Brewers Edge Mash and Boil

Discussion in 'Homebrewing' started by DrMindbender, Feb 11, 2017.

  1. DrMindbender

    DrMindbender Savant (926) Jul 13, 2014 South Carolina

    [​IMG]
    Has anyone tried the Brewers Edge Mash and Boil setup yet? It seems similar to a Grainfather, but without a recirculation pump and chiller and at a reasonable price point of $299. I'm a BIAB brewer and have looked at a Grainfather, but it's too steep for me to justify...but this seems like a nice compromise, for a price I could go for. I'm curious about quality, pros, cons, problems or issues from anyone that has experience with this unit. Thanks!

    https://www.williamsbrewing.com/BREWERS-EDGE-MASH-BOIL--P4216.aspx?afid=14
     
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  2. DrMindbender

    DrMindbender Savant (926) Jul 13, 2014 South Carolina

    I took the plunge and ordered this unit yesterday. I'm still interested in other folks' experiences with this set up, so if you have any tips, pros or cons please post them up. I'll also keep anyone that is interested informed on my experiences as well. I should do my first brew with it next weekend as it wont be delivered in time for this weekend's brew.
     
  3. utahbeerdude

    utahbeerdude Devotee (419) May 2, 2006 Utah

    Looks like a good deal. I'll be interested to hear how well it works.
     
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  4. NeroFiddled

    NeroFiddled Poo-Bah (13,127) Jul 8, 2002 Pennsylvania
    Society Trader

    My main concern would be that, according to the directions I read, you're not recirculating your wort prior to sparging - although with that valve on the front you could do it. Additionally, if you're lifting your 'basket' of grain up you're not doing a floating sparge, and are just rinsing the sugars out of the grain which will compact the grain bed, possibly leaving sugars behind, or creating a stuck mash ~ and thus not getting as great of an efficiency as you might have otherwise. Other than that I'd say it's just the limitations of the amount of grain you can use, the type (I doubt you could do a 100% wheat beer, and I'd even question a standard Bavarian hefeweizen), and the fact that you're not heating directly which can be helpful for creating caramelization in Scottish ales and barleywines. Other than that, for doing straight forward ales and lagers it seems pretty decent.
     
  5. DrMindbender

    DrMindbender Savant (926) Jul 13, 2014 South Carolina

    I'm mainly a BIAB brewer nowadays, so I'll use a bag as well and do my usual rinse and squeeze method that nets me around 80-83% efficiency...so I'm not too worried about that. I'm not sure why different grains would make a difference except for if you use a ton of flaked oats that could gum things up. Can you explain why the type of grain could be limiting? I am not a hefe fan (or Scottish or Barleywines either, so caramelization is not a concern) but tend to do 100% wheat IPAs fairly often, so your statement has me confused. Thanks!
     
  6. NeroFiddled

    NeroFiddled Poo-Bah (13,127) Jul 8, 2002 Pennsylvania
    Society Trader

    Ahh, well if you're able to do a 100% wheat mash, as it is, you shouldn't have a problem. I'm just thinking traditionally, that a mash with a lot of wheat can be a sparging nightmare if it's not set up properly. And if you're using a bag within the system that should go even smoother. However, then the lack of a recirculation during the mash comes back into play. That would go more to clarity and longevity of the the beer though, and maybe that's not a concern. Now where's my "thumbs up" emoticon? :slight_smile: Good luck!
     
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  7. fuzzbalz

    fuzzbalz Disciple (339) Apr 13, 2002 Georgia

    I've been eyeing this also, keep us posted!!
     
  8. DrMindbender

    DrMindbender Savant (926) Jul 13, 2014 South Carolina

    Yesterday's Kolsch was the 3rd batch I've brewed on the Brewer's Edge Mash and Boil unit and after a little adjusting to the unit, I really like it! The one big negative to me is the increased brew day length due to the longer times to heat...I went from a 3.5-4 hr typical brew day to a 4.5-5 hour brew day, but this gives me a more relaxed brew day in comparison to the past where I was constantly going/doing/cleaning during the whole 3.5-4 hours.

