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Got some used gas/beer lines...what do?

Discussion in 'Home Bar' started by mychalg9, May 1, 2013.

  1. mychalg9

    Beer Trader

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    So I got three kegs and a CO2 tank about a year ago from my brother (he had been holding a friends homebrew stuff and the guy said I could use them), so all I had needed was a regulator and gas/beer lines. I was going to buy them online for roughly $100, then I was helping my brother move this past weekend and noticed that he actually had the regulator and gas/beer lines at his apartment, so he let me take them. Should I just buy new lines? Or can I clean these? How much are the gas/beer lines to replace? Any other maintenance that needs to be done on anything?
     
  2. PortLargo

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    Congrats, wish I had a brother like that . . .

    Gas lines are virtually maintenance free. Unless they have some obvious grit/grease/gunk on the inside, nothing much can go wrong.

    Beer lines require love and nurture. They are in constant contact with your precious beer, and really must be as clean and sanitized as possible. If they were properly cleaned after the last use they may be all right. But I wouldn't trust it, just spring for some new ones. When you set up beer taps you have several variables such as pressure, balancing beer lines, and type faucet that you must work through. With new lines you can eliminate the "fouled line" taste problem.

    You didn't ask, but I recommend you go ahead and spring for a real line-cutter, quick disconnects with MFL's, and upgrade to Oetikier clamps. Also, you are gonna have leaks. Do your troubleshooting before you add the brew. Respect your beer.

    I buy online and cost is in the neighborhood of 50ยข to a buck per foot for either type. Buying twice what you think you need is a good starting point.
     
  3. DougC123

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    Make sure you buy beer line and not bulk plastic tubing, there is a difference. When you order it should specifically say beer line or food grade. The roll at Home Depot won't do.
     
  4. Genuine

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    Beer line is cheap enough to replace, so I would go ahead and order new line.
     
  5. JrGtr

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    Like other's said, you could probably use the gas line if it doesn't seem to dirty, but IMO, why chance it? Spring for new lines all around. The kegs and regualtor are the expensive parts of the system.
     
  6. mikehartigan

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    FWIW, I picked up 50' each of 5/16" gas line and 3/16" beer line when I built my system (I got an excellent price on ebay for the gas line). Waaaaay more than I needed, but it gives me the flexibility to replace things whenever the mood hits, or whenever I'm just not sure (when in doubt, throw it out).
     
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