Craft Beer Calorie Count (hazy ipa and pastry stout)

Discussion in 'Beer Talk' started by mumbles44, Mar 6, 2018.

  1. mumbles44

    mumbles44 Aspirant (200) Jan 22, 2016 New Jersey
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    Was having a conversation and calorie count came up..

    In particular all of the Lactose/ Oat hazy IPA that are being produced ( looking at you OH & Magnify).

    Also we brought up some of the pastry/adjunt heavy stouts being made.

    anyone have an idea of what some of these look like or how to figure out? Did some research but didnt come across much..

    no real reason why but this is purely curiosity on my part now.

    I have seen an 8oz pour of Black Tuesday is equilivent to a large McDonalds Fry (500 calories)
     
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  2. Brew4Brew

    Brew4Brew Initiate (0) Aug 17, 2008 New Jersey

    Not sure how accurate they are, but I was using my fitness pal last year and it had a bunch of beers with calorie counts. Carton boat was 145, used that as my go to beer since it wasn't a killer on calories
     
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  3. Sage954

    Sage954 Initiate (39) Jul 8, 2016 Maryland
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    The new Sam Adamms NEIPA is 212 calories. I would think as ABV increases, so do the calories.
     
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  4. rozzom

    rozzom Champion (836) Jan 22, 2011 New York
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    Need @dhaakon here for this since he’s the numbers guy

    Just using 16oz to be consistent (and since 16oz cans is the only way to sell haze these days) At a total guess I would say:

    16oz hazy oat lactose 8% ABV DIPA = 350-450 calories

    16oz additive-laden 12% ABV imperial “pastry” stout = 600-700 calories

    Edit - this could probably go in the Beer Talk forum no?
     
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  5. mumbles44

    mumbles44 Aspirant (200) Jan 22, 2016 New Jersey
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    good numbers, and could go in beer talk..but i was thinking more the lines of OH lately.

    just cirrus how it all works out number wise
     
  6. StoutSnob40

    StoutSnob40 Poo-Bah (2,394) Jan 4, 2013 California
    Society Trader

    Sort of an old thread, but I am curious about something..

    Do the additives in pastry stouts add calories?

    Example:
    11% imperial stout - No additives. Just a basic stout, like a Ten-Fidy or something.
    11% pastry stout - Maple syrup, marshmallows, chocolate, etc.

    Are the calories still dictated by the ABV, or do calories/sugars in the pastry stout additives survive the fermentation process and add calories?
     
  7. bbtkd

    bbtkd Poo-Bah (2,555) Sep 20, 2015 South Dakota
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    Absolutely, particularly the sugar. Avery Rumpkin is a prime example. I don't know the calorie rating on that but it must be off the scale. It tastes like they filled a bottle with sugar than added as much beer as the sugar could absorb. It's several notches past cloying. That has to be real high calorie. I love Avery BA beers generally, but not that one.
     
  8. StoutSnob40

    StoutSnob40 Poo-Bah (2,394) Jan 4, 2013 California
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    I would agree with you, but like, do you have clear proof? Not being a dick, but I’d be interested to hear from brewers to see if they’ve ever tested it.
     
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  9. DEdesings57

    DEdesings57 Zealot (517) Aug 26, 2012 New Jersey
    Trader

    HA! Let me take my final swig of Magnify beer first, okay I'm done now(literately too!). So I have thought about this before as well. But Im sure it would depress the hell out of me if I knew the actual numbers to these styles of beers. They gotta be really high and I am sure the breweries that produce theses kinds of beers know that. But it wouldn't make for good advertisement!
     
  10. bbtkd

    bbtkd Poo-Bah (2,555) Sep 20, 2015 South Dakota
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    Proof on internet forums? Do I look like @jesskidden ??????

    I did find that Rumpkin has 440 calories, but not sure what to compare it to. Perhaps a similar ABV beer?
     
