Drinking Pains: Beer and Gout

Discussion in 'Article Comments' started by BeerAdvocate, Jul 2, 2015.

  1. BeerAdvocate

    BeerAdvocate Founders (17,679) Aug 23, 1996 Massachusetts
    Moderator

    Beer has long been associated as a gout trigger due to its relatively high levels of purine, an organic compound that, among other functions, helps form the base of human DNA. Beer gets the bulk of its purine content from brewer’s yeast, which has about three times the purines as baker’s yeast.

    Read the full article: Drinking Pains: Beer and Gout
     
    #1 BeerAdvocate, Jul 2, 2015
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 11, 2017
  2. LOVEJOY

    LOVEJOY Initiate (0) Feb 21, 2014 Yukon (Canada)

    Some names of beer brands would be nice
    ..
     
  3. Matt1020

    Matt1020 Initiate (0) Nov 16, 2017

    I received my first major attack (diagnosed) when i was 29. I went to the hospital crying, didn't know what happened to my foot and just told them "I think I broke it".They were skeptical of course... Prior to this major attack I've always thought I rolled my ankle going to the bathroom at night. I really convinced myself i was doing this. I usually got it in my ankle but in the early stages (looking back) it def started in my big toe. I would say things like "FCK, I sprained my big toe" I was living an unhealthy lifestyle but not terribly out of shape. I can run a mile, ride my bike all day and swim for hours. My grandfather had gout really bad and my mom said his trigger was turkey. My most recent attack (2nd major this year) I think was caused by a week of heavy fast food and Guinness beer. 95% of the time I drink Coors Lite but I do enjoy other. I don't think I'll ever drink Guinness again... Which SUCKS. I was in German last April, drank tons of beer and had no issues. My DR said I can drink all the booz I want BC its the yeast thats the issues. But I hate booz. Although purines are in ALL food, there is no scientific evidence a vegetarian diet causes attacks. White wine is very low in purines also but who like white wine... Also, my only advice is DO NOT SOAK YOUR FOOT IN ICE WATER. for my first attack, when i thought it was a sprained ankle, I soaked my food in a bucket of ice water for 20 minutes... Cold crystallizes the uric acid faster... Do NOT soak your foot when you are having an attack. Buy a heating pad and allow blood to flow.
     
  4. Squire

    Squire Poo-Bah (2,150) Jul 16, 2015 Mississippi
    Society Trader

    It's an incredibly painful experience that commands your full attention. Solved mine with diet changes.
     
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  5. Elwarm

    Elwarm Initiate (0) Jun 10, 2018

    Squire, I was researching gout and came across this discussion group thread so I joined the group to ask you, what kind of diet changes does it take to cure gout? I would appreciate any advice you could share.
     
  6. Squire

    Squire Poo-Bah (2,150) Jul 16, 2015 Mississippi
    Society Trader

    Sure, contact your family physician and get a referral to a specialist. That's what I did and after consultation, full workup and follow up we were able to bring my condition under control with diet changes. Of course what worked for me might not work for you so get the correct diagnosis and best of luck.
     
  7. bbtkd

    bbtkd Poo-Bah (2,358) Sep 20, 2015 South Dakota
    Society Trader

    Yeah, see a doctor. If you've got mild gout, then diet may control it. BTW - no cure for gout, you can only avoid the triggers and/or take medication.

    I've had gout about 25 years. After a year or two, they put me on daily Allopurinol in order to avoid constant attacks. Every once in a while I'll get a twinge, and then take Indomethacin for a few days, but can't drink with that. I took up craft about 3 years ago after not drinking much for 25 years, and noted no increase in attacks. I do avoid the other triggers though. No problem giving up organ meat such as liver, heart, etc :wink:
     
    #7 bbtkd, Jun 10, 2018
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2018
  8. LifesAnesthesia

    LifesAnesthesia Crusader (704) Dec 17, 2014 Virginia
    Society

    Ah, the crappy thing about many of the gout medications is that they can mess with your liver. So in addition to beer being a triggering item, the medications one may need to control gout can really put you in a bad situation, if you love to drink beer.
     
  9. SaxmanRick

    SaxmanRick Devotee (489) May 7, 2012 Minnesota

    I have found that a glass of tart cherry juice each day is quite effective at treating and preventing gout. When I skip it for a few days, the gout flares up.
     
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  10. IPeh

    IPeh Initiate (60) Nov 3, 2010 British Columbia (Canada)

    I had a pretty harsh attack of gout a month or so ago, which came at the end of a summer where I drank very little other than hazy IPA's. I know that purines are extremely high in brewers yeast, and are the main cause of gout. My question is, does the haziness in hazy IPAs stem mainly from yeast, or are there other things in there? Is a hazy IPA worse for you than a clear IPA with the same ABV? Are there any suggestions for good filtered low alcohol beers with the hoppyness I've come to enjoy?
     
