Do all aluminum beverage cans have a plastic lining?

Discussion in 'Beer Talk' started by BLA1R, Jul 16, 2019.

  1. BLA1R

    BLA1R Initiate (54) Sep 1, 2015 Illinois

    Do only some have the plastic lining? Or is it all cans?

    I don't care about plastic, I'm asking solely out of curiosity. Thanks in advance
     
  2. MNAle

    MNAle Poo-Bah (1,511) Sep 6, 2011 Minnesota
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    Some of the food canning companies (like, for example, Campbell's Soups) have switched to non-BPA linings, but finding a suitable replacement is difficult, especially for highly acidic foods.

    I don't think any of the beer can suppliers have found any substitute.

    Either way, they are all still plastic, I believe.
     
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  3. stevepat

    stevepat Defender (688) Mar 12, 2013 California
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    Yes all have some kind of lining
     
  4. bbtkd

    bbtkd Poo-Bah (2,551) Sep 20, 2015 South Dakota
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    All of mine are lined with beer, wall to wall :wink:
     
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  5. SFACRKnight

    SFACRKnight Meyvn (1,330) Jan 20, 2012 Colorado
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    Those big cans don't.
     
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  6. bbtkd

    bbtkd Poo-Bah (2,551) Sep 20, 2015 South Dakota
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    Crowlers don't?
     
  7. LeRose

    LeRose Meyvn (1,386) Nov 24, 2011 Massachusetts
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  8. MNAle

    MNAle Poo-Bah (1,511) Sep 6, 2011 Minnesota
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    Same thing.

    Human Health & Safety >> Product Safety

    Epoxy Resin Can Coatings and Bisphenol A Safety Information
     
  9. LeRose

    LeRose Meyvn (1,386) Nov 24, 2011 Massachusetts
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  10. jesskidden

    jesskidden Poo-Bah (1,822) Aug 10, 2005 New Jersey
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    No, he said "big cans"...
    ... which I suppose (could be wrong...@SFACRKnight ?) was meant as a joke and referring to the even bigger 5.16, 7.75 & 15.5 gallon-sized, stainless ones.
    [​IMG]
    The now-obsolete (? - in the US, anyway) aluminum beer kegs were often lined, as well - but with pitch, just as the straight steel and wooden kegs were.
     
  11. stevepat

    stevepat Defender (688) Mar 12, 2013 California
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    Of course you've got the increase of these single use plastic kegs with some kind of synthetic bladder in them
    [​IMG]
     
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  12. marquis

    marquis Crusader (771) Nov 20, 2005 United Kingdom (England)

    Interestingly, wooden casks were not pitch lined in the UK. It was never considered to be necessary and from my personal experience it wasn't. I've had some amazing pints from the wood.
     
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  13. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (4,093) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
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    And that is due to the difference of Northern European oak used to produce wooden casks in the UK vs. American oak used to produce wooden barrels in the US. American oak imparts flavor to the liquid within the barrel - think about Moonshine going into American Oak wooden barrels and the whiskey (e.g., Bourbon) that results from the aging in the unpitched wooden barrels. One of the flavors imparted by the American oak is vanilla.

    Cheers!
     
  14. jesskidden

    jesskidden Poo-Bah (1,822) Aug 10, 2005 New Jersey
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    US lager brewers in the 19th century no doubt learned the technique from German brewers (and, of course, in many cases the Americans were German-trained brewers), based on the quotes in the first half of my PITCH page.
     
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  15. hopfenunmaltz

    hopfenunmaltz Meyvn (1,451) Jun 8, 2005 Michigan

    I have seen many wooden kegs lined with pitch in Bavaria.
     
  16. SFACRKnight

    SFACRKnight Meyvn (1,330) Jan 20, 2012 Colorado
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    At least someone got it
     
  17. Oh_Dark_Star

    Oh_Dark_Star Meyvn (1,028) Mar 4, 2015 Washington
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    All coated that I've found. I remember reading somewhere (possibly when I purchased a SIGG extruded aluminum water bottle) that aluminum consumption was at one time linked to alzheimer's. Though I think that claim is more controversial now.

    Then when BPA started getting banned or restricted there were talks that the plastic alternatives were likely more hazardous!

    If heavy metals don't get ya somehow, the plastics will.
     
  18. beertunes

    beertunes Poo-Bah (6,084) Sep 24, 2007 Northern Mariana Islands
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    That's what she said!
     
  19. Zorro

    Zorro Poo-Bah (4,439) Dec 25, 2003 California

    It is Red Oak VS White Oak.

    White oak is what you want for flavor and barrels.

    Red oak doesn't do much and it is much more porous so you needed the pitch lining to keep the fluids in.

