Born On Date

Discussion in 'Beer Talk' started by Brainsalad, Apr 30, 2020.

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  1. Brainsalad

    Brainsalad Initiate (0) Apr 30, 2020

    Just picked up a keg of Mich Ultra and noticed the BOD is February 20. It's usually not that old and I'm assuming with all the bars being closed, not much beer is moving and I'm getting an older than usual run.

    Haven't tapped it yet, but wondered how critical the BOD is in kegs, as opposed to bottles/cans. Am I in for flat beer??????
     
  2. AZBeerDude72

    AZBeerDude72 Initiate (0) Jun 10, 2016 Arizona

    I would see about getting something fresher. I imagine most places are sitting on old stock, so right now buyer beware. I would not leave the store with any keg until date checked especially right now and with the loads of old beer going down the drains.
    Cheers
     
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  3. Mister_Faucher

    Mister_Faucher Initiate (0) Dec 3, 2014 Washington

    You should probably be ok. If it were say a porter or stout I would be more confident in my assumption.
     
  4. Brainsalad

    Brainsalad Initiate (0) Apr 30, 2020

    Thanks. I special order from a liquor store from their beer distributor, so I didn't think about having him check the date. I'm sure there's a lot of beer sitting around and this was probably unavoidable.

    Will find out tomorrow when I tap it.

    Will also be more careful next time.
     
  5. deleted_user_1007501

    deleted_user_1007501 Initiate (0) Jun 30, 2015

    Absolutely not. A keg is probably one of the best ways to preserve and pressurize beer. It will stay carbonated for years. It probably just won’t taste as fresh. Maybe even just a marginal difference.
     
  6. BBThunderbolt

    BBThunderbolt Poo-Bah (10,026) Sep 24, 2007 Kiribati
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    You'll be fine with that. IIRC, Inbev runs a 90 day (basically 3 months)BB date, and we're just 60ish in.

    Enjoy buddy, Cheers!
     
  7. marquis

    marquis Champion (825) Nov 20, 2005 England

    Beer is not born, it is brewed. In any case exactly when does this happen? At the mashing, the start or the end of fermentation or when it is put in containers?
     
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  8. BBThunderbolt

    BBThunderbolt Poo-Bah (10,026) Sep 24, 2007 Kiribati
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    There's an old saying: brewers make wort, yeast makes beer.

    Well, since yeast eats sugars to produce alcohol, it may well be fair to say that beer is born.

    Born as the lovechild of sugar and yeast.

    Just let OP enjoy his keg, OK?
     
  9. jesskidden

    jesskidden Poo-Bah (2,543) Aug 10, 2005 New Jersey
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    Didn't Anheuser Busch drop the "Born On" packaging dating and go to a "Freshest Before" best by date code several years ago? They still use the packaging date on kegs?
    Budweiser ditching 'born on date' on beer labels (May 2015)

    I thought it was 60 days (?) for draught, but a recent Wall Street Journal story A New Problem Is Brewing in the Beer Industry: One Million Kegs Are Going Stale said they were "extending" the keg shelf life.
     
  10. Brainsalad

    Brainsalad Initiate (0) Apr 30, 2020

    Thanks for all the input! Mich Ultra isn't my brew of choice, but you can't please everybody in the house (women watching their calories), so we keep that on tap and supplement with other local craft beers.

    Launch time is in around 10 hours, so will have everyone take a taste test and report back. Again, will remember to mention this to my beer guy next time I put in an order.

    Happy Friday!:sunglasses::beers:
     
  11. InVinoVeritas

    InVinoVeritas Devotee (441) Apr 16, 2012 Wisconsin

    The big manufacturers are worldclass at producing low dissolved oxygen. Additionally, Mich Ultra is low in hops. To put to perspective, I'm still enjoying my homebrew helles and Marzen from last year without issue. Big guys have far tighter controls, full QC lab and so on, than I do. It's fine, enjoy!
     
  12. nc41

    nc41 Poo-Bah (2,771) Sep 25, 2008 North Carolina
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    I cant imagine it still wouldn’t be right, curious about the keg, full barrel, 1/2 barrel? We’d have keg parties in my basement in HS 1973 give or take, I’d get a keg of Michelob for like $12 and it would be sideways in 3-4 hours. We’d play poker, meatball sandwiches, and we’d get drunk as hell, my parents were obviously home we didn’t sneak, my dad was an ex cop too, he’d come down and have a beer. Great times.
     
