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Do you pour the yeast into a witbier the way you do a hefeweizen?

Discussion in 'Beer Talk' started by Greywulfken, Dec 29, 2012.

  1. Greywulfken

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    I'm about to have an Allagash White in a nonic pint glass, and I can see the dark layer of yeast on the bottom. With a hefeweizen, I stir up the yeast and include it in my pour. Should I do the same with a witbier?

    Thanks.
     
  2. yemenmocha

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    If it's the very thin white haze, yes. I'm fairly sure that's the norm.

    If it's solidified into chunks then I don't. I don't like dancing chunks in my beer.
     
  3. Thickfreakness

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    Some of it... I eye the pour and just let in enough to make me happy. I like a little filth now and again, but normaly, I try to find a nice medium.
     
  4. Greywulfken

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    Well, I had to have it well before any response (poor impulse control and all), so I just poured it in normal style - some yeast went in with the last drops but I left it as that - didn't do the thing where you swirl some beer in the bottom of the bottle to get it all into the glass.
    Didn't get much of a head despite a fairly confident pour...
    [​IMG]
    You can see some of the yeast haze from the pour:
    [​IMG]
    If I get it again, I'll give it the full yeast treatment, just for comparison purposes.

    Nice beer, BTW.
     
    franklinn and BobZ like this.
  5. antilite

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    I always do the swirl and pour, but into my Stone taster glass, and then have a sip. Then, I have three options: Finish the tasters glass. Pour it into the beer. Pour it into the drain. Since I like the taste of many yeast varieties, I enjoy tossing down the taster contents.
     
  6. kell50

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    When pouring a hefeweizen you're strongly encouraged to swirl the yeast into your glass. However, with a Belgian wit ale your not supposed to add the yeast. The reason being is that because your drinking a "white ale" if you add the yeast the beer no longer has the true appearance of how its intended to look.

    All of this being said.. I usually pour in the yeast when drinking wit ales. :)
     
  7. UCLABrewN84

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    Pour it all.
     
    kojevergas likes this.
  8. Relik

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    personal taste triumphs again. Myself a Wit/Hefe needs to be cloudy so i pour a nice portion ( depending on how fresh the beer is)
     
  9. jhartley

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    I always follow the swirl and pour method.
     
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