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  1. threeviews

    threeviews Zealot (567) Apr 18, 2011 Florida

    I have searched and searched again, but am unable to find a resting spot for my understanding:

    My collection of glassware is large (and continually growing), however I am wondering how many my fellow http://www.beeradvocate.com members take nucleation into consideration when pouring?

    I find that nucleated glassware provides a superior olfactory experience, yet knocks the carbonation out of the beer...that said, a beer in a nucleated glass is just about flat if you take up-to-an-hour to consume said beer. Case and point: Dogfish's Burton Baton stands to be one of my favorite beers, all-time. However, at 10% ABV, it is a monster and needs to be treated as such (i.e. sipped). However, the recommended glassware (per the website) is the (signature) "IPA Glass" developed by Dogfish and Sierra. Although the sensory experience is elevated (and exquisite) for Burton Baton in that glass, if I take any longer than 45min-1hr to consume, the beer seems to loose much of its luster. Am I completely off the mark?

    I would like to ask you all as to how you feel about this issue and whether or not you prefer nucleated or non-nucleated glassware (especially when it comes to bigger beers).

    As of this post, my favorite style is the Rastal Teku 2.0 glass of which is non-nucleated.

    Cheers,
    B
     
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  2. poorbuthappy

    poorbuthappy Initiate (0) Mar 6, 2014 New Jersey

    You should drink faster.
     
  3. dennis3951

    dennis3951 Savant (919) Mar 6, 2008 New Jersey

    What is Nucleated glass?
     
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  4. riverlen

    riverlen Initiate (0) Sep 16, 2009 Illinois

    What the heck is a Nucleated glass? I think beer in any kind of a glass is going to lose some fizz after it sits there for an hour, although that is just a theory, I have yet to actually experience a beer sitting that long. Why don't you just pour yourself half the beer and keep the balance in the fridge, then come back to it when you're ready?
     
  5. poorbuthappy

    poorbuthappy Initiate (0) Mar 6, 2014 New Jersey

    It's a rough, etched ring in the bottom of the glass that gives the carbonation a point to form and bubble from.

    If you have a spiegelau IPA glass look at the bottom and you'll see the nucleation point.
     
  6. WVUbrew

    WVUbrew Devotee (406) Oct 12, 2013 North Carolina
    Trader

    Nucleated glasses are good if you guzzle your beer but if you like to spend some time sipping then it just loses carbonation quicker. With that said I love them for beers like Boston Lager, pale ales and lighter body IPA's.
     
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  7. SlightlyGrey

    SlightlyGrey Zealot (524) Apr 4, 2011 Minnesota

    Sooo, what's more important to you: smelling the beer or keeping the carbonation?
     
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  8. charlzm

    charlzm Poo-Bah (2,151) Sep 3, 2007 California

    I put lighter-bodied and more fragrant beers in nucleated glass and save my snifters and such for bigger, ABV-heavy brews.
     
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  9. PVMT

    PVMT Initiate (0) Aug 10, 2014 New York

    Smelling the beer. Most of what I drink seems to be of pretty low carbonation, anyway.
     
  10. drtth

    drtth Poo-Bah (4,006) Nov 25, 2007 Pennsylvania

    Well, it depends on the beer style, but as a general rule I use either the Duvel glass (nucleated) or the no-nix imperial pint glass. Sometimes I prefer one sometimes I prefer the other, with the Duvel glass being used for more delicately falvored beers where the effects of aroma on flavor benefit from enhancement.
     
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  11. TommyTheHat

    TommyTheHat Initiate (0) Jul 30, 2014 Pennsylvania

    I've tried and I've tried but I can't seem to get a beer to last that long. In an hour I'd have gone through bomber of 12% abv beer already. But that is an interesting point and one I am waiting to get a definitive answer for. I never thought the etching mattered that much to lessen carbonation. I like the way it keeps a little head. (a little head is always a good thing right?:sunglasses:) but now you have me wondering about carbonation.
     
  12. WVUbrew

    WVUbrew Devotee (406) Oct 12, 2013 North Carolina
    Trader

    Depends on the beer!

    But I'd keep the carb longer to be honest.

    I don't have much trouble smelling my beers in the first place and don't spend much time doing so unless it's barrel aged.
     
