Bottle refermenting after lagering - necessary to pitch into warm beer?

Discussion in 'Homebrewing' started by koopa, May 6, 2013.

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  1. koopa

    koopa Poo-Bah (1,825) Apr 20, 2008 New Jersey
    Beer Trader

    I've had a Belgian Strong Golden Ale lagering for about 2 months now and tomorrow I plan on bottling 5 gallons into 750ml corked and caged bottles tomorrow. For added carbonation insurance, I'm planning on pitching 1/4 pack of dry yeast in the bottling bucket along with the priming solution. Normally I would rehydrate the dry yeast at around 85F for roughly 20 minutes prior to pitching it into 65F wort. But I've been lagering my BSGA so its 35F. Won't I shock the rehydrated yeast if I pitch it into 35F beer? Should I leave the carboy out on the counter overnight so that the wort reaches room temperature prior to pitching the additional dry yeast?
     
  2. VikeMan

    VikeMan Meyvn (1,416) Jul 12, 2009 Pennsylvania
    Beer Trader

    I would definitely allow the beer to warm up to bottle conditioning temps before adding the yeast, rather than shocking 85F yeast in 35F beer.
     
  3. koopa

    koopa Poo-Bah (1,825) Apr 20, 2008 New Jersey
    Beer Trader

    Thank you for confirming my suspicion. In retrospect, it was nothing more than a battle between the hopeful delusion that I could skip a step vs. common sense.
     
  4. PortLargo

    PortLargo Devotee (456) Oct 19, 2012 Florida

  5. KS1297

    KS1297 Initiate (0) Apr 14, 2013 Wisconsin

    This past winter I had a pilsner lagering the the basement at high 30s - low 40s for about three months. as it got warmer outside the temp slowly rose up to about 55F. Last week I bottled it and only added priming sugar, no yeast. Five days later i tried one and there was already some decent carbonation going on. I will try another one again this coming saturday, but as far as i can tell, extra yeast was not necessary. Your strain of yeast as well as other factors could be completely different though.
     
  6. koopa

    koopa Poo-Bah (1,825) Apr 20, 2008 New Jersey
    Beer Trader

    Thanks for the link. Carbonation target is about 2.8 levels of co2. Planning on using roughly 1oz of dextrose per gallon of beer.
     
  7. koopa

    koopa Poo-Bah (1,825) Apr 20, 2008 New Jersey
    Beer Trader

    Most people have the experience you did, but occasionally you do hear about the batch that just won't recarbonate on its own. The extra dry yeast is added insurance just in case that happens. Since I'm bottling this batch in corked and caged bottles, I definitely want the insurance.
     
  8. pweis909

    pweis909 Meyvn (1,453) Aug 13, 2005 Wisconsin
    Supporter Subscriber

    You can slow bring your rehydrate yeast to the beers temperature by slowly adding some of your beer to the slurry, a few teaspoons at a time, over 15-30 min. However, you don't want to do this with beer at 35 degrees. Let your beer come up to bottling temp over a few days, and then do this.
     
  9. koopa

    koopa Poo-Bah (1,825) Apr 20, 2008 New Jersey
    Beer Trader

    Thanks. I plan on putting the carboy out on the counter about 2.5 - 3 hours prior to pitching the yeast. Hoping that will be enough time for 5 gallons to come up from 35F to 65F. Actually since I have a chest freezer w/ a 2 stage heat controller and temperature probe, perhaps I'll just warm it up in the chest freezer. Either way, I hope 2.5 - 3 hours is enough time to jump 30F
     
  10. VikeMan

    VikeMan Meyvn (1,416) Jul 12, 2009 Pennsylvania
    Beer Trader

    I suspect that's not going to be long enough for ambient temps to bring your beer to 65F. Also, moving your carboy is going to undo some of what gravity has been doing for the last two months. If you have to move it, I'd recommend moving very carefully, and allowing more time to settle afterward... time you may need for the temp change anyway.
     
    PortLargo likes this.
  11. koopa

    koopa Poo-Bah (1,825) Apr 20, 2008 New Jersey
    Beer Trader

    I was worried about that (not warming up fast enough). My home brewery isn't at my own home and I'm trying not to show up there at 8am this morning before work but I guess I just may have to after all. I'm not really worried about sediment much though. After 2 months of lagering it is quite compact and anything that kicked up while moving the carboys will settle in less than 2.5 hours from my experience.
     