    Here are a few notes I've collected so far...
    - It takes around 45-50 minutes to hit strike temp with 60-65 degree water
    - The thermostat is preset (and I havent figured out how to change it) to a 5 degree variation during the mash...so setting it at 150 means that the mash will drop down to 145 before it heats back up, and then it heats back up to 155 before the temp starts to fall again. It will cycle through the temp range in about 20-30 minutes, so it will reheat the mash once, maybe twice during a typical 60 minute mash. I found that stirring the mash at around 147 will bump the temp up around 5 degrees and limit the reheat to only once during the mash. I'm planning on making an insulation jacket for the unit, like the Grainfather's, to help keep the temp from varying so much. I thought this temp swing would be a bad thing the first time I used it, as I'm accustomed to keeping a very steady mash temp, but my conversion efficiency each time has been around 78% (I used a BIAB with the unit and squeezed the grains/bag once each brew). I haven't tasted any of the beer its made yet, so I cant speak to as if the temp variation effects the overall beer.
    - From the end of the mash to the boil, it takes another 45-50 minutes to heat up from 150-214.
    - I'm not using a pump and have no issues pouring directly from the unit's faucet into a fermenter and it aerates the wort nicely IMO. I dont see that I'll need a pump with this unit with the conversion efficiency and ease of transfer so far, although I may add a short section of hose to the spout so things are a little less messy.
    - Had an issue the first brew with either a hop bag touching the thermostat or with the unit overheating and causing an E4 error...I hit the reset button (bad location on the bottom of the unit, but wasnt too tough to reach after scooting unit to edge of counter) and in less than 5 minutes the unit was back heating/boiling my wort. I dropped the boil temp a degree and bought a large stainless steel hop spider that was delivered in between the first and second brew...I used it for the second and third brew and didnt have any issues at all with the E4 error again.
    - The recommended temp settings for the mash is 162 and the boil is 218...but I have found these temps to be too high. For a typical 10-12 pound grain bill, its better to set the mash temp at 159 or 160 instead of 162 or else you'll stay at around 158 for the first 5-10 minutes of the mash. I set the unit to 159 on the last brew with 9 lbs of grain and I hit 155 immediately after mashing in. I also think that the E4 error I got the first brew could have been due to the unit getting too hot overall during the boil, so I dropped the boil temp from 218 down to 217 and didnt have any problems. The 218 boil was very active/violent, almost too active but at 217 it seems just right for me.
    -Clean up is super easy as well...soap and water with a soft rag, a good rinse (and I like to sterilize too) and it still looks like new.

    Overall, I'm very pleased! I have been brewing with my previous method for 5 or so years and before that I had the same set up for 15+ years, so I am not accustomed to making this sort of change very often, but I found it to be relatively painless and simple to adjust. So far, it seems to be a great unit for indoor brewing and well worth the $300 price tag vs other self contained units or even the price of a nice kettle.

    If anyone has a specific question, let me know.
     
    #8 DrMindbender, Apr 11, 2017
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2017
  9. TooHopTooHandle

    TooHopTooHandle Initiate (0) Dec 20, 2016 New York

    @DrMindbender . Are you still happy with the unit? I am currently thinking about getting one of these. I just had a few questions. When doing this style with no sparge, are you just putting in the full water volume off the start? How are you cooling the wort? are you doing it in the unit or transferring it to a different vessel to chill? I like to do heavy whirl pool additions, will I have and issues with clogging when transferring ?
     
  10. Granitebeard

    Granitebeard Initiate (123) Aug 24, 2016 Maine

    I have been keeping an eye on this as well. This is becoming more of a good idea to me as I feel kind of sad going back to partial mashes for the winter. I might just pull the trigger at some point.
     
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  11. TooHopTooHandle

    TooHopTooHandle Initiate (0) Dec 20, 2016 New York

    I feel this is a very nice, compact way for indoor all grain brewing. So close to going for the purchase as well lol
     
  12. DrMindbender

    DrMindbender Savant (926) Jul 13, 2014 South Carolina

    I'm still happy...had a couple of issues I figured out and then haven't looked back. Possibly the best $300 I've ever spent on brewing really. I mash in around 5 gallons of water then pull the grain basket out, stack it on top as it's designed and allow it to drain into the unit (I actually add a brew in a bag and squeeze the grains as well). While it drains, I use a 1.5 liter electric water boiler to heat water up to 170ish and then wash/sparge the grains to get my preboil volume...then I hit the boil and go from there. I have chilled with an immersion chiller in the unit until my last batch, in which I switched to a counterflow chiller. I put all of my hops in a big hop spider/basket, so I don't have any issues with transferring, but if you add them directly to the boil, you might have issues.
     