  13. mikeburd1128

    mikeburd1128 Zealot (542) Oct 28, 2011 New Jersey

    Thanks for bringing this up. I've really never given this much thought. But being as I almost always spend a lot of time with each beer, I'll definitely be more aware of this moving forward.
     
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  14. tylerstravis

    tylerstravis Meyvn (1,037) Feb 14, 2014 Colorado

    I tend to like lower carbonation than most people, so maybe I need to get my hands on a nucleated snifter :slight_smile:

    (Thanks for teaching me a new word)
     
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  15. WesMantooth

    WesMantooth Poo-Bah (2,652) Jan 8, 2014 Ohio
    Trader

    I use the Sam Adams perfect pint for most beers. Best of both worlds. I thought it seemed gimmicky at first, but you can really smell your beer in this thing. The big bell and top together are like a combination of a teku and snifter. The tapered bottom is great for holding, but also rolls the beer into the wide part if you watch. The etching keeps the carbonation going.
    [​IMG]
     
  16. threeviews

    threeviews Zealot (567) Apr 18, 2011 Florida

    For the posts thus far, I have learned the following:
    1) Many a person is not aware of a nucleated glass
    2) People who are aware of said glassware do agree that significant carbonation is lost when consuming a volume of beer (~12oz) over a 1hr span.

    An additional question...if you are familiar with a particular beer/brewery that tends to carbonate their beers at a higher dissovled CO2 ratio (i.e. more bubbly) and you have the option, do you conscientiously choose nucleated or non-nucleated glassware?

    Thanks for the responses...I hope to see some more!
     
    Smidge likes this.
  17. WVUbrew

    WVUbrew Devotee (406) Oct 12, 2013 North Carolina
    Trader

    IMO: If the beer is highly carbonated (Belgians, wild ales, etc...) There's not really any point in having a nucleated glass since it's already going to be effervescent in any glass you choose.

    Bottom line, get one and just experiment for yourself. They're great glasses for everyday common beers! I also recommend that Sam Adams perfect pint glass.
     
  18. DelMontiac

    DelMontiac Defender (657) Oct 22, 2010 Oklahoma

    Not a fan of those "degassers" in the bottom of my beer glass.
     
  19. AlcahueteJ

    AlcahueteJ Meyvn (1,088) Dec 4, 2004 Massachusetts

    I enjoy my Duvel and Sam Adams glasses, but don't find them necessary. I'm also a glassware collector, more for fun than function.

    That being said, somehow beer drinkers in the UK and Germany have got by for hundreds of years without nucleated glasses. And doppelbocks are certainly big beers.

    [​IMG]
     
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  20. SensorySupernova

    SensorySupernova Initiate (0) Mar 21, 2014 California

    You could try pouring half of the bottle into your fancy glass, drinking that, then coming back for the rest of the bottle when you've finished.
     
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  21. FATC1TY

    FATC1TY Champion (863) Feb 12, 2012 Georgia

    I like both.. No reason to stick to one kind.

    I like nucleated glasses for IPAs and beers I want to smell more.

    Beers that take me longer to drink, like BA beers, old ales, barleywines, etc... I'm fine with a good thin snifter, as I like to drink it cold, cool, and almost room temp to taste the differences.
     
  22. skunkpuddle

    skunkpuddle Initiate (0) Feb 14, 2011 California

    That would be to simple. People tend to try to make things complex.
     
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  23. Smidge

    Smidge Initiate (99) Jun 25, 2014 California

    I now know what a nucleated glass is thanks for the knowledge.
     
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  24. dianimal

    dianimal Aspirant (231) Apr 18, 2012 California

    I really wanted to make a joke about this, but now I am intrigued. I must investigate!
     
  25. misternebbie

    misternebbie Initiate (0) Aug 24, 2014 Pennsylvania

    I use Nucleated glassware for one major reason, my beer distributor gave me a ton of Sam Adams glasses, oh the perks of frequent flying!
    Nebbie
     
  26. LutherBrau

    LutherBrau Initiate (0) Sep 1, 2014 Massachusetts

    Love my Sam glasses and love the olfactory experience. My pours rarely last long enough for carbonation loss to be much of a factor:sunglasses:
     
  27. Highbrow

    Highbrow Devotee (436) Jan 7, 2011 California
    Trader

    ...tell the truth. does not the diagram look like someone's drawing of a full figured woman from about the waist down, with her feet together? not to mention a bulls-eye @ the chest - head level... :astonished::grinning:
     
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  28. bennetj17

    bennetj17 Meyvn (1,390) Oct 30, 2005 Arizona

    Nucleated glasses seem like a gimmick to me. I don't think it really makes a difference.
     
