Bumping up final gravity

Discussion in 'Homebrewing' started by Smokebox_79, May 8, 2013.

  1. Smokebox_79

    Smokebox_79 Jan 11, 2013 Pennsylvania

    Wondering what tricks people use to get a higher final gravity. Using Beersmith and want slightly higher FG on Porters and Stouts. Getting around 1.011-1.1014, looking for closer to 1.017 or higher. Any help is appreciated.
     
  2. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania

    I can’t provide an answer in the context of Beersmith but two strategies that I utilize to obtain a beer with a higher final gravity is:

    · Yeast selection: use a yeast which is not highly attenuating. For example, Danstar Windsor yeast is not a highly attenuating yeast.
    · Utilize specialty/roasted/crystal malts for a significant portion of the grain bill. These grains will add dextrins which will add body.

    Cheers!
     
    Smokebox_79 likes this.
  3. mikehartigan

    mikehartigan Apr 9, 2007 Illinois

    Mash at a higher temperature for a less fermentable wort.
     
    Drucifer likes this.
  4. VikeMan

    VikeMan Jul 12, 2009 Pennsylvania
    Beer Trader

    Jack's and Mike's recommendations are both good from an 'all other things being equal' point of view. It would also help if you posted your recipe and process. Then someone possibly could give you an answer more directly applicable to your situation.
     
  5. reverseapachemaster

    reverseapachemaster Sep 21, 2012 Texas

    Are you looking for more sweetness or more body or both? Different approaches for different goals.
     
  6. Smokebox_79

    Smokebox_79 Jan 11, 2013 Pennsylvania

    Mostly do extract and partial mashes, cant afford equipment for all grain. I have 3 designed recipes, a vanilla porter, chocolate milk stout, and a chocolate chili american stout. all the FG are projected to be 1.011-1.014. Trying to bump up body and mouthfeel for the most part.
     
  7. AlCaponeJunior

    AlCaponeJunior May 21, 2010 Texas

    has your mouthfeel and body been lacking thusfar? I found with extract and partial mashes I never had any problems. I assumed the crystal malts they use in the extract give plenty of body. Actually, I haven't with all grain either.
     
    Smokebox_79 likes this.
  8. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania

    Permit me to recommend Danstar Windsor yeast for those three beers if you are looking for beers with body.

    One month ago I brewed a partial mash Oatmeal Stout with Danstar Windsor; roughly 50% of the fermentables from grains and 50% of the fermentables from malt extract. I mashed at 153°F for one hour:

    · 4 lbs. of Marris Otter
    · 1 lb. of Flaked Oatmeal
    · ½ lb. English Chocolate Malt
    · ¼ lb. English Black Malt

    I used 3.25 lbs. of DME.

    I obtained an Apparent Attenuation of 73% which I chiefly attribute to the Windsor Yeast since it is a moderate attenuator.

    My Oatmeal Stout has plenty of body due to the Oatmeal and higher final gravity.

    Cheers!

    Edit: From the Danstar website: "Beers created with Windsor are usually described as full-bodied, fruity English ales."
     
    Smokebox_79 likes this.
  9. AlCaponeJunior

    AlCaponeJunior May 21, 2010 Texas

    I've used Windsor before and it left plenty of body.
     
  10. VikeMan

    VikeMan Jul 12, 2009 Pennsylvania
    Beer Trader

    So... recipe?

    Edit: Wait....are you saying you haven't brewed these yet, and that Beersmith is predicting those OGs? In that case... recipe?
     
  11. AlCaponeJunior

    AlCaponeJunior May 21, 2010 Texas

    Beersmith predicting 1.010 FG doesn't mean the beer won't have plenty of body and mouthfeel. So be sure why you're trying to bump the FG before you take action.
     
  12. Smokebox_79

    Smokebox_79 Jan 11, 2013 Pennsylvania

    Not lacking, but I have done mostly IPAs, an ESB (Which I freaking love), and a Belgian Orange Wit. Just wanted to try to end up with a slightly higher gravity, just to say I did it I guess. Fairly new to homebrewing and havent really had a bad batch. The Belgian Orange Wit needs to age for a while yet. Wanna get rid of that bubblegum flavor I got from strained Munich yeast. Pretty much have gotten what i wanted thusfar. More or less I look for that "drinks like a meal" feel in Porters and Stouts. Also did a Brewers Best Smoked Porter for my first batch. Came out at 1.020 and I loved it! wanna get that kind of mouthfeel and body.
     
  13. Smokebox_79

    Smokebox_79 Jan 11, 2013 Pennsylvania

    This is a partial mash recipe I designed for a Chocolate Milk Stout. As I said before Im newish to homebrewing (though my friend and I have done countless hours of research). FG is estimated at 1.011, wanted maybe 1.015-1.020.