  13. MostlyNorwegian

    MostlyNorwegian Initiate (0) Feb 5, 2013 Illinois

    If this is trolling for kicks.
    Good one.
    The people at big honking corporate brewery will have tested it for flavor shift at this far of a date out from the fill date, and that is probably why you are still able to find it on market in the midst of this brouhaha. It will have sat at tap temp for it's entire life as well, because big honking corporate brewery demands it, so. Unless you are a beer judge. I'm not gonna suppose you're the type of drinker that will notice what the differences there may be in flavor.
     
  14. jesskidden

    jesskidden Poo-Bah (2,543) Aug 10, 2005 New Jersey
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    So consumers should ignore the brewers own dating systems and recommended shelf life periods?

    Full barrel of Michelob Ultra? As far as I know, no US brewer has used full barrels since the mid-1980s - and they were pretty rare before that.
    [​IMG]
     
  15. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (5,821) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
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    Please do.

    And enjoy your party!!

    Cheers!
     
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  16. AZBeerDude72

    AZBeerDude72 Initiate (0) Jun 10, 2016 Arizona

    I thought that kegs had a 45-60 day freshness maybe up to 90?
     
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  17. deleted_user_1007501

    deleted_user_1007501 Initiate (0) Jun 30, 2015

    Depends on style, and more subjectively what one’s personal definition of “fresh” is. It takes longer than you think for a keg to actively develop legitimate off-flavors directly related to age.
     
  18. jesskidden

    jesskidden Poo-Bah (2,543) Aug 10, 2005 New Jersey
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    [​IMG]

    ANHEUSER-BUSCH RESPONDS TO COVID-19
    ...because it just stands to reason that beer stays fresh longer during a pandemic :thinking_face:
     
  19. Brainsalad

    Brainsalad Initiate (0) Apr 30, 2020

    It's a half-barrel. Was just talking to a friend and forgot that he was in the beverage industry before he retired. He said it should be fine.

    And no, we're not overly discriminating drinkers.

    4 hours to launch:stuck_out_tongue:
     
  20. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (5,821) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
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    SCIENCE!

    [​IMG]
     
  21. nc41

    nc41 Poo-Bah (2,771) Sep 25, 2008 North Carolina
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    We used to buy the 1/2 barrels, but I remember parties with those gargantuan kegs of beer. Man they were insanely big, more beer than any of us could carry. But these pony kegs that are popular were 30 years in the future, and a lot of places in 1973 only carried Bud or Schaefer.
     
  22. jesskidden

    jesskidden Poo-Bah (2,543) Aug 10, 2005 New Jersey
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    Wow. I'd always read that Full Barrels, which weighted over 300 lbs were pretty much restricted to commercial establishments in later years, and tended to be limited to the local mid-west breweries after the 1960s or so. Never heard of a northeastern brewery having them that late (1970s) and available as "picnic" kegs. You don't remember what brand?

    True "Pony" kegs - 1/8 barrels - predated Prohibition (as did 1/6's) and were popular among many PA breweries into that era (Straub still had a few of them up until a few years ago).

    After the 1/8 "Pony" died, lots of people started calling 1/4's by that name, which is pretty confusing. To add to the confusion, 1/8's were also called "eighthels" or "eightels", just as the 1/6's today are again called "sixtels".

    Here's the Master Brewers Association of America's keg sizes w/nicknames, circa 1947:
    [​IMG]
     
    #22 jesskidden, May 1, 2020
    Last edited: May 1, 2020
  23. nc41

    nc41 Poo-Bah (2,771) Sep 25, 2008 North Carolina
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    My dad was a cop and they had an annual summer picnics. I was like 8-9 but that was in the mid 60s. Not a clue but they were ridiculous, they also had big barrels of birch beer too. My memory to dates are vague at best, just a memory.
     
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  24. Givemebeer

    Givemebeer Zealot (543) Apr 6, 2013 Vermont

    I haven’t been to this site in a long time. Good to see you’re still dropping knowledge.
     
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  25. readyski

    readyski Defender (606) Jun 4, 2005 California
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    Isn't the beer conceived when the brewer gets a certain gleam in their eyes? :slight_smile:
     
  26. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (5,821) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
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    There was an old thread where a number of BAs discussed their ‘remembrances’’ of beer served from a full barrel (31 gallons). @opwog @hopfenunmaltz @Giantspace etc.

    https://www.beeradvocate.com/community/threads/31-gallon-kegs.93735/

    BA opwog provided a link to an old newspaper article from 1984 that discussed that Hudepohl was discontinuing packaging in full barrels:

    https://news.google.com/newspapers?...W4xAAAAIBAJ&sjid=wwIEAAAAIBAJ&pg=3048,6608914

    And @jesskidden provided photos of labels of full barrel beers in the above thread.

