Do you you repeat the the same mistake, over and over and...

Discussion in 'Homebrewing' started by b-one, May 7, 2013.

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  1. b-one

    b-one Initiate (0) Feb 6, 2013 California

    Naw, you all have got every step locked in right?
    Me, I always seem to forget that I should shut the damn valve after draining the pre-heating tun water. Mash tun is sitting in the sink and the valve is turned to the back side is my only weak-sauce excuse. Probably drained several quarts of strike last Saturday before the brain woke up. Did hit the OG, though, so maybe I'll just continue doing it and call it 'pre-rinse'.
    Or maybe I'll work on being a bit more awake before I start.

    Anyone else want to trot out their regular brewing brain farts?
     
  2. MADhombrewer

    MADhombrewer Initiate (0) Jun 4, 2008 Oregon

    I have written down the steps so, hopefully, I don't forget one. If I am brewing with someone, though, I forget everything since we are mostly talking/drinking. #shinyobjectsyndrome
     
    Bubbalito likes this.
  3. Tebuken

    Tebuken Disciple (326) Jun 6, 2009 Argentina

    Yes, I stupidly repeat the same f*king thing, forget purging kegs before force carbonating!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
     
  4. MrOH

    MrOH Defender (642) Jul 5, 2010 Maryland

    Not recording when I add dry-hops.
     
  5. GeckoPunk

    GeckoPunk Initiate (163) Jul 29, 2012 Connecticut

    Leaving the spigot open on my 6.5 primary bucket when pouring wort into it... :slight_frown: Usually left open after draining out some StarSan to sanitize the spigot.
     
    Tebuken, PortLargo and GreenKrusty101 like this.
  6. barfdiggs

    barfdiggs Initiate (0) Mar 22, 2011 California

    Not mashing high enough since getting my Thermapen. My beers just keep coming out too dry.
     
  7. jncastillo87

    jncastillo87 Initiate (0) Jan 27, 2013 Texas

    Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results. :wink:
     
  8. mikehartigan

    mikehartigan Aspirant (295) Apr 9, 2007 Illinois

    1. Leaving the spigot on the boil kettle open when collecting the runoff.
    2. Forgetting to purge the headspace in the keg.
    3. Leaving the faucet open when I tap a keg.
     
    GeckoPunk, jlordi12 and Tebuken like this.
  9. epk

    epk Initiate (145) Jun 10, 2008 New Jersey

    I guess I still forget Irish Moss from time to time.

    Hahaha... I've done it once or twice myself.
     
  10. AlCaponeJunior

    AlCaponeJunior Initiate (0) May 21, 2010 Texas

    Forgetting to bring a lighter and thus not being able to light the burner without borrowing one. Buying a wand type lighter and losing it before I use it once. :rolling_eyes:
     
  11. MLucky

    MLucky Aspirant (286) Jul 31, 2010 California

    I've forgotten to add whirlfoc a number of times. I'm always multitasking at that point in the boil, cleaning stuff, getting the chiller ready, etc, and whirlfloc gotten lost in the shuffle more than once.

    (Today's pro tip: it doesn't make that much difference in the finished beer.)
     
  12. jlordi12

    jlordi12 Devotee (405) Jun 8, 2011 Massachusetts
    Beer Trader

    #3 I've done several times, never a good time.
     
  13. unclejimbay

    unclejimbay Initiate (0) Aug 25, 2008 Florida

    Kicking my keg earlier than I was hoping...

    Happens almostevery time. "I wish it would have lasted just a week longer"
     
    flagmantho and NiceFly like this.
  14. pweis909

    pweis909 Poo-Bah (1,599) Aug 13, 2005 Wisconsin
    Supporter Subscriber

    I can't think of major mistakes I make repeatedly on brewdays. But small ones, like forgetting the Irish moss? Yeah, maybe 1 out of 4 times. Another one involves forgetting to put hops in a hop bags or just not having enough hop bags on hand. I built one of those hop spider things that might solve the problem, but guess what I keep forgetting to pull up from the basement on brew day? I guess I end up with more hop trub, some of which ends up getting transferred to beer, but which generally settles out in the fermenter anyhow, and is little problem, far as I can tell.

    I also keep forgetting to place orders for equipment items that are minor -- until you need them. When I order ingredients, I also like to put in for some replacement parts, like plastic tubing and keg seals and such. I been operating for a while without replacing some of my replaceables. Evenutally, some beer-ruining incident will help my memory, like an infection from old plastic siphon tubes (of course I sanitize!) or oxidation of entire batch due to a faulty seal.
     