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  13. TooHopTooHandle

    TooHopTooHandle Initiate (0) Dec 20, 2016 New York

    ok thank you for all the input :slight_smile: if you don't mind me asking, how much did the counter flow chiller and pump run you? and do you rec any specific brand/model
     
  14. DrMindbender

    DrMindbender Savant (926) Jul 13, 2014 South Carolina

    I got mine from Williams Brewing as well...bought the chiller and hose kit together and had it working in 15 minutes (link below). I dont run it with a pump, I simply gravity feed it through and into my fermenter. I have it hooked up to my kitchen sink and the cold water is 72 coming out of the tap...I run it at full blast and turn the valve on the Mash and Brew to around half open and the wort coming out in the first pass is around 78-82 degrees (started at above 200-210). I pitch my brett and funky beers around that temp, so that works for part of my homebrewery, but I am going to start immersion chilling my clean beers down to around 180 before I start running them through the counterflow chiller, to get it down to the same temps as my tap water before I pitch yeast/wort onto a yeast/bug cake.

    https://www.williamsbrewing.com/KEG-KING-COUNTERFLOW-WORT-CHILLER-P4391.aspx
     
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  15. ravenwork

    ravenwork Initiate (63) Mar 16, 2015 Pennsylvania

    Just brewed my first batch in my brand new unit, which arrived yesterday. It went well.

    Hats off to the entrepreneur, he quite obviously worked with a Chinese company that was already building good coffee urns. He recommended some minor adjustments, and got them a unit they can sell for twice the price of their coffee maker. I'm, sure everyone is happy, including me.

    There are some issues, but nothing that prevented me from making a nice batch of brown ale, so I am not complaining.

    I greatly enjoyed brewing indoors, with impressively efficient electric heating. The double-wall construction makes the 1600W of heating coils do a vigorous boil without significant loss of heat. The exterior of the unit does not get hot. I did need to place the lid on with a gap to maintain a good boil, but the gap was sufficiently large to allow for plenty of evaporation. I expect no DMS issues with the batch, even though it was mainly pilsner base malt.

    The unit has a fairly large dead volume at the bottom. I measured it at 2.5L. It actually did a decent job of leaving the trub and spent hops behind. It was a simple solution to an age-old problem. I think some modification could deal with it, but honestly, it probably works fine for most 20 L batches. It would be a major drawback for the half-batch the maker claims you can do though.

    The biggest issue for me is during the mash. This unit has a significant thermodynamic issue. When mashing, your grain bed is held in a static, stainless steel, mash tube, surrounded by a significant amount of wort. Stainless steel has poor ability to conduct heat. Water has an excellent ability to absorb heat. Consequently, the wort surrounding the mash tube will absorb most of the heat from mashing in, and it will also absorb most of the heat from the heating elements which are in the base of the vessel. I measured a significant difference in temperature between the unit's temperature sensor in the bottom of the vessel in the wort, and my temperature probe at the top of the grain bed. I did end up with 85% extraction efficiency, but I also drained about three liters of the wort every 15 minutes during mashing and poured it back over the top of the grain bed. If I hadn't gone to that trouble, I suspect my efficiency would have been lower. If you want to be able to accurately control mash temperature with this unit I think you need a re-circulation pump.

    All in all, I think this is good bang for the buck. I am not at all disappointed. I also think I will be modifying it with a pump for recirculation and to make sparging easier. Still, I will also end up lower on cost than the other available options.

    <engaging rant soapbox>
    One more thing, the unit cannot be switched to degrees Celsius. You may have already gathered that I prefer the metric system, so that is a disappointment. Since the unit was built in China, this seems absurd. I also know the electronics involved are essentially costless, but I've lived my whole life in a dunderheaded nation that selfishly uses a dumbass measurement system that is actually based upon the metric system. I guess I can continue to yoke on that stupid burden. <disengaging soapbox...>
     
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  16. DrMindbender

    DrMindbender Savant (926) Jul 13, 2014 South Carolina

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  17. ravenwork

    ravenwork Initiate (63) Mar 16, 2015 Pennsylvania

    Good to know, and thanks.

    Too bad the official Instruction Manual included with my unit contains no information about this at all, nor does the controller on the unit include any labeling indicating the ability to make the switch.
     
  18. Maestro0708

    Maestro0708 Initiate (0) Feb 27, 2015 Kentucky

    Would you guys recommend this system for someone making the step up to all grain brewing? I have been extract brewing for almost a year and I am eager to take the next step. This system seems like a good value! What do y'all think?
     
  19. DrMindbender

    DrMindbender Savant (926) Jul 13, 2014 South Carolina

    Definitely!
     