    8 oz. Aromatic malt
    8 oz. Black Malt
    8 oz. Cara-Pils
    8 oz. Chocolate Malt

    3.3 lbs Golden LME
    3.3 lbs Treacle
    8 oz. Light Brown Sugar (20 min)
    1 lbs Lactose

    1 oz. Columbia (60)
    1 oz. Fuggles (20)

    3 oz. Cacoa Nibs (Secondary for 7 days)
     
  14. AlCaponeJunior

    AlCaponeJunior May 21, 2010 Texas

    All that sugar won't help at all in getting a thick mouthfeel and higher FG. If anything, all that sugar will lower your FG and dry out your beer. The brown sugar and treacle won't help you reach your goal, replace them with DME. The lactose is fine.
     
    gdkersey likes this.
  15. Smokebox_79

    Smokebox_79 Jan 11, 2013 Pennsylvania

    What kind of DME would you suggest? Tried to make it somewhat affordable for a middle class working guy! Haha!
     
  16. VikeMan

    VikeMan Jul 12, 2009 Pennsylvania
    Beer Trader

    Treacle and Brown Sugar are not going to do anything to build FG. Lactose will. The thing to think about is that most brewing software doesn't distinguish between the relative fermentabilities of various ingredients. In reality, the sugar in the brown sugar (for example) will all ferment, leaving no FG contribution. The lactose will not ferment at all, leaving a big FG contribution. Yeast strain, which you didn't list, is also a big factor in the fermentability of grain-derived sugars.

    I would recommend starting with something like Jamil's Milk Stout recipe and seeing how you like the results. (Actual results, not what Brewsmith or whatever is estimating.) Bottom Line...software FG estimates are about worthless when using unusual ingredients or large amounts of specialty grains.
     
  17. Smokebox_79

    Smokebox_79 Jan 11, 2013 Pennsylvania

    Safale S-04, sorry! :cP
     
  18. AlCaponeJunior

    AlCaponeJunior May 21, 2010 Texas

    Generally I would suggest plain light DME. Most people will agree. Add specialty grains to light DME in order to achieve your final goals.

    I don't think it's terrible to use amber or dark extracts, and you can make fine beers with them, but you don't know exactly what's in them, so it makes it harder to formulate your recipe with any degree of accuracy. Thus, the "use light" advice.

    And yeast was mentioned: S-04 is probably just fine, but you might try Windsor dry yeast too, as it doesn't attenuate as much and will leave you with a slightly higher FG. I've used it and I thought it made fine beer.
     
  19. Smokebox_79

    Smokebox_79 Jan 11, 2013 Pennsylvania

    Not sure if my local HBS has that, but I will definitely try it! Thanks Al and Vike for all the advice!
     
  20. Smokebox_79

    Smokebox_79 Jan 11, 2013 Pennsylvania

    Also, is it better for a late DME addition or at hot break? I know about hop utilization, but since these are malt forward beers would it matter?
     
  21. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania

    There is no need for a late DME addtion for these beers.

    Cheers!
     
  22. Smokebox_79

    Smokebox_79 Jan 11, 2013 Pennsylvania

    Thats what I thought but I wasnt sure. Better to ask seasoned homebrewers! Thanks Jack!
     
  23. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania

    Good luck wth your beers!

    Cheers!
     
  24. Smokebox_79

    Smokebox_79 Jan 11, 2013 Pennsylvania

    Currently drinking an AIIPA I brewed an its awesome! Hope my darker fuller bodied beers turn as good as my lighter ones! Thanks!
     
  25. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania

    I just want to double check that by partial mash you will be:

    · Mashing at a water to grain ratio something like 1.5 quarts per lb. of grains. So for your recipe you posted you will use something like 3 quarts of water.
    · You will mash for a duration of 1 hour.
    · You will maintain a mash temperature in the 150’s for the 1 hour duration (at a set temperature),

    The reason I am asking this is because aromatic malt needs to be mashed.

    Cheers!
     
  26. Smokebox_79

    Smokebox_79 Jan 11, 2013 Pennsylvania

    2.5 qrts for 75 min. trying to keep as close to 150 as possible on an electric stove with no mash equipment other than a small pot and a grain bag.
     
  27. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania

    An easy way to maintain mash temperature when mashing in a small pot is to place the pot in an oven set to 150°F. Once the mash is established at the set temperature it will maintain that temperature for as long as you want in the oven’s ambient temperature of 150°F.

    Cheers!
     
    boddhitree likes this.
  28. Smokebox_79

    Smokebox_79 Jan 11, 2013 Pennsylvania

    Thats a great idea!! I never thought of that!!
     
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