I'm Jamil Zainasheff, owner/brewer of Heretic Brewing Co. Ask me anything.

Discussion in 'Ask Me Anything' started by jzainasheff, Jul 18, 2020.

  1. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (4,688) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
    Society

    I suspect that nobody knows what defines "correct math" here. It is akin to conducting an environmental impact assessment. How 'far back' do you need to go in your assessment? How many factors do you need to consider to be 'complete'?

    And one aspect that most folks do not consider is what assumptions (many which folks do implicitly - without really thinking about it) are made as part of the assessment? Are they 'valid' assumptions?

    Let's consider the case of Brewdog where they are claiming they are (or will be) carbon negative. There is no universally accepted way to confirm this really happens. How much CO2 is actually being consumed by the forest they are buying/developing? They best you could do here is some analysis of amount of CO2 consumed per acre (which may be accurate or not) and multiply by the number of acres. How much CO2 does Brewdog actually create by all f their business operations (e.g., brewing operations, distribution operations, etc.)? Again you could do some analysis, with assumptions, which may be accurate or not.

    I suppose folks will mostly decide to do things because they think it is a step in the right direction?

    Cheers!
     
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  2. jzainasheff

    jzainasheff Initiate (58) Apr 8, 2017 California
    Brewery

    Part of the problem is when you build a brewery, you set it up with a delivered CO2 supply. In our case, the recovery equipment couldn't work at the pressures of the delivered CO2 and the recovered CO2 needed its own tank. We would have to set up a second whole CO2 system, maybe just for the tap room. We couldn't tie it into our CO2 tank and distribution system that has been built over the years. Trying to use multiple systems into one distribution would be problematic. I'm guessing my friend found that these systems won't produce enough CO2 for all of his needs, so it was best to sell off what was recovered and use the very reliable normal tank and delivery system for brewing.

    In the end, it doesn't matter if you use the CO2 or someone else uses it. Same amount of CO2 was used.
     
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  3. jzainasheff

    jzainasheff Initiate (58) Apr 8, 2017 California
    Brewery

    Absolutely. I think, like you, that you can't put an exact number on everything, but you can get a general idea if you are moving in the right direction or not. Over time the precision probably improves, but you still deal with things like how wet or dry a winter it was, how much sun hit the trees, etc.

    In the end, the precision doesn't matter much, but the effort put forward to be a good member of the community is what matters.
     
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  4. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (4,688) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
    Society

    Yeah, could be a compatibility issue for your friend.

    As an old boss of mine enjoyed saying: the devil is in the details.

    Cheers!
     
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  5. hopfenunmaltz

    hopfenunmaltz Poo-Bah (1,831) Jun 8, 2005 Michigan
    Society

    Your results are one datum. You mention Scott Janish to whose blog I read, and he had a post advocating cold dry hopping.

    Next time I dry hop I can split a batch and do one cold, one warm and see what I prefer.
     
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  6. jzainasheff

    jzainasheff Initiate (58) Apr 8, 2017 California
    Brewery

    Yes, absolutely, which is why we need more people to give it a try. I'm just saying that under the conditions listed, it did not give the expected results at my brewery. There are a huge number of variables, so we need to take any statement that it works or not with that in mind.

    I'm going to try again a little warmer. I will post the results.

    If you aren't tired of reading about dry hopping, this is a nice read:

    https://bsgcraftbrewing.com/reevaluating-dry-hop-techniques
     
  7. TeeCee

    TeeCee Aspirant (282) Oct 14, 2007 Louisiana

    Hey Jamil, I have a question about water adjustments for dark beers such as RIS and Black DIPA in order to hit an acceptable mash pH.

    Previously, I used carbon filtered tap water, campden tablet added and allowed to sit warm ( >160°F) over night, acidified usually to ~5.4 pH as my hot liquor. As I move to using RO, I don't inherently have the bicarbonates to stabilize the mash pH. I don't usually add bicarbonates for the sake of adding them as I brew a lot of pale beer. I use mainly gypsum, calcium chloride, and epsom salt (when trying to keep the calcium levels down).

    Should I just do the math to add enough baking soda to get to my Lamotte kit tested bicarbonates levels?

    I've read that calcium carbonate does not dissolve well and shouldn't be used. Do you agree?