  12. PortLargo

    PortLargo Devotee (456) Oct 19, 2012 Florida

    This doesn't apply directly to what you are doing, but my last transfer from carboy to keg was direct, compliments of Mr. CO2 tank. I cold-crashed the carboy and never took it out of the freezer, just hooked up the lines and direct to the keg. No movement of the carboy and no gravity (or oxygen) involved.

    It would be great if you could update the Forum on how these 750s turn out.
     
  13. koopa

    koopa Poo-Bah (1,825) Apr 20, 2008 New Jersey
    Beer Trader

    I do direct transfers of cold beer to the keg via co2 pushing all the time when direct force carbonating hoppy beers. Definitely a great way to go in that scenario.

    I wound up going to my home brewery today in lieu of taking a lunch break so I got that carboy out on the counter around 12pm and will be bottling tonight around 8pm. I've got a nice Portuguese floor corker that I borrowed from my homebrew club ready to go! I'll report on the bottling experience soon. Then I'll probably open at least 1 bottle after a month of priming or so and try to report back. Then I'll move everything to cellar temps for extended conditioning.
     
  14. koopa

    koopa Poo-Bah (1,825) Apr 20, 2008 New Jersey
    Beer Trader

    Bottling was smooth tonight. Beer was 59F (after 8 hours of sitting in a 65F room) and I pitched the 1/4 sachet of re-hydrated yeast at 65F so I'm not too worried about shock. Primed 5 gallons with 5.14oz of dextrose which is roughly 143 grams. Got 21 x 750ml caged and corked bottles and 3 x 22oz bombers out of 5 gallons in the bottling bucket. Going to bottle carbonate it in the basement (65F) for 3-4 weeks. Basement will get a bit warmer over the next 3-4 weeks so that should help ensure proper carbonation.

    The old floor corker I used is actually Italian made and although I had to modify it slightly, I got it to work very well. This wine floor corker is designed to push the cork in further than I would want for a c&c belgian beer. So I pretty much just put a stopper on the end of the push piece and adjusted the normal nut until it pressed the cork in just right. Took 4 corks to get it just right but I had a pack of 25 and only had 21 belgian bottles so it worked out perfectly.
     
    PortLargo likes this.
  15. utahbeerdude

    utahbeerdude Disciple (372) May 2, 2006 Utah

    This sounds interesting. What is your setup for transferring beer in this manner?
     
  16. PortLargo

    PortLargo Devotee (456) Oct 19, 2012 Florida

    It's pretty easy, you just need the orange two-hole stopper that fits most all carboys. Inlet is a barb'ed CO2 line and outlet is a stainless racking cane attached to a beer line ending in a corny QD. Slowly (less than 4 psi) apply pressure to carboy and beer will flow through cane and fill your keg from the bottom (insert open gas QD to vent). Nothing touches the beer except CO2 and no need to have the keg below the carboy.

    You will probably have to fiddle with the right barbs, clamps, unions to get it all to work. The stopper doesn't hold pressure especially well, which is a good thing. If you have too much pressure in the carboy this is your vent before something really bad happens. It helps to have one hand for the cane, one hand to hold the stopper, and one hand to regulate the CO2. Transfer rate is similar to auto siphon. Not my invention, search youtube for videos.
     
  17. koopa

    koopa Poo-Bah (1,825) Apr 20, 2008 New Jersey
    Beer Trader

    Yup pretty much the same as what I do...

    1. Rubber carboy blow off hood on top of the carboy
    2. Gas line coming off of my co2 tank is connected to the side hole of the hood with a hose clamp
    3. Stainless racking cane goes through the middle hole of the hood and into the beer
    4. On the top end of the stainless racking cane, a vinyl transfer hose is connected with a hose clamp
    5. On the other end of that vinyl transfer hose is a hose barb and nut that will screw onto a black "beer side" QD
    6. Connect it to the black QD, then connect that black QD to the beer out post on the keg
    7. turn co2 gas on and keep it under 4 psi
    8. the gas will lightly pressurize the carboy and force wort up the racking cane, through the vinyl transfer hose, and into the keg via the beer out post.
    9. occasionally I will pull on the pressure release valve on the keg lid to allow the liquid to continue transferring into the keg
     
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