    Cheers!
     
  27. nc41

    nc41 Poo-Bah (2,771) Sep 25, 2008 North Carolina
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    Now that I think of it what I bought for our basement keg parties we’re 1/4 barrels, like $12 for Miclelob. One event we had you had to literally spear it from the top that had a cork in it. The Budweiser had a screw in top and another place on the side close to the bottom to attach a line, but it had two hookups. These were pretty easy to deal with.
     
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  28. jesskidden

    jesskidden Poo-Bah (2,543) Aug 10, 2005 New Jersey
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    The thing about the Full Barrels, I think, is that they don't really look all that much bigger than a half (think in 2 dimension and back to sophomore year geometry* and finding the area of a circle and then one twice as large) but the weight of twice as much liquid!

    Here's a (poor) illustration of Heileman's 4 sizes (Full, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8) of wooden kegs in the 1940s and what I'm assuming is an actual Full Barrel of Schlitz celebrating one of the years as #1 in the US.
    [​IMG]

    As for the relative rarity of the Full Barrel in later decades, in 1973 it was reported that in Pennsylvania they consumed 3,558,483 Halfs, 591,351 Quarters and 3,281 Fulls. So, Halfs:Fulls was 1,000 to 1.

    Pretty sure in NJ in 1964 there are no Full Barrels sold - at least, on a retail consumer level.
     
  29. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (5,821) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
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    Well then, cheers to Hudepohl for lasting until 1984 with their full barrels.

    Roll out the barrel, we'll have a barrel of fun!:beers:

    Cheers!
     
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  30. Brainsalad

    Brainsalad Initiate (0) Apr 30, 2020

    OK, so just tapped the keg. BTW, not for a party, we just keep it on tap; "Weekend Warriors". Half Barrel usually lasts 1-3 months, depends on how many neighbors stop by.

    The wife actually thought it was fine, and she's the one that usually complains about brew quality. Son and Daughter (22 & 20) said it didn't taste fresh, but OK. I thought it was fine.

    Overall give it an B+

    Definitely will explore getting a fresh one next time, but in the grand theme of things these days, beer quality is a low priority, so stay safe out there, folks and HAPPY WEEKEND :sunglasses:
     
  31. Junior

    Junior Champion (853) May 23, 2015 Michigan
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    How fresh do you normally buy them?
     
  32. Giantspace

    Giantspace Meyvn (1,049) Dec 22, 2011 Pennsylvania


    Never had Ultra but I got a 12 pack that was curbside and it’s dated October 2019. It’s mostly IPA. I had one beer the other night and it’s really not so bad. The other 2 IPA I’ve not tested yet. Hope they are still decent.

    Guessing your keg should be ok.

    Enjoy
     
  33. deleted_user_1007501

    deleted_user_1007501 Initiate (0) Jun 30, 2015

    “You see, when Mr. Wort and Mrs. Yeast really love each other....”
     
  34. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (5,821) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
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    You deserve a Nobel Prize here! Makes waaaay more sense that the combo of birds & bees!!:astonished:

    Cheers!
     
  35. deleted_user_1007501

    deleted_user_1007501 Initiate (0) Jun 30, 2015

    Except for when the kid goes, “So... Mom ate dad and then farted me out?”

    Y’know...there’s a lot to unpack from that now that I’ve read it over...
     
  36. marquis

    marquis Champion (825) Nov 20, 2005 England

    Not that many years ago Holts of Manchester were still delivering beer in hogsheads which are 54 UK gallons.
    Belvoir Brewery was using full barrels (36 UK gallons) a few years ago but like most other craft breweries would be using firkins.
    Barrels have three drawbacks, they depend on rapid sales, they are massively heavy and they only contain one beer. Most pubs prefer to buy four different brews in firkins.
     
  37. Brainsalad

    Brainsalad Initiate (0) Apr 30, 2020

    Before I special ordered kegs, I bought from a place where you could go into a huge cooler and load your own keg. They always rotated them, so I'd push my way to the back of the stock and get them sometimes with a BOD of 2-3 weeks.

    Have been special ordering now for just a year or so, and actually haven't paid attention to the BOD. My son brought it to my attention when we were bringing it in.

    BTW, readyski: Love your "gleam in the eye" comment!:grin::grin::grin:
     
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