  29. glass_house

    glass_house Zealot (576) Jan 10, 2014 Ohio
    Trader

    As others have mentioned, there really is no universal answer. Nucleation, while somewhat gimmicky, certainly does serve a functional purpose. For beers with medium to high carbonation and less pronounced aromas (e.g. pilsners), a nucleated glass can certainly accentuate the aroma release. Of course, there is the off chance that over the course of time the carbonation could be diminished to the point that the beer suffers for it. However, it's not as if your beer will be depleted of carbonation in 15 minutes. If it takes you an hour to drink a 12-16 oz. light lager, that beer is going to suffer the effect of time and temperature regardless of nucleation.

    Most stouts and higher gravity styles that are intended to have lower carbonation see very little benefit from nucleation in my opinion.
     
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  30. BeerWizard

    BeerWizard Disciple (331) Dec 22, 2012 Colorado

    I only read this to learn what a nucleated glass was. I do have a set of those Spiegelau IPA glasses, but personally I don't notice myself "enjoying" my IPA's in them any more than the goblets I normally use. My wife's obsessed with them, though.
     
  31. otispdriftwood

    otispdriftwood Initiate (0) Dec 9, 2011 Colorado

    Nucleated glass vs. non-nucleated glass.
    Tulip or straight pint glass.
    Is there more or less carbonation in this beer.
    Do I want smell or carbonation.
    What kind of beer goes with what kind of glass.
    How long will it take me to drink this beer.
    Yada, yada, yada.


    If I had to think about all of this before I had a beer, I'd probably give up drinking.
     
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  32. Quickicks

    Quickicks Initiate (0) Aug 26, 2013 North Carolina

    This is why my favorite all around glass lately has been my mini nonic pint w/ nucleation from FW.
    [​IMG]

    It's perfect size to share or to savor, works well with most styles, and with smaller pours the loss of carb while drinking isn't an issue. That being said, I wouldn't dome a larger abv beer that benefits from carb in a nucleated glass. Beers such as pale ales, IPAs, porters, other sessionable beers are more suited for nucleated glassware.
     
  33. rather

    rather Aspirant (202) May 31, 2013 California

    nuculation site is one of my favorite terms. so yes I prefer my glasses to have one.
     
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  34. Quickicks

    Quickicks Initiate (0) Aug 26, 2013 North Carolina

    Some of us enjoy thinking :wink:
     
  35. otispdriftwood

    otispdriftwood Initiate (0) Dec 9, 2011 Colorado


    I love to think, just not when I drink.
     
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  36. ubenumber2

    ubenumber2 Initiate (0) Sep 1, 2012 Arkansas

    When you spend all day chasing beer trucks and hounding liquor store managers spending daddy's money you have a lot of time to think about things like this , lol
     
  37. azorie

    azorie Champion (884) Mar 18, 2006 Florida

    #37 azorie, Sep 12, 2014
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2014
  38. WesMantooth

    WesMantooth Poo-Bah (2,652) Jan 8, 2014 Ohio
    Trader

    Well said. I tend to use mine for lagers and pilsners. Beers that don't have an overwhelming aroma and it does make a difference. You really get that wort/mash aroma that you normally don't from others.
     
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  39. RaphaelSC

    RaphaelSC Aspirant (268) Apr 2, 2013 Brazil

    I tend to use the glass accord to the recommended type and it aways worked for me.
     
  40. DougC123

    DougC123 Disciple (328) Aug 21, 2012 Connecticut


    I find that with the DFH glass it isn't so much the time, it is the number of times you sip. The triple wave at the bottom is just too much agitation. So if you like to drink your beers in two or three gulps you will be just fine with that glass. I drink quickly, but the beer is always lifeless at the end with that glass. I think the Sam Admas glass is just the right amount of ripple at the bottom and works very well.
     
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