    It appears that Bru'n water allows for the use of pickling lime, but friends have anecdotally noticed a strange bitterness in beers such as RIS and Baltic Porter where pickling lime was used (but not in a wee heavy which also used pickling lime). It may come down to a double dose of bicarbonates in the case of the first two beers as they actually added picking lime on top of filtered tap vs. the wee heavy that started with RO. Thoughts?

    What's the lowest pH in the mash we should accept?

    Thanks!
     
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  8. unlikelyspiderperson

    unlikelyspiderperson Poo-Bah (1,558) Mar 12, 2013 California
    Society Trader

    Well I've just finished my first pack of fresh hop.beer for the year (hoping I'll see .more but there's not usually a lot of packaged options around here so who knows) and I'd be curious to hear your take on and/or experience with using fresh hops.

    I get that there are logistical hurdles, but there is a disappointing shortage of fresh hop brews from CA brewers
     
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  9. jzainasheff

    jzainasheff Initiate (58) Apr 8, 2017 California
    Brewery

    OK, a bunch of questions in one. Yes, you can add baking soda. At Heretic we use calcium carbonate. It won't dissolve well in water generally, but if you add it to an acidic mash, it will get broken down and dissolved. Try a batch with just scattering the chalk into the mash as you dough in and mix it. It should dissolve.

    Yes, the problem was probably too much calcium hydroxide. I think letting your pallet tell you if a water adjustment is good or not is the way to go. There are a lot of ways to adjust water and some people prefer one way over another, so there is no hard and fast "you must do it this way" kind of rules.

    The mash will convert at a fairly wide range of pH. Generally, keep it 5.2 and above if you can. If it ends up 5.0, I wouldn't toss the wort, but I would try to make an adjustment the next time I brewed.
     
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  10. jzainasheff

    jzainasheff Initiate (58) Apr 8, 2017 California
    Brewery

    Ah yes. There are a few things that make a wet and fresh hop beers a little more problematic. I'm a little old school, where wet and fresh hops are two entirely different things, but people often use the two terms interchangeably these days.

    My definition of wet hop is using hops that haven't been dried. They are picked, sent to the brewery, and brewed within 24 - 48 hours of picking. You get a green, leafy, character. Some people hate wet hop beers for this reason. You can't wait more than the 48 hours and need to keep them refrigerated or they break down into a slimy mess quickly.

    Fresh hops on the other hand (defined by beers like Sierra Nevada Celebration Ale) are beers using the first hops of the season. These are processed like normal, but this new crop of hops is considered "fresh" and special (I guess the hops after that point are not fresh anymore, just hops). Generally, this is something that only breweries using whole cones mention. I suppose you can do it with pellets too, but pellets lose less character over the course of the year, so the difference between "fresh" pellet hops and properly stored pellets later in the year is not as great as it is with whole cone at the beginning and end of the hop year.

    Why don't we see more wet hop beers? If your brewery is close to a quality hop farm, then you don't have to do fedex overnight to get the hops, which can cost a lot. Most breweries are no where near a hop farm. Add to that the cost of the hops. Generally the hop farms want the same price per pound as for dried hops. But... these hops weigh seven times more than dried hops, so you are paying a 7x price. Then, often the varieties offered are limited. You get a choice of one or two different hops. And the timing means you need to have a free spot in your brew schedule and an empty tank sitting there waiting. Usually they can give you a general range of when they might harvest, but it can vary considerably based on environmental factors and labor availability. When harvest happens, it happens for everyone pretty fast and labor is limited.

    We were offered some cascade hops this year from a local farm, but it wasn't enough for us to do a proper sized batch, so we skipped it. Maybe next year or maybe if we get a little pilot plant.

    Why not more fresh hop beers? I think there are lots of them naturally occurring, but generally, nobody bothers saying anything about it for the reasons I mention above.
     
  11. jgould

    jgould Initiate (100) Oct 6, 2009 Texas

    Lately, I've been discussing with some other people on this thread about the viability of dry yeast pitched directly into wort. I've read several sources that say that you lose about 50% of your yeast due to temperature of the wort or osmotic pressure during re-hydration. I have heard you speak on the matter, but it's been a while and I'm a big foggy (read inebriated) at the moment and wanted to get your take on it. Have you tested (or experienced) an issue with pitching dry yeast directly into wort? Do you have any recommendations on the subject?
     