  15. samtallica

    samtallica Initiate (0) Jul 22, 2010 North Carolina

    I really need to make a brewing checklist because I inevitably forget something somewhere throughout the process on every single batch. The beers still turn out pretty good though.
     
  16. Naugled

    Naugled Crusader (737) Sep 25, 2007 New York
    Subscriber

    Over and over again I forget to add the irish moss or whirlfloc
     
    jmich24 likes this.
  17. AlCaponeJunior

    AlCaponeJunior Initiate (0) May 21, 2010 Texas

    I've forgotten the Irish moss before, hasn't seemed to make a notable difference. I still intend to keep adding it tho.
     
  18. pointyskull

    pointyskull Disciple (310) Mar 17, 2010 Illinois
    Subscriber

    I never remember to order my ingredients far enough in advance to arrive in time for my "planned" brewday....
     
    inchrisin likes this.
  19. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (3,005) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
    Supporter

    A number of folks have made mention of forgetting to add kettle finings (e.g., Irish Moss, Whirlfloc) to their beers. I always add rehydrated Irish Moss to my boiling wort but it has always been my understanding that the most important thing to do is have a vigorous boil and a rapid chill to achieve a clearer beer. I figure that Irish Moss is just some cheap ‘insurance’ for clarifying my beers. Below is a nice write-up from a BYO article on this topic:

    “The most important practice in producing clear beer involves using heat and cold in just the right way to drop protein out of the wort. A good rule is to boil it as hard as you can, then chill it as quickly as you can.

    In the brewing kettle a good, rolling boil of about one hour will help the clarity of both all-grain and malt extract beers. A rolling boil makes the tannins and other compounds that form the hot-break material, or trub, collide with protein particles. A good rolling boil causes more protein and tannin removal than weak boils. After boiling there are still some proteins in solution. Much of the proteins form cold trub during chilling.

    Rapid and effective wort chilling, with a wort chiller, is a vital part of this process. When boiling wort is rapidly cooled, the trub forms large particles and drops to the bottom. This is called the cold break, and it drops a lot of protein out of solution. After chilling and a good cold break rest (for about two hours), the clear wort can be siphoned or poured into a primary fermenter, leaving cold trub and haze-forming compounds behind.”

    Cheers!
     
    AlCaponeJunior likes this.
  20. carteravebrew

    carteravebrew Zealot (503) Jan 21, 2010 Colorado

    Yeast nutrient and finings, no matter where we put it to remind us, never make it in during the boil...
     
  21. telejunkie

    telejunkie Disciple (320) Sep 14, 2007 Vermont

    yet another irish moss & yeast nutrients brain-farter. For some reason I got in a good routine with it, now I forget pretty much everytime. Haven't noticed too much of a difference luckily...

    That said I remember adding my tangential port in my kettle and thinking...I'm going to leave this open time & again on brew day and end up dumping wort everywhere. Been 2 years and haven't left it open once (yeah I know I just jinxed myself)
     
  22. JebediahScooter

    JebediahScooter Initiate (0) Sep 5, 2010 Vermont

    To prevent myself from forgetting whirfloc tablets, I've started bagging them with the late hop additions when I weigh out hops the night before.
     
    kjyost, MrOH, Tebuken and 3 others like this.
  23. CBlack85

    CBlack85 Crusader (703) Jul 12, 2009 South Carolina
    Beer Trader

    I have forgotten to add the whirlfloc several times, but lately for some reason I have neglected to make sure the valve on my mash tun is closed before I add the strike water... I have done that three of the last five times I've brewed. My wife has started calling those beers the "garage floor series"
     
    Beerontwowheels likes this.
  24. inchrisin

    inchrisin Defender (654) Sep 25, 2008 Indiana

    One word: Checklist :slight_smile:

    Put the things you forget the most often at the top, or as high as possible on your things to check.
     
  25. NiceFly

    NiceFly Aspirant (275) Dec 22, 2011 Tajikistan

    No time and time again mistakes, but if my timing gets thrown off things can get hectic.

    I am sure to the outside observer the procedure is as wacky as usual but in my own mind it is all going to hell until I think I have caught up to normal proceedings.
     
  26. Genuine

    Genuine Devotee (460) May 7, 2009 Connecticut

    Sometimes it's forgetting the whirlfloc near the end, and other times it can be cleaning the wort chiller after use. Other than that, i've been pretty good at remembering valves and things of that nature.
     