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  11. njcraftfan

    njcraftfan Initiate (96) Dec 18, 2016 New Jersey

    Wouldn't this depend on if it's only "conditioned" raher than brewed with on those adjuncts, where the sugar or other calorie additive adjuncts are not fermented out? I would think so....but not sure how much of those additives actually end up in the packaged beer

    Let's not forget Lactose... have to figure a heavily lactose double or triple has to have even more calorires that the same beer without.
     
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  12. spersichilli

    spersichilli Initiate (87) Apr 26, 2018 Florida
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    Not necessarily the additions, but the base beer has a lot more residual sugars left from fermentation than a more traditional imperial stout. Lactose does not ferment out so that would add calories
     
  13. lucius10

    lucius10 Devotee (457) Aug 1, 2017 California

    As a hazebro (LOL!) that drinks around 32 ozs.(two tall cans) of mostly hazy/lactose/oat/fruited/milkshake/juicy/soft-on-the-palate/high ABV/sour/unfiltered/DDH'd (did I miss one?! Haha!) DIPAs and TIPAs, I am assuming that I am drinking 800 to 1000 extra calories a night!
     
  14. Yellowlt4

    Yellowlt4 Initiate (52) Sep 21, 2016 Texas

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  15. readyski

    readyski Aspirant (247) Jun 4, 2005 California
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    I am of the impression that the ABV will determine the calories, the additives not so much.
     
  16. LarryV

    LarryV Meyvn (1,353) Jun 13, 2001 Massachusetts
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  17. AZBeerDude72

    AZBeerDude72 Poo-Bah (1,745) Jun 10, 2016 Arizona
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    I have read that they could be like 500-700 calories. I was shocked when I saw that, no wonder they pack on the LBS.

    Maybe I want a calorie count next to the canned on date LOL
     
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  18. donspublic

    donspublic Poo-Bah (1,764) Aug 4, 2014 Texas
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    Not really, as someone pointed out above, there are some yeast & mash profiles that will leave a high amount of unfermentable sugars laying around in the beer for sweetness along with mouthfeel.
     
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  19. readyski

    readyski Aspirant (247) Jun 4, 2005 California
    Trader

    I'm wondering how much difference that can make (not saying zero). So if you start with a 12%er and add shitloads of chocolate, vanilla and maple, how much would that add to the 480 cals @16oz? More than 100 (20%) and still drinkable?
     
  20. donspublic

    donspublic Poo-Bah (1,764) Aug 4, 2014 Texas
    Society Trader

    Well that depends, chocolate and maple are the ones bringing the calories above and if they are added and allowed to ferment, they will bring little to the party in way of increased "hidden" calories. The Maple syrup will ferment out most of its sugars. What I was referring to above was more along the lines of recipe design. If you mash your beer to a less than fermentable wort, and you use a a yeast that has low attenuation, you will produce a beer with a lower ABV than one that was mashed to produce a higher fermentable wort and a high attenuation yeast. So the first beer above has hidden calories that are not showing up in that ABV calculation. You would normally think he beer is sweeter, and sometimes they are. But this can be hidden by increasing the bitterness. So unless the brewery is giving you the calories, we can only presume to calculate them using some sort of chart.
    Here is a sample chart that will work for most normal beers
    https://draftmag.com/your-fancy-beer-is-more-caloric-than-you-think/
    So applying this to known examples (2.5 X Abv) x ounces
    Lagunitas Day Time
    (2.5 x 4) x 12 = 120 where Daytime is actually 98 (dry beer,high ferm wort, high attun yeast)
    Sierra Nevada Pale Ale
    (2.5 x 5.6) x 12 = 168 SN site: 175 (somewhat normal beer with regards to ferm & yeast)
    Sierra Nevada BigFoot
    (2.5 x 9.6) x 12 = 288 SN site: 318 (sweeter beer)
    Sierra Nevada Brut IPA
    (2.5 x 6.2) x 12 = 186 SN site: 156 (dry beer, high fer wort, high attun yeast)

    So not sure if this answered your question, but just wanted to show that a standard calculation won't work across a range of beers. But normally a dry beer means that there are less residual sugars that didn't get fermented out
     
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