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  12. TeeCee

    TeeCee Aspirant (282) Oct 14, 2007 Louisiana

    That's news that I can use. I think I will try half and half baking soda and chalk in the mash. Thanks!
     
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  13. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (4,688) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
    Society

    Do you subscribe to BYO magazine? There was an article that addressed this topic in the September 2019 issue. Fermentis conducted a lot of scientific experimentation on this topic in cooperation with Institut Meurice and Odisee University.

    Cheers!
     
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  14. jzainasheff

    jzainasheff Initiate (58) Apr 8, 2017 California
    Brewery

    This is an interesting question. The guidance from the dry yeast manufacturers has changed over the years. Back in the day, the people making dry yeast actually said that you can lose 50% of the yeast to not re-hydrating properly, and you needed to rehydrate. I think it was Dr. Clayton Cone (I could be wrong) from whom I learned this. I did try to quantify this for various dry yeasts when I made the first yeast calculator, but it was difficult to get an exact number. At that time it was hard to get fresh dry yeast packs and the difference in results between different strains and brands was substantial. I saw 50% and I saw 20% reductions in viable yeast. Nothing better than 20% though. My thinking then, and now, is that for safety you need to re-hydrate every time, as it never seemed to hurt when done properly.

    Eventually there was an interesting shift in the information the dry yeast manufacturers put on their websites. They had one section for professional brewers that said to re-hydrate your yeast and then they had another section for homebrewers that said you should just sprinkle it on the surface of your wort. I admit, that kind of pissed me off as a homebrewer, as it essentially said my beer wasn't as important and was not expected to be as good as someone who was selling their beer. I thought that was insulting to homebrewers and clearly I'm still not over it. :rolling_eyes::grin:

    Well, later they started saying that re-hydration wasn't needed at all, that the yeast were fine without it and you could do more harm than good if you re-hydrated wrong. Clearly, they want their product to be seen as easy to use, not requiring extra steps. I get that and I do think if you toss in enough, it certainly does work. And I do think they have made a lot of progress on how dry yeast is manufactured. I think they have tweaked the processes, resulting in better energy reserves for the yeast, increased viability, and most likely improvements in yeast handling re-hydration in wort. I don't think they are just making that stuff up. So the question is, do you still need to re-hydrate? I think it depends on your situation. I think with an average strength wort and a fresh, properly sized pack of dry yeast, you are probably good to go. If you are making a high gravity beer, then you might want to consider re-hydrating first. If you want the best possible outcome, then there are yeast re-hydration aids, that can help get close to 100% viable yeast. Generally, without them, I saw about 95-98% success with just water and fresh yeast. Of course, that was back in the day and I haven't tested the latest dry yeasts, so numbers might have changed.

    There was one other thing I've heard suggested, that re-hydrating yeast first somehow used up the yeast glycogen reserves and hurt fermentation. I do not think that is really possible in the 15 minutes it takes for re-hydration, especially in water. The claim that this happens when making a starter with dry yeast has some potential to be true, but I think it depends on your goal and how you are making the starter.

    In general, proper handling of yeast is always important. Keep an eye out for the health of the yeast and they will make better beer.
     
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  15. jzainasheff

    jzainasheff Initiate (58) Apr 8, 2017 California
    Brewery

    Let us know what results you get. I'm sure everyone would be interested.
     
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  16. jzainasheff

    jzainasheff Initiate (58) Apr 8, 2017 California
    Brewery

    So a little further information on cold dry hopping, now that the beer is packaged and has rested for a bit. Compared in a blind triangle, the cold dry hopping is easy to detect. It has a strong lemon/lemonade aroma and flavor as compared to the warm dry hopped. The cold dry hop also has vastly superior head retention. Not that the other beers were lacking in head retention, but the head on the cold dry hop beer was pretty much set in stone. You could drink the beer and leave the head in place if you used a straw. Going to try a temp 10F warmer and see what happens.
     
  17. jzainasheff

    jzainasheff Initiate (58) Apr 8, 2017 California
    Brewery

    BYO very kindly sends me their fine magazine. I fell behind with having so many business challenges lately, so I haven't read that article. I will have to dig it out and read it.
     
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  18. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (4,688) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
    Society

    I would encourage you to do so.