    #10 IPeh, Nov 18, 2018
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 18, 2018
  11. SFACRKnight

    SFACRKnight Meyvn (1,305) Jan 20, 2012 Colorado
    Trader

    Haze is derived from polyphenols usually, yeast shouldn't be the cause of the haze.
     
  12. Zorro

    Zorro Poo-Bah (4,399) Dec 25, 2003 California

    Get tested for Hyperuricemia. Lots of modern doctors don't test for it.

    Alcohol is probably not the cause. You just are the lucky one in 200 that has high blood uric acid levels.

    Then get the pill for that, Allopurinol. It costs about $4 a month.
     
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  13. Brewday

    Brewday Initiate (128) Dec 25, 2015 New York

    I've had gout twice in the last year and i think it's more from food then beer. I drink unfiltered beer almost every day. I'll probably get it again from thanksgiving turkey and will have to overdose on ibuprofen.
     
  14. kemoarps

    kemoarps Meyvn (1,430) Apr 30, 2008 Washington
    Trader

    Also with the gout... as stated I don't think the hazies themselves are any worse for it than other styles... triggers are different for different people. The three main ones (as you probably know) are aged cheeses, red meats, and beer. Thankfully for me it's the aged cheeses that are mine, and while I love me some bleu cheese (or at least did. sad face), that's slightly easier for me to give up than beer or red meat.
    I've also noticed that it's a lot worse if I'm somewhat dehydrated, and that regardless of the trigger, the onset seems to be much quicker than 'I drank a lot of _____ over the course of the summer and several months later I had a flare up'
    For what it's worth.

    @Brewday, ibuprofen is going to be pretty limited in how much it can help for gout pain, if you can get a script for indomethacin, it is in a similar class, but is a bit more effective for gout and arthritis and the like.
     
  15. bbtkd

    bbtkd Poo-Bah (2,358) Sep 20, 2015 South Dakota
    Society Trader

    Allopurinol works great for ongoing prevention. I've been on a heavy dose of it for 25 years because the attacks were constant without it. Beating gout attacks down with indomethacin works, but is very hard on your stomach. I still get an attack every year or two, and take indomethacin only as long as I need to because it's nasty stuff. My doctor told me about a new gout medication that apparently works much better than Allopurinol but he's reluctant to switch me to it until it becombues generic, due to cost.
     
  16. honkey

    honkey Zealot (550) Aug 28, 2010 Arizona
    Society Industry

    Common myth which was enhanced on this very site a while back. Polyphenols may cause some of the haze, as does yeast. If it’s not filtered, it will have some yeast in it (even with beers that look crystal clear and were well fined). If you see yeast cells under a microscope with these beers, that just means they have a LOT of yeast.
     
  17. SFACRKnight

    SFACRKnight Meyvn (1,305) Jan 20, 2012 Colorado
    Trader

    I've seen slides of trill and a few other haze kings that have less yeast in suspension than most clear ipas. Hoof hearted on the other hand...
     
  18. honkey

    honkey Zealot (550) Aug 28, 2010 Arizona
    Society Industry

    Funny. When people started saying yeast wasn’t a factor, Trillium was one that I put through a filtration flask. I got less yeast on the filter than with Treehouse and Alchemist, but still got yeast
     
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  19. honkey

    honkey Zealot (550) Aug 28, 2010 Arizona
    Society Industry

    Also, I didn’t actually measure their yeast cells, but they appeared to be smaller cells than what I’m used to seeing. Originally I wondered if they ran the beer through a coarse filter and if the small cells were all that made it through. I don’t know if that’s the case or if their yeast strain has just has a smaller cell structure
     
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  20. EvenMoreJesus

    EvenMoreJesus Champion (886) Jun 8, 2017 Pennsylvania
    Society Trader

    Who would have ever thought that a doctor's advice would be better than that from untrained, random people on a beer website?
     
  21. elohim

    elohim Initiate (183) Dec 4, 2010 Georgia
    Trader

    Certainly not me.
     
  22. Milktoast75

    Milktoast75 Devotee (437) Oct 27, 2012 Wisconsin
    Society

    I usually take the advice I like. Not the best advice. Human nature.
    Several friends suffer from gout. One is heavier drinker and not just beer. By using meds with no change in alcohol consumption he seems to maintain.
     
  23. EvenMoreJesus

    EvenMoreJesus Champion (886) Jun 8, 2017 Pennsylvania
    Society Trader

    I'm definitely not saying that you should always trust your doctor, either, as much of "medicine" is simply doing what is most popular among your colleagues with little to no actual science behind it. That said, that advice still tends to be better than taking advice from people who have no formal training and probably have zero idea of what the science/research says about the subject at hand.
     
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  24. elohim

    elohim Initiate (183) Dec 4, 2010 Georgia
    Trader

    I wish the best to your friend but having an n=1 experiment generally means very little
     
  25. Alefflicted

    Alefflicted Initiate (79) Dec 2, 2017 Minnesota

    Hey now, some of the best (and worse, but lets not focus of the negatives :wink:), advice I've ever received was from the random people on a beer website.
     