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  20. Noiz2

    Noiz2 Initiate (0) Jun 29, 2015 Michigan

    Not sure about your history since Imperial units are based off of units used in Ancient Rome and the Metric system came in the late 1700's. Metric does have math simplicity on it's side. At least you do't have to measure grain in stone, and hops in penny weight ;~)
     
  21. NGennaroL777

    NGennaroL777 Initiate (82) Aug 15, 2013 Massachusetts
    Trader

    Admittedly so, I haven't read every post in this thread, so forgive me if it's been answered already.

    I'm looking for a recirculation pump modification of items that I can be linked to and purchase, preferably on Amazon. I'll take any help I can get. Thanks!!
     
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  22. jbakajust1

    jbakajust1 Crusader (769) Aug 25, 2009 Oregon

    Got an amazing bonus from work this year. The wife actually seems keen on me getting this unit. I had poopooed these for so long, but with the business of life, the constant need to be "out in the brewery" to make sure there are no stuck sparges, over heating, boil overs, overflows, empty propane or blown out flames, etc... brewing has become difficult, not to mention all of the cleaning. Then I saw all this unit can do... preheat my strike water while I sleep or work, mash and maintain the temp, easy sparge, walk away boil ramping, and even ferment in it after chilling (if I wanted to). I already have a pump and CFC and IC so chilling and transferring, and recirculation should be easy.

    Couple things I have thought about getting with the unit: the fermentation lid and hook up some piping to go out the window during the boil instead of having the steam stay in the house. Also getting a hop sleeve for ease of removal.
     
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  23. jbakajust1

    jbakajust1 Crusader (769) Aug 25, 2009 Oregon

    Going to pick up mine tonight after work. Will brew with it after the holidays.
     
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  24. Granitebeard

    Granitebeard Initiate (123) Aug 24, 2016 Maine

    Please report you efficiencies back. A local guy here reports really low numbers, which is what puts me off from buying things like this. If you get good numbers and it is him somehow, I would like to know as it might help me choose to buy one.
     
  25. jbakajust1

    jbakajust1 Crusader (769) Aug 25, 2009 Oregon

    I'll be brewing with mine on New Year's Day, I'll let you know what I get. One thing I thought of doing was putting the basket into a bucket and pouring the sparge water over that, give it a nice stir, then pull it from the bucket to drain over the kettle. Kind of like a batch sparge. Also thought of pushing down the grains as they drain to get the most liquid from them as possible.

    Leaving the basket draining while it ramps up to a boil will also probably impact the efficiency as well.
     
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  26. Maestro0708

    Maestro0708 Initiate (0) Feb 27, 2015 Kentucky

    The key for me seems to have been grain crush. I was getting poor and inconsistent efficiencies with the M&B until I started milling my own grain. Now I've been getting better than 80%. Mill set to .035.
     
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  27. Granitebeard

    Granitebeard Initiate (123) Aug 24, 2016 Maine

    One guy has this locally and another has the robobrew. Both share a grain mill as they are neighbors. They report 70% tops, with recirculation. I heard that and figure and figured it was not worth the money. I figured that I would rather use they money saved to put to something to speed my current process. Never did that, but just making Maine winter brewing easier indoors has always been something I want to do.
     
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  28. Maestro0708

    Maestro0708 Initiate (0) Feb 27, 2015 Kentucky

    Just to follow up, I brewed my third batch today since getting my own mill and managed 83% efficiency. I feel confident I can hit that number consistently and im really pleased with those results. Grain crush has made all the difference in the world for me.
     
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  29. VikeMan

    VikeMan Poo-Bah (2,003) Jul 12, 2009 Pennsylvania
    Society

    If efficiency is a (big) concern, you could also do a quasi fly sparge, by suspending your basket over a bucket and rinsing the grains. If done carefully, it would likely yield efficiency higher than the basket/bucket batch sparge.

    (Not that I'm advocating fly sparging in general for home brewing. Most of my own batches are actually no-sparge.)
     
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  30. jbakajust1

    jbakajust1 Crusader (769) Aug 25, 2009 Oregon

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    Maiden voyage and second run went well. I actually hit 89% extract efficiency both times, much higher than others report, and much closer to my standard 92% that I get on my bigger 3 vessel system. Even though my "complaints" about some "design flaws" may seem like I don't like my investment, it is far from reality... I really love this vessel. Everything I take issue with are things that I wish were different for the way I want to use it, for ease of use on me, which is why I purchased this system. These might not be issues for you at all.