    As you discussed in your above post:
    When you read that article there is even a bit of

    [​IMG]
     
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  19. TeeCee

    TeeCee Aspirant (282) Oct 14, 2007 Louisiana

    Hmm. That make's me think that certain Belgian beers may be dry hopped cold....
     
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  20. TeeCee

    TeeCee Aspirant (282) Oct 14, 2007 Louisiana

    This explanation for dank is interesting in that so many Aussie and Kiwi hops are dank. It would not be surprising to me to find out that their methods differed in these details you mention vs. typical US hop growers.
     
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  21. jzainasheff

    jzainasheff Initiate (58) Apr 8, 2017 California
    Brewery

    An interesting theory, but a lot of the Belgian beers with a thick, rocky, lasting head are not dry hopped at all I think.

    In the beer I was referring to, there were two differences in the process. One was dry hopping cold, the other was dropping the beer temperature a few days earlier than usual, because we were cold dry hopping. I do think it was because of the cold dry hop and not the earlier dropping of the temperature, but just to be thorough I thought I should mention it.
     
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  22. jzainasheff

    jzainasheff Initiate (58) Apr 8, 2017 California
    Brewery

    I was doing a hop selection one year where they had cuts from farms only a couple miles apart. There was a huge difference in that dank character between farms. When I asked, they told me that the farm where it was more dank believed in a different timing on hop picking.

    I think when it comes to commercial hops, you choose what you like. You can comment on your preference, but the growers do what they think the market wants. It is key though in growing your own hops. I have been told that when the time for picking gets close, you want to check them at least once or twice a day. It takes only a very short amount of time to go from wonderful to onion.
     
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  23. TeeCee

    TeeCee Aspirant (282) Oct 14, 2007 Louisiana

    Hwey Jamil, I'd like some more thoughts on NEIPA's if you don't mind. We typically use a yeast that is less attenuative. We say that it leaves the beer more malty. We use water profiles that lend themselves towards malty rather than hoppy. All in an effort to make a super hop flavor and aroma beer.

    Are we just simplifying the terminology used, defying the odds with toms of hops, something else? Is hoppy as used typically referring to bittering more so than flavor and aroma? Maybe the answer here is far shorter than the question.... lol
     
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  24. jzainasheff

    jzainasheff Initiate (58) Apr 8, 2017 California
    Brewery

    I am very picky about the word "malty" as it relates to beer. Many people use malty to mean sweet or full while others use it to refer to malt character or flavors. For example, the characteristic bready, toasty, etc flavors derived from malt.

    The same can be said for the word "hoppy." I prefer to use the term bitter for a hop bitter beer and not hoppy. I prefer to use the term hoppy when there is an abundance of hop flavor and character.

    So, in terms of NEIPA, yes and no. I'm not sure we are going for malt flavor, but perhaps some sweetness and fullness. Personally, I would not say we are going for a more malty beer, just a sweeter, fuller impression than compared to a west coast ipa. Not as malty or sweet as a dopplebock of course.

    The water, as you mention, lends to that sweet fullness too and by nature all of those things are counter to hop character, flavor, and bitterness. The more residual sugar/dextrines and the more malt flavor present, the greater it suppresses the hop character. There is some evidence that the haze itself does hold some hop compounds that are normally lost in a clear beer, and it adds to the hop flavor/bitterness. So there is some reason for the haze other than just looks.

    However, the question I think you are asking is that in our desire to make a sweeter, fuller beer in a NEIPA are we negatively impacting hop flavor, aroma, and bitterness? Which, yes, I agree is the case. Using the same amount of hopping in a west coast ipa (water, grist, yeast) ends up in a much more intense hop bomb. The beer itself has little to hide the hop character or bitterness.

    But, I think the overall desire in the NEIPA is not to be the hoppiest beer out there, but to focus on a different side of hoppiness, to get that juicy, sweeter, softer profile that the majority of current craft beer drinkers seem to love more than a crisp, bitting, west coast style. Both are great beers. It just depends on your preference.
     
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  25. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (4,688) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
    Society

    FWIW that is what I am 'targeting' for the non-juicy clone of Weldwerks Juicy Bits I am fermenting right now. Maybe I should brand this batch as Hoppy Bits!?!:thinking_face:

    Cheers!
     
