Hops Potency/Utilization

Discussion in 'Homebrewing' started by CShell1234, Dec 2, 2018.

  1. CShell1234

    CShell1234 Initiate (18) Oct 25, 2018 New York

    Hey guys, I was wondering if there was a way to tell how potent a certain hop would be compared to another. Other than experience (although I will accept any and all of your experiences as well), can you just compare alpha acids or do some kind of mathematical equation like AA x oils?
    Thanks!
     
  2. VikeMan

    VikeMan Meyvn (1,469) Jul 12, 2009 Pennsylvania

    It would be nice if there were a formula. Alpha Acids tell you how much bitterness can be obtained (basically), but have little to do with the flavor/aroma "potency" of the hops. But you can look up the percentages and amounts of various hop oils for just about any hop variety. You just need to know what oils you are interested in. Is there a particular aroma/flavor you are seeking?
     
  3. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (3,712) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
    Premium

    The AA% is a clear indicator of hop potency from a bitterness perspective.

    As regards the potency of hop aroma/flavor if you can obtain hop lot analysis of the essential oils of the hops you purchased that could be helpful. The challenge is that there are hundreds of compounds that provide flavor/aroma and typically just a handful of these are measured on a per lot basis. But some information is 'better' than no information?

    Cheers!
     
  4. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (3,712) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
    Premium

    If you purchase hops from YCH they provide a lot number on the packet. You can then go to the YCH website and enter that lot number to see additional information like:

    Hop Analysis Legend

    • Analysis Method
    The specific technique and process used to achieve a desired measurement of a hop or beer product

    • Lot Number
    An alpha numeric identification number assigned to a specific lot of hops produced at YCH typically found on the outside of packaging

    • Variety
    A specific strain of hops

    • UV Alpha
    Percent of Alpha Acids analyzed by the UV spectrophotometric method HOPS-6A published by The American Society of Brewing Chemists

    • UV Beta
    Percent of Beta Acids analyzed by the UV spectrophotometric method HOPS-6A published by The American Society of Brewing Chemists

    • HSI
    Acronym for Hop Storage Index, which measures the rate at which your hops age in storage. It is the ratio of two different wavelengths of UV light measured through the samples in question. As the alpha and beta compounds degrade, the ratio widens and the HSI increases.

    • Moisture
    Moisture refers to the moisture levels found in hop cultivars. Moisture content influences the stability of hops before processing or brewing and indicates if pellets have been properly produced. Through moisture analysis, brewers gain invaluable knowledge regarding the quality of their hops and storage stability.

    • Oil by Dist
    The percent of total oil analyzed by the steam distillation method HOPS-13 published by The American Society of Brewing Chemists

    • HPLC Alpha
    Percent of Alpha Acids analyzed by the HPLC method HOPS-14 published by The American Society of Brewing Chemists, also method EBC 7.7 published by the European Brewery Convention

    • HPLC Beta
    Percent of Beta Acids analyzed by the HPLC method HOPS-14 published by The American Society of Brewing Chemists, also method EBC 7.7 published by the European Brewery Convention.

    • HPLC Co-Humulone
    Percent cohumulone analyzed by the HPLC method HOPS-14 published by The American Society of Brewing Chemists, also method EBC 7.7 published by the European Brewery Convention

    • HPLC Colupulone
    Percent of colupulone analyzed by the HPLC method HOPS-14 published by The American Society of Brewing Chemists, also method EBC 7.7 published by the European Brewery Convention

    • Mebak Alpha 75
    Percent of Alpha Acids analyzed by the titration method EBC 7.5 published by the European Brewery Convention.

    • LCV Alpha 74
    Percent of Alpha Acids analyzed by the titration method EBC 7.4 published by the European Brewery Convention.

    • Oil B Pinene
    One of the essential oils found in hop cultivars, characterized by woody, grassy, earthy and pine aromas.

    • Oil Myrcene
    One of the essential oils found in hop cultivars, characterized by fruity, herbal and woody aromas with earthy and citrus flavors.

    • Oil Linalool
    One of the many hop compounds. Although linalool constitutes a tiny percentage of hop oils, combined with geraniol, it strongly affects the aroma of beer.

    • Oil Caryophyllene
    One of the essential oils found in hop cultivars and is characterized by woody, spicy and earthy aromas.