    [​IMG]



    Temperature settings are easy enough to use. I may just set them to the mash temp itself in the future instead of strike temp, add the grains, and stir as it brings back up to the mash temp. My reasoning is that it takes out the step of resetting the temp once the strike is achieved... if you miss this step the grains will bring the temp down and kick on the heating elements to bring it back to strike temp which is 10-12*F higher than the desired mash temp. I'd rather strike at 150, drop to 140, and bring back up to 150 as I stir to evenly distribute the grains and liquid, than strike at 160, drop to 150, forget to change the temp, and have it hit 160 while I stir leading to a less fermentable wort than planned for, and/or adding cold water to try to cool it back down.

    [​IMG]

    The temp probe on the bottom is very low key which is great, but also leads to possible false readings, especially in the mash (see two temp readings picture above). It seems that the liquid outside of the mash pipe remains hotter than the mash itself inside of it, by about 4-5*F. I found that to pull up the pipe and let it drain some then to resubmerge about 2-3 times, mixing the mash in between balanced out the temperature so it was evenly distributed.

    [​IMG]

    The design of the Mash & Boil has both upsides and downsides. For the ease of lifting the mash pipe out to distribute the temp evenly at dough in and also for lifting to drain after the mash is to have the M&B on the ground. This also puts the control panel on the ground meaning you have to lay on the floor every time you go to change the settings, and it might mean you need an extension cord to reach an outlet This position also removes gravity feeding post chill.

    For ease of access to the control panel and for gravity feeding after chill, the best position for the M&B is on a counter top. This makes doughing in, mixing, and removing the grain pipe for sparging much more painful on the back and upper chest. Setting the M&B on a stable chair or sturdy milk crate would be a good solution. It allows for ease of lift on the body as well as ease of control panel access, if you get it right you should be able to open the valve straight into a bucket or carboy as well.

    [​IMG]

    One issue with the design that can't be fixed with raising the machine slightly to a level between floor and counter top is the placement of the volume markings in the kettle and the lack of markings in the pipe. When you are sparging for the preboil volume you are unable to see the volume markings inside the kettle as the mash pipe is in the way. There are also no volume markings inside the mash pipe which means you can't add sparge water directly to the unit without premeasuring it. I found it simple to just stand at the unit with the pipe in sparge position while I had a low pressure spray from the handheld faucet at the kitchen sink (picture above). It got my 89% eff, but I was still guessing on how much liquid to add. A few volume markings inside the pipe would make it easier to gauge the sparge water added without direct measurements.


    [​IMG]

    The only poopoo on the design that I feel is a failure on Brewer's Edge and not just a personal issue... no alarms... it would have been simple enough for them to add a temperature reached alarm. This would have significantly added to the ease of use of this unit. I could add the water, set the temp, walk away and forget about it until it beeped at me, and then sparged and walked away until it beeped at me to say it was boiling. I can always add this myself with a digital chef's alarm, but it takes away from the one vessel for everything aspect of the M&B.

    [​IMG]

    My process was as follows:
    Turn on the unit and fill to the desired strike volume. Set the temp to the desired mash temp for 1:20 minutes, no delay (I will use the delay later this week for batch 3 after work). I chose 1:20 not for actual mash time, but to allow for stirring the mash, achieving the rest temp, etc, then 1 hour of mash - I time my mash from a separate timer and not the unit. Weigh and crush the grains, measure the brewing salts while temp ramps up. Dump half the grains into the pipe and mix, then the rest - I would never do it this way in any of my other vessels, but it actually worked great in the M&B. Continue to stir the grains, breaking up any dough balls, lifting the basket, lowering the basket, stir bottom to top and back again, lift, lower, stir, lift, lower, stir. The temp should be where you wanted it at this point, both read from the M&B probe and a secondary thermometer from the top. Let the mash rest for one hour, stirring 3 times, at 15, 30, 45.

    Once the hour is up, set the control panel to 218 for 1 hour, no delay, both heating elements on. Raise the basket to sparge level, and sparge with warm water straight from the handheld spray faucet. Allow to drain until 6.75 gallons is achieved, remove the grain pipe, place lid on and allow to come to boil. Once boiling, remove lid, add foam control and bittering hops. Set a timer for 60 minutes with hop timers set as well (I use Brew Timer on Android). Once the boil is over, turn off the control panel settings but not the unit. This continues to give you a temperature reading as you chill the wort. I had 1/2 gallon of boil off which gave me 6.25 gallons post boil, and yielded exactly 5.75 gallons into my 6 gallon fermenter.