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  26. jzainasheff

    jzainasheff Initiate (58) Apr 8, 2017 California
    Brewery

    Yes, I think it will be a much different hop character overall, because of the changes to the haze/juicy character. I'm certainly a fan of both WC and NE IPA, so I don't see how you can go wrong. :slight_smile:
     
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  27. heymikew

    heymikew Savant (979) Mar 18, 2011 California
    Society

    Here's a question from the distribution side.
    I'm helping my best friend with his new taproom opening soon. He purchased a small failed eating establishment at the end of last year to turn it in to a taproom, went through hell with the city to get permits and then covid hit and he got laid off from the job he was using to pay the rent on the commercial space. Despite all this he's still optimistic. It's less than 30 miles from your brewery.

    I want to help him curate a high quality, varied lineup that will give a good first impression to his future customers. The planned focus is a "showcase" of some of the better Bay Area/North Bay micros

    How do we get other than tiny brewers to pay attention to us, when we are just starting out and establishing a customer base, especially when we will be very low volume initially?
     
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  28. jzainasheff

    jzainasheff Initiate (58) Apr 8, 2017 California
    Brewery

    When you say "pay attention to us," what is it you mean? There are rules in California that determine what a brewer or wholesaler can do for a retailer. We're prevented from giving anything of value to a retailer. The retailer must pay for everything except coasters and line cleaning of the lines with our beer on it. And then everyone pays the same price, which has to be posted with the state. So there is a limit on what can be done.

    What can be done? A brewery or distributor can send someone by to say hi, tell you about the brewery, and sample you in person on the beers. They can tell you about new beers coming out. If you set up something like a tap takeover then the folks from the brewery can attend as an educational event.

    What can you do? If the breweries you are referring to are with a distributor, then you need to go through the distributor to order the beer. You should set up accounts with all of the local distributors, as that is how the majority of beer is sold. Even if it isn't listed in the distributor's book, they should be able to get you other beers from the breweries they represent. It might be harder to do, but it is certainly possible.

    The distributors are used to working with new places and usually will try to be the first one in there to set up a relationship. Ideally, they want all your tap handles to be their beer. The more of their beers you have on, the more attention you will get from them. But if you tie up all of your handles with one distributor, you limit the number of breweries you can get beer from. If it is an individual brewery, this is more difficult, because you are probably only offering them one or two tap handles. That is great, but not enough to keep a brewery in business. So you will have to work with distributors at some point. That isn't a bad thing either, because getting random deliveries and cutting dozens of checks eats into your time available to do other things. Being able to order 15 beers from one source and cut a check once a month may not seem significant, but it really is when you are running around trying to do everything else to keep a business going.

    One thing we have seen is new retailers stopping by the brewery. They go around and introduce themselves, explain what they are doing, and they get a chance to taste all of the beers and see what they might like. When people come to sample you, they generally just bring a couple of beers. Stopping by yourself is certainly appreciated and a good way to kick off a relationship. Again, there is so many limits placed on what can be done. Can you be more specific in what you want to have happen?
     
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  29. heymikew

    heymikew Savant (979) Mar 18, 2011 California
    Society

    Wow, you must be pestered a lot by people looking for freebies!
    We aren't looking for handouts or charity. And yes we are working with a distributor (one of yours) who will provide many of the products we want. But the distributors serving our area only carry a minority of the local/regional brands we would like to carry. It's reaching out to those mostly self-distributed brewers that has been occasionally frustrating (no response to emails or calls), particularly in this time of closures. I appreciate the suggestion of visiting a brewery to meet a brewer and identify products we would like to carry. Building such personal relationships is always the best way to conduct business. Thanks
     
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  30. jzainasheff

    jzainasheff Initiate (58) Apr 8, 2017 California
    Brewery

    Actually we don't get asked for free stuff very often, but I need to explain it for those reading that aren't aware of how it works. Most states have very similar laws.

    It is only a few places that either are trying to get around the law or don't know the law. There are a few breweries that participate in that illegal activity too. I think the places that ask for free stuff tend to be pretty poor places to drink. Often they take the discounted or free stuff because they are worried more about price than quality, which is stuff that nobody wants to drink, which is why they are giving it away.

    It sounds like you are on the right path though. Certainly, if you are interested in tasting through the Heretic line up, just let me know and I can arrange it. Email me info at hereticbrewing and we can see what we can do to help. Maybe let me know what breweries you are having trouble reaching and I can give them a nudge if I know them.