  26. bbtkd

    bbtkd Poo-Bah (2,358) Sep 20, 2015 South Dakota
    Society Trader

    Many doctors would advise patients with gout not to drink at all because even if your medicine is preventing attacks, you're still getting joint deterioration. That said, full speed ahead for me :wink:

    I don't want to be laying in my deathbed with a heart condition, thinking damn I didn't need to give up beer because of gout!
     
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  27. EvenMoreJesus

    EvenMoreJesus Champion (886) Jun 8, 2017 Pennsylvania
    Society Trader

    My issue with anything like this is that people aren't born with gout, so it's something that they're doing that's causing it. Better to find the issue and solve it than to just try to cheat your way around it. Never had gout, personally, but if I did develop it, finding my next beer would that last of my worries.

    Gotta die of something, right?
     
  28. bbtkd

    bbtkd Poo-Bah (2,358) Sep 20, 2015 South Dakota
    Society Trader

    If you have gout, Gout attacks can be triggered by something you're eating/drinking, but having/getting Gout isn't caused by eating/drinking things. Your body is just overproducing uric acid, or the kidneys aren't removing it like they should. Some can manage Gout through diet, but when it gets more extreme then meds are needed. So - subtle difference between what causes Gout and what triggers Gout attacks.
     
  29. EvenMoreJesus

    EvenMoreJesus Champion (886) Jun 8, 2017 Pennsylvania
    Society Trader

    Undoubtedly, but it's STILL something that the person is doing. Have you heard a better theory as to causation? If you have, I'd love to hear it. Whether it be gout, pseudogout, type 2 diabetes, high serum cholesterol, or any other metabolic abnormality, it is the person's inability to adapt to their environment that is causing the issue, whether that environment is exogenous or endogenous or both, is the question.
     
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  30. Belachos

    Belachos Initiate (26) Jul 23, 2016 New Jersey

    All pilsners are ok for goit. Warsteiners, Pilsner Urquell, Spaten.....just look for the pilsner brands. As for best goit avoidance methods, two shot glasses of tart cherry juice daily + 2 Tart Cherry tablets daily or consume fresh or canned whole cherries.(GNC for tablets) .also drink a lot of water daily. For meds if I get in serious trouble, Aleve, Prednisone, Colchicine all work. Aleve 2 tablets Day one and stop. Wait 24-48 hours for relief. Repeat 1 tab Day 3. If no relief see doctor for prednisone or colchicine.
     
  31. HogWort

    HogWort Initiate (66) Apr 25, 2010 Pennsylvania

    Do you recall what the newer medication is called?
     
  32. nc41

    nc41 Poo-Bah (1,766) Sep 25, 2008 North Carolina
    Trader

    Had a guy years ago that worked for me, lived in NH, he wouldn’t eat shellfish he thought the iodine in the food triggered his gout. He’d get it so bad he’d be bed ridden. Not a clue if it’s a trigger, but he was a very smart man.
     
  33. bbtkd

    bbtkd Poo-Bah (2,358) Sep 20, 2015 South Dakota
    Society Trader

    He didn't tell me.
     
  34. brewme

    brewme Defender (611) Mar 1, 2014 Massachusetts
    Trader

    I take apple cider vinegar & turmeric tablets daily, & that has worked wonders (I have heard tart cherry tablets too, but can never find them).
     
  35. southdenverhoo

    southdenverhoo Disciple (367) Aug 13, 2004 Colorado

    I can’t say enough about colchicine. I’ve never used allopurinol, thinking I’m sort of “saving” that for when I really need it. I almost never have an attack anymore, because at the first sort of tingle I’ll do a little Colchicine regimen. (Two tabs, then one tab 3 hours later, repeat each morning for until warning signs go away.)

    Unfortunately some drug company got a patent on colchicine (a centuries old remedy) and its now sold in the US as Mitigare or Colcrys, at a ridiculous price. Still available outside the US over the counter; I can buy 60 tabs in Mexico for less than my copay for a Mitigare scrip for 20 tabs here. And because of diet changes, 60 tabs is about a 3 year supply even though I pop them as a prophylactic if I even feel a twinge in my toe.
     
  36. Sammy

    Sammy Poo-Bah (13,215) Dec 1, 2003 Ontario (Canada)

    colchicine is plant based, and can be used in a pinch, but allopurinol saved me. Get your uric numbers down preferably below 300. If you like beer, and you get gout attacks they are related. You need the meds.
     
  37. drinkin-beeers

    drinkin-beeers Disciple (361) Jan 29, 2014 Montana

    Tried to do the apple cider vinegar and couldn’t stomach it the first time. Vomited almost instantly and now the smell alone sends me gagging towards the bathroom.
     
  38. CheeLayBearDay

    CheeLayBearDay Initiate (83) Mar 14, 2011 California

    I try to eat jalapeño cheddar bratwurst when I drink, the capsaicin in the jalapeño pretty much guarantees that I won’t contract gout. Plus I always use those tissue paper things when I’m dropping a deuce on a public toilet (you can never be too safe).