How is COVID-19 impacting your beer advocacy?

Discussion in 'Beer Talk' started by elNopalero, Mar 3, 2020.

  1. AlcahueteJ

    AlcahueteJ Poo-Bah (1,942) Dec 4, 2004 Massachusetts
    Society

    Those are two rather large reads. What in particular were you highlighting?

    I did notice that the first link recommends masks though.

    "In areas with community transmission of COVID-19, wearing a medical or non-medical face mask is recommended in confined public spaces (such as stores, supermarkets and public transport)."

    Here is an incredible resource for all things masks, it's run by MIT if I recall correctly.

    There's studies underway for mask innovation here in the Northeast through collaboration efforts between BioPharm companies and schools such as MIT. The goal is to improve masks for functions specifically geared towards preventing viral transmission.

    https://www.n95decon.org/

    A few things here:

    1) I was speaking about precautions taken during a pandemic. I can't image a flu epidemic is treated the same regarding rules and restrictions as a pandemic.

    2) They only started tracking flu seasons in 1999 (at least per the article you linked).

    3) 5 million is 4% of Japan's population. The US' worst flu season since 2010 was 45 million cases. That's 14% of the population. Whatever they're doing appears to work better than what we do.

    4) I did say Asian countries overall. I could look at deaths from all causes during the pandemic and find a long list of countries that fared better than the US (although Japan did extremely well in this regard).

    Interesting, I have definitely heard Remdesivir may not be as effective as originally thought.

    Although the last line kind of mucks up the conclusion a bit...

    "Thus, there are now 3 RCTs of remdesivir in hospitalized patients with differing results, raising the question of whether the discrepancies are artifacts of study design choices, including patient populations, or whether the drug is less efficacious than hoped."

    There's variables here though which could impact results. Where did you get Covid? What do you and your coworkers do outside of work? What precautions outside of work were taken?

    Also, were the masks worn properly? Were they reused?

    Yes, the virus is small, but it is carried and transmitted in larger droplets which are in fact blocked by masks (to a certain degree of course depending on the type of mask).

    Here's a good article with a video explaining how masks work and how the virus transmits through respiratory droplets.

    https://www.nytimes.com/interactive...te=1&user_id=9e162b5e4d959e84ec9492a7fd359c66

    This is an excellent point, and I was discussing with @unlikelyspiderperson in a separate thread how I think population density is the largest driving factor regarding transmission.

    I also don't think widespread lockdowns are necessarily effective, they need to be targeted for certain areas, and with restrictions that make sense. I'm also always open to being wrong, or have new studies and data that produce different theories.
     
  2. unlikelyspiderperson

    unlikelyspiderperson Poo-Bah (2,110) Mar 12, 2013 California
    Society Trader

    I was thinking more about this while listening to some podcasts at work this weekend. And I'm betting a combination of population density and the prevalence of chronic inflammatory conditions in the population would give you a pretty interesting map to compare to covid hotspots.

    Zach Bush brought up early in 2020 a correlation he had observed between early waves of of the pandemic and the prevalence of a mix of small particulate air pollution and dense population near by intensive ag areas with soils noted to be high in arsenic. His theory was that a combination of particulate air pollution mixed with ag drift and arsenic whipped up by tillage were likely leading sources of population wide susceptibility.
     
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  3. HouseofWortship

    HouseofWortship Meyvn (1,366) May 3, 2016 Illinois
    Society Trader

    I agree- the dense people are the largest driving factor in transmission.:grin:
     
    AlcahueteJ likes this.
  4. unlikelyspiderperson

    unlikelyspiderperson Poo-Bah (2,110) Mar 12, 2013 California
    Society Trader

    They do do this, they just generally give pretty marginal advice that just happens to favor the profit margin of industrial food processors. Imagine if the government invested in actual nutritional research and provided clear guidance on dietary and supplementary regiments that could reliably produce robust health
     
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  5. Chipotle

    Chipotle Aspirant (204) Apr 23, 2017 New York

    True but even if the government's nutritional advice was good there are apparently millions of Americans that interpret government suggested health measures as an infringement on personal liberties. Which is the crux of that post.
     
  6. unlikelyspiderperson

    unlikelyspiderperson Poo-Bah (2,110) Mar 12, 2013 California
    Society Trader

    Fixed that for you. No one is protesting recommendations or suggestions
     
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  7. Chipotle

    Chipotle Aspirant (204) Apr 23, 2017 New York

    Oh gee, Thanks for fixing that. Makes the covidiots seem so reasonable.
     
  8. unlikelyspiderperson

    unlikelyspiderperson Poo-Bah (2,110) Mar 12, 2013 California
    Society Trader

    About as reasonable as your conflation of a mandate and a recommendation, as well as your use of a disparaging nick name that gives you a nice stereotype to make dismissing an opposing viewpoint out of hand more palatable. But please, enlighten me about how antimask people are the only ones politicizing public health measures
     
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  9. VitisVinifera

    VitisVinifera Initiate (157) Feb 25, 2013 California

    One new development I'm just starting to see here in Northern California: every county is individually rated on a tier system, and some counties are getting quite a bit further ahead than others. So my county, San Joaquin, is in the worst tier, purple, and will for at least 2 more weeks. Another nearby county, Yolo, is at orange now, and they have some pretty good breweries - the ones in Davis and West Sacramento. Guess where my beer money is moving?
     
    unlikelyspiderperson likes this.
  10. HouseofWortship

    HouseofWortship Meyvn (1,366) May 3, 2016 Illinois
    Society Trader

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