    In the end, it is quite an effort to make a great craft beer bar happen. It will get easier once you are started, but the struggle will be worth it. Cheers to you for caring so much about what is being served.
     
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  31. TeeCee

    TeeCee Aspirant (282) Oct 14, 2007 Louisiana

    Hey (again) Jamil,

    I'm trying to get that vinous quality you can get in an RIS. My last RIS was tasty, but too chocolaty IMO and never hit the vinous stage. I was wondering if that is process/technique, age, certain malts at certain percents, or likely something entirely different. Do you know what I'm referring to and if so, do you have any thoughts on it? I've not brewed the exact Brewing Classic Styles recipe, so I can look at maybe the specific malts I used vs. other options in the same range. I do see Special B from 120 to 180, and am wondering if that's a key ingredient in achieving the vinous quality.

    Thanks!
     
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  32. jzainasheff

    jzainasheff Initiate (58) Apr 8, 2017 California
    Brewery

    Well, not brewing the BCS recipe, there's your problem. :grin: Just kidding, but yes, there are a number of factors in getting that kind of wine like note in an RIS and malts are one of them. I like to add some higher color crystal malts. Some have a bit of a raisin character, which lends to the impression of grapes/wine. Taste the crystal malts and you will see what I mean.

    Probably the biggest factor is going to be the yeast selected, the fermentation parameters, and the type of alcohols made. Some alcohols have more of a vinous character. Some alcohols will become fruity esters and add to the overall fruity, wine thing. It depends on what you are shooting for intensity wise, but regardless of the yeast, you might want to pitch a little on the lower side. Enough to fully attenuate the beer (left over malt will dampen the vinous character) but not so much that you get a super clean result. A little stress is fine. Warmer temperature and a second dose of oxygen about 8 - 12 hours after pitching will help too.

    And then there is aging. Aging seems to let some of those fruity characters emerge and lets the roast settle down.

    I hope that helps.
     
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  33. mike22ne

    mike22ne Defender (613) Aug 5, 2014 Massachusetts

    Jamil, I love that rejection of the "rules" - just do what works to get the beer how you like it!

    I'm sure there is more flexibility in homebrewing than when working with commercial considerations. Are there things you can now do as a pro brewer that you have been unable to as a homebrewer that you wish could be replicated?
     
  34. jzainasheff

    jzainasheff Initiate (58) Apr 8, 2017 California
    Brewery

    I've never thought of it that way. I've always just pined for the ease and flexibility of homebrewing. Let me think.

    Having a bunch of people that I can have clean fermenters, shovel spent grain, package the beer would all be top of my list in homebrewing. :grin:

    But more seriously, it would be things like cheaper hops, being able to do hop selection, access to a serious lab (multiple HLP and PCR checks for every batch). PPB DO meters. Technically, money is all that stops you from doing this as a homebrewer (even the hops thing if you are buying at least 3000# of a single hop). But who has that kind of money to spend on a hobby? And a spouse that is that understanding. I think normally you need to trick your spouse into thinking that opening a commercial brewery is an actual business and not just your chance to buy all the toys that you can say are needed for brewing. There are a lot of cool toys.

    But in the actual brewing of beer, I cannot think of a single thing in commercial brewing that I would miss as a homebrewer. Everything can either be done easier on a small scale or the results of some process can be replicated through another method.

    Really, when homebrewing, it is possible to produce the best beer in the world. It isn't easy or simple to hit that level (most people's homebrew is just OK), but you can do everything and more than a commercial brewer. Never let anyone tell you your beer is inferior because it was brewed at home. That is a load of BS. That is commercial brewers being jealous of the freedom you have.
     
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  35. HazyMeetingOfDa_5Families

    HazyMeetingOfDa_5Families Initiate (53) Aug 20, 2020 Florida

    Love seeing your beer at the best gas station in Miami
    West Dade Chevron

    [​IMG]
     
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  36. TeeCee

    TeeCee Aspirant (282) Oct 14, 2007 Louisiana

    Hey Jamil, I've recently heard talk of using thickening agents in beer. Unfortunately, it has come up as chunks of stuff coming out of cans that don't look like they should be there.

    Is this something your familiar with and if so, what are typical thickeners and what are your thoughts on this?
     
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