    Red oak is best used for furniture and making excellent BBQ.
     
  20. jesskidden

    jesskidden Poo-Bah (1,822) Aug 10, 2005 New Jersey
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    American beer kegs (the trade packages - unlikely even the smallest US breweries after Repeal would age beer in quantities as small a barrel) were made of white oak and were routinely pitched "...to prevent beer from contacting the wood or metal and to facilitate cleaning. In wood packages it serves to prevent absorption of beer into the pores of the wood. It also prevents the imparting of any "woody" of foreign flavor to the beer."
    [The Practical Brewer, 1946]

    Major US cooperage houses supplying the brewing industry like Rochester Cooperage, St. Louis Cooperage, Verdi Bros and A. Hammer all advertised they still used only white oak in the years after Repeal. By that period, the mills supplying white oak were all in the southern states.
    [​IMG]
    According to tests by the US Forest Service in the 1930s, red oak's porousness for liquid was not the problem, it was their inability to contain the CO2, even when pitched under normal methods ("gas leakage being 60 times that of liquid"). A process of pressure-treating with hot liquid pitch was developed.

    See my page on the topic for more info on Pitch.
     
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  21. SFACRKnight

    SFACRKnight Meyvn (1,330) Jan 20, 2012 Colorado
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    I didnt know you got a job with Melvin! :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:
     
  22. nc41

    nc41 Poo-Bah (1,863) Sep 25, 2008 North Carolina
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    And bourbon requires new white oak barrels that are charred to impart not only flavor but color. Flavor depends on the amount of char and age. Vanilla, caramel, tobacco, leather, etc.

    Certainly wouldn’t do with beer.
     
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  23. stevepat

    stevepat Defender (688) Mar 12, 2013 California
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    Ya, what sort of nutjob would put perfectly good beer into a charred white oak barrel? The only thing crazier would be if that barrel was already soaked with liquor :wink:
     
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  24. beertunes

    beertunes Poo-Bah (6,084) Sep 24, 2007 Northern Mariana Islands
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    Melvin sold their outpost in my town.
     
  25. nc41

    nc41 Poo-Bah (1,863) Sep 25, 2008 North Carolina
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    You
    Could be some type of smoked beer I suppose, but without being wet first who knows, the heavy char might not work. Stone used oak in one of their Arrogant Bastards I think, but the wood was very prominent, White Oak Jai Alai too, and I think they made one out of cedar too but that beer really sucked. But that was many years ago too, and I think they used staves instead of barrels, without being wet it might be prohibitive. Surprised at the number of bourbon barrels being imported to Scotland to be used for barreling, as well as cherry and port barrels. I really dig the port barrels.
     
    #25 nc41, Jul 21, 2019
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2019
  26. SFACRKnight

    SFACRKnight Meyvn (1,330) Jan 20, 2012 Colorado
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    For real? Seems like their time has come and gone.
     
  27. stevepat

    stevepat Defender (688) Mar 12, 2013 California
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    Haha I was just making a joke about bourbon barrel stouts. But there have certainly been a number of wood treated beers. I've even encountered one brewery (goodwood in Louisville) that puts all of their beers through some kind of wood. Although my experience of their beers would tend to support your position
     
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  28. beertunes

    beertunes Poo-Bah (6,084) Sep 24, 2007 Northern Mariana Islands
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    I started a thread in the NW forum, more details there.
     
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  29. nc41

    nc41 Poo-Bah (1,863) Sep 25, 2008 North Carolina
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    Lol, I saw the humor, but it got me thinking about the difference between wet barrels and newly charred oak. What it does to whiskey is amazing, I’d guess what it might do to beer maybe not so good. Using staves for a however long it sits is certainly different than new full barrels would be, and can definitely see the magic that sometimes happens using wet barrels of bourbon/rum, never had tequila.
     
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  30. nc41

    nc41 Poo-Bah (1,863) Sep 25, 2008 North Carolina
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    Budweiser is beechwood aged, :slight_smile:
     
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  31. stevepat

    stevepat Defender (688) Mar 12, 2013 California
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    you're position grows stronger by the minute
     
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  32. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (4,093) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
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    Dale, you likely know this already but:

    The beechwood strips are sanitized such that they are totally devoid of flavor. The beechwood strips are utilized in the lagering tanks to provide a 'resting place' for the AB yeast and fosters the production of the lager beer.

    Below is a video which provides further details; the part on lagering on beechwood chips starts at the around the 13:00 mark.



    Cheers!
     
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  33. nc41

    nc41 Poo-Bah (1,863) Sep 25, 2008 North Carolina
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    There no influence that I could ever see, but they put it on the label.