer was produced under licence by Coors, which acquired the Bass brewery facility. Bass Brewers Limited was renamed Coors Brewers Limited. When the licence to brew draught Bass came to an end in 2005, it was taken up by Wolverhampton & Dudley Breweries PLC, which started production at Burton's Marston's Brewery. Bottled and keg Bass formerly exported to the USA with a higher alcohol content are now produced there domestically by Anheuser-Busch at a Baldwinsville, New York, facility.”
     
  33. Giantspace

    Giantspace Defender (686) Dec 22, 2011 Pennsylvania

    It’s called a heaven and hell.

    Enjoy
     
    JrGtr likes this.
  34. jesskidden

    jesskidden Meyvn (1,409) Aug 10, 2005 New Jersey

    Well, no - it's obviously one or the other, based on which country one is referring to. Bass's brewing business was bought by Interbrew (now ABInBev) in 2000 and the UK government made them sell off some of the company on anti-trust grounds, which is how MillerCoors wound up owning the brewery but ABInBev owns the brand.

    For the US market, Bass Ale (well, a product using that name) is brewed at AB breweries in Baldwinsville, NY and Merrimack, NH.
    [​IMG]
     
    Milktoast75 likes this.
  35. jesskidden

    jesskidden Meyvn (1,409) Aug 10, 2005 New Jersey

    Oops - slip of the finger there; obviously it is the other M____Coors, Molson Coors that owns and operates the former Bass brewery in Burton-on-Trent, UK and other parts of the company.
    [​IMG]
     
  36. marquis

    marquis Crusader (764) Nov 20, 2005 United Kingdom (England)

    I see that on the Bass label that it claims to be the world's first Pale Ale. Pale Ales date back well over a century before Bass. But the red triangle is, I believe, the world's earliest trade mark.
     
  37. Milktoast75

    Milktoast75 Devotee (416) Oct 27, 2012 Wisconsin
    Society

    Of course. Can’t be both. Duh. I was surprised and disappointed to learn that it is a domestic. No need to waste my money on revisiting Bass Ale.
    Thanks for the clarification.