    • Oil Farnesene
    One of four primary essential hop oils. Although farnesene makes up a very low percentage of total oil in most hop varieties, it is considered significant because it makes up a substantial proportion of some noble hops.

    • Oil Humulene
    One of four primary components of hop essential oil.

    • Oil Geraniol
    One of the essential oils found in some hop cultivars and many American varieties, characterized by floral and citrus aroma.

    • Crop Year
    The year that a specific lot of hops is harvested

    https://tools.yakimachief.com/lookup
     
  5. CShell1234

    CShell1234 Initiate (18) Oct 25, 2018 New York

    As it pertains to this question, no I don’t have a particular flavor in mind. I’ve just seen people in different threads talk about how they didn’t get much from this hop or that hop really overpowered the other one and I wondered if there was a way to know beforehand.
    But as far as particular flavors, do you have a particular website or post that lists the flavors from particular oils?

    Edit: just noticed there is a list of them on the post that @JackHorzempa just posted!
     
    #5 CShell1234, Dec 2, 2018
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2018
  6. VikeMan

    VikeMan Meyvn (1,469) Jul 12, 2009 Pennsylvania

    Well, there's the site @JackHorzempa posted above. And there are hundreds of threads in this forum on the subject. And various versions of a hop "aroma wheel" (google it). And there's the book "For the Love of Hops."
     
    CShell1234 likes this.
  7. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (3,712) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
    Premium

    But keep in mind that only a few of the essential oils in hops are in that above list.

    “The oxygenated hydrocarbon compounds are more soluble and aromatic. Their aromas, or new ones resulting from the fermentation process, are more likely to show up in finished beer. They include linalool, geraniol, citronellol, and hundreds of other compounds.”

    https://beerandbrewing.com/hops-oils--aroma-uncharted-waters/

    Have you read the book For the Love of Hops by Stan Hieronymus? If you want to learn more about hops I would strongly recommend this book to you.

    https://www.amazon.com/Love-Hops-Pr...43775074&sr=8-1&keywords=For+the+LOve+of+hops

    Cheers!
     
    CShell1234 likes this.
  8. CShell1234

    CShell1234 Initiate (18) Oct 25, 2018 New York

    Thanks! I will definitely check out both of those!
     
  9. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (3,712) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
    Premium

    Permit me to ‘repeat’ the subtitle of the article I linked above:

    “Researchers recently have begun to unravel the mystery of hops aroma, but many unknowns remain.”

    Another resource is to subscribe to the Stan Hieronymus’ e-mail announced blog:

    https://tinyletter.com/fortheloveofhops

    Cheers!
     
  10. pweis909

    pweis909 Poo-Bah (1,755) Aug 13, 2005 Wisconsin
    Premium

    @CShell1234 Each hop harvest will exhibit variation in the various essential oils and alpha acid contents. From one year to the next, location to location, hops may come across as more or less robust in regard to these dimensions. For example supposedly some of the more pungent aromatics (onion, for instance) may dominate if hops have been on the vine too long, and how long too long is will vary with local and regional conditions. So the various resources out there that purport to tell you what to expect in a hop variety are typically going to be imprecise for the bag of hops you find at the homebrew shop. Typically you'll have information on alpha acid content from what is hopefully a sample representative of your hop bag, maybe beta acids, but no additional info.
     
    CShell1234 likes this.
  11. Brewday

    Brewday Initiate (118) Dec 25, 2015 New York

    You would think AA % mattered but i recently got a bag of low AA Huell melon from LD Carlson that blew high AA hops like Eldorado away in aroma.
     
    CShell1234 likes this.
  12. EvenMoreJesus

    EvenMoreJesus Champion (866) Jun 8, 2017 Pennsylvania
    Premium Trader

    If by "potency" you mean "aroma and flavor potential", oil composition would probably be your best bet, but, as has been said, the phenomenon is pretty poorly understood and there are many, many variables to consider.

    http://www.hopslist.com/hops/
     
    CShell1234 likes this.
  13. pweis909

    pweis909 Poo-Bah (1,755) Aug 13, 2005 Wisconsin
    Premium

    That's cool, as usually people seem a little underwhelmed by Huell melon, like the name sets them up for more than the hop delivers. My own experience was subtly tasty. Will be brewing something with them again soon.