  27. GeckoPunk

    GeckoPunk Initiate (163) Jul 29, 2012 Connecticut

    Buying specialized yeast for one type of beer and using it for a different batch, leaving me with nothing for the recipe it was originally intended for... :flushed: For me, extra yeast never goes to waste... (when I have it)
     
  28. GeckoPunk

    GeckoPunk Initiate (163) Jul 29, 2012 Connecticut

    I get a little gung-ho when it comes to bringing my boil down to pitching temp ASAP.

    Although I typically freeze about 4 pans of ice 1 or 2 nights prior to brew day to assist my immersion wort chiller, sometimes it slips my mind, resulting in me going to get a couple bags of ice from the gas station 2 min from my house... I hate spending $ on ice :angry:, but I always feel much more relaxed seeing those small chunks and globs of coagulated proteins when filtering my boiled hops out of the wort and into the fermenter... :grinning:
     
  29. flagmantho

    flagmantho Poo-Bah (5,060) Feb 19, 2009 Washington
    Subscriber Beer Trader

    My typical mistake is wandering away during the wort chilling process and cooling the wort way below my intended pitching temperature. I have also accidentally run *hot* water through the wort chiller and come back after 15 minutes to find my wort still quite warm. D'oh!

    Of course, this step is toward the end of the brew day, when I likely have more than a few brewskis in me already.
     
    GeckoPunk likes this.
  30. b-one

    b-one Initiate (0) Feb 6, 2013 California

    Oh shit, forget that one too this time! Blow off is doing fine. Chill....
     
  31. cmmcdonn

    cmmcdonn Initiate (0) Jun 21, 2009 Virginia

    I'm known to forget getting my priming sugar ready before racking to my bottling bucket. I end up boiling it in the microwave and cooling it in the freezer with some foil over the top.
     
  32. epk

    epk Initiate (145) Jun 10, 2008 New Jersey

    It's funny what us homebrewers enjoy. I've seen some beautiful cold breaks, lol.
     
  33. Bubbalito

    Bubbalito Initiate (0) Jan 2, 2012 Virginia

    +1 to this. When I brew alone, I am pretty spot on with timing, note-taking, gear prep etc. When I brew with someone, I turn into a complete flake. I was so drunk by the end of a brew day one time, I woke up the next morning and couldn't remember if I pitched the yeast or not!?!?!?! I did, and the beer turned out great.
     
    MADhombrewer likes this.
  34. mikehartigan

    mikehartigan Aspirant (295) Apr 9, 2007 Illinois

    It's not really necessary to cool the priming sugar. 5 gallons of wort is more than enough to thermally overwhelm the relatively small quantity of sugar water.
     
  35. GeckoPunk

    GeckoPunk Initiate (163) Jul 29, 2012 Connecticut

    Lmfao... I could see myself the next day staring at the airlock wondering... "WTF, why ain't this thang bubblin' yet!?" :confused:

    Good to hear things out turned out great for you.
     
    Bubbalito likes this.
  36. GeckoPunk

    GeckoPunk Initiate (163) Jul 29, 2012 Connecticut

    It's funny because I like to pitch my yeast into an empty fermenter, then pouring the chilled wort on to the yeast thinking that the oxygenated wort will evenly "disperse" the yeast as I'm OCD thinking that pouring the yeast onto my wort will not mix up the yeast enough with the wort... even though I know that both ways of doing it always comes out the same (from what I've experienced)... Crazy stupid, but one of those moment when I think to myself, "Do you you repeat the the same mistake, over and over and..." :stuck_out_tongue:
     
  37. Naugled

    Naugled Crusader (737) Sep 25, 2007 New York
    Subscriber

    I try to do the same thing... when I remember.
     
  38. pweis909

    pweis909 Poo-Bah (1,599) Aug 13, 2005 Wisconsin
    Supporter Subscriber

    And as fate would have it, I forgot to add the whirlfloc yesterday...
     
  39. cavedave

    cavedave Poo-Bah (2,210) Mar 12, 2009 New York
    Beer Trader

    The only thing I consistently forget to do is to add the sugar to the boil for the recipes that call for it. Mental block.
     
  40. mikehartigan

    mikehartigan Aspirant (295) Apr 9, 2007 Illinois

    More often than not, I forget the Whirlfloc. But I see it as largely cosmetic, so I don't sweat it.
     
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