    I put my IC chiller into the vessel, turn on the cold water and drain it back to the sink. I add my WP hops, give it a big stir with a SS slotted spoon to get a whirlpool going and break up the pellets, and let her ride until desired pitch temp is reached, stirring every so often to ensure a proper temp reading. Sanitize my tubing, open the valve, drain into sanitized fermenter, pitch my yeast, set my fermentation control, pour a beer. I dump my spent grains, wash the pipe and kettle out in the sink, then clean up any other items.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
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  31. thetomG

    thetomG Devotee (463) Feb 17, 2010 Illinois

    As a fellow Mash & Boil owner, this is a great write-up. I've done about 20 batches so far on my system but still picked up a few interesting tips/techniques to try on my next batch, so thanks!

    Regarding placement of the unit, I recommend this cart - keeps it off the ground (but not TOO high to make sparging difficult), control panel more accessible, plus room for pump & chiller on bottom shelf...

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001MS6WMO/ref=oh_aui_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1
     
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  32. Goebel

    Goebel Initiate (0) Feb 1, 2019

    I'm a newbie to this art / hobby.
    I had been thinking about getting in for a while but when my son gave me a gift certificate for our local supplier I ran down and bought the mash and boil. I wanted electric. Hey, I live in Wisconsin! Indoor brewing is a must. I've brewed three kits now and two all grain recipes. I'm still learning the basics but I find this machine acceptable.
    My latest batch was my first try at a stout and I bought a pump for recirculation. The pump emptied the kettle, I scorched it, and then the dreaded E4 error code kicked my butt. I had no experience with this but found it on the internet. I bypassed the thermal cutout and continued with my brew day/ evening. Prior to this event I had no trouble. The pump is going to need some tuning to reduce flow rate. I am looking forward to learning more.
     
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  33. neelonjm

    neelonjm Initiate (47) Jul 13, 2015 Ohio

    Does anyone know if this would work with 3 gallon batches? I know the Grainfather has a minimum of 8 lbs of grain, and I've read some thing about smaller batches being a little tougher in that. But I'm hoping because this doesn't have a pump, it won't be as big of a deal. I tend not to drink all that much these days, so 5 gallons is a lot for me. I've been making 3 gallon batches more recently, and it's been working well for me.
     
  34. Maestro0708

    Maestro0708 Initiate (0) Feb 27, 2015 Kentucky

    Yes, the manufacturer says you can do as little as 2 1/2 gallons. I havent read anything about a grain "minimum".

    Cheers
     
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  35. GreenKrusty101

    GreenKrusty101 Initiate (0) Dec 4, 2008 Nevada

    After spending the last week looking at houses in an area with no natural gas, I'm beginning to pay more attention to electric systems (one house I looked at did have a 220 V golf cart charger outlet in the garage) :slight_smile:
     
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  36. neelonjm

    neelonjm Initiate (47) Jul 13, 2015 Ohio

    Awesome, thank you! Have you added an aftermarket pump to yours for re-circulation during the mash, or do you just stir it a few times during the mash?
     
  37. Maestro0708

    Maestro0708 Initiate (0) Feb 27, 2015 Kentucky


    I have not added a pump. I stir the mash periodically and 'recirculate' by taking wort from the bottom valve and pouring it over the top of the mash.

    Cheers
     
  38. Maestro0708

    Maestro0708 Initiate (0) Feb 27, 2015 Kentucky

    Has anyone else experienced scorching at the bottom of this unit? Its been happening consistently for me now, especially if I boil for longer than 60 minutes. Any ideas on how to prevent this?

    Thanks
     
  39. jbakajust1

    jbakajust1 Crusader (769) Aug 25, 2009 Oregon

    I have, I get the error code and it kicks off near 45 minutes into a 60 minute boil. What I have started doing is stir up the wort and scrape the bottom good with my mash paddle while it is heating to a boil, run the wort through my pump and back in through a fine mesh SS hop spider (too fine to actually use for hops honestly). It gets all of the grain and malt flour that made it through the mash tube out of solution and off the bottom. I also run it through the sieve once I get hot break to get some of the egg drop soup protein out and off the bottom.
     
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  40. riptorn

    riptorn Zealot (518) Apr 26, 2018 North Carolina
    Society Trader

    Remembered this thread after receiving a Williams Brewing promo email.

    For those considering the Brewer's Edge Mash & Boil with Pump, Williams is offering a free Brewer's Edge Sparge Water Heater with the M&B purchase. The sparge heater normally retails for ~$160 on their site. Offer expires midnight tomorrow night (2019-05-16).

    PSA only; I have no vested interest in Brewer's Edge of Williams Brewing.
     
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