Dismiss Notice
Love Belgian Beer?

Join us Sep 17 in Portland, Maine for Return of the Belgian Beer Fest, featuring hundreds of authentic Belgian beers and Belgian-inspired offerings.

Tickets + more: beeradvocate.com/belgian

"IRA" - India Red Ale Recipe Critique

Discussion in 'Homebrewing' started by MaxSpang, Aug 6, 2012.

  1. MaxSpang

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2011
    Posts:
    1,174
    Likes Received:
    1,312
    Location:
    Ohio
    So I'm working on a recipe for an "India Red Ale". It's out of any style, and I haven't seen too many commercial examples of "IRAs". Basically, I want a red ale that has a nice malt backbone while being over-the-top hoppy because 'Merican beers gotta be hoppy! This is kinda based on what is available at my LHBS (sadly, none of my precious Amarillo hops :(). I chose the yeast because it doesn't attenuate as much as, say, WLP001 or other American strains so it'll leave some nice maltiness. I also swapped out some of the American 2-row for Maris Otter to get some more malt flavor in there. I didn't be stingy with the hops.

    I'm open to any feedback. I'm fairly sure that whatever I end up with will be delicious, but any help is appreciated!


    Rifles of the IRA
    14-B American IPA

    Size: 5.0 gal
    Efficiency: 75.0%
    Attenuation: 70.0%
    Calories: 272.55 kcal per 12.0 fl oz

    Original Gravity: 1.081 (1.056 - 1.075)
    Terminal Gravity: 1.024 (1.010 - 1.018)
    Color: 18.12 (6.0 - 15.0)
    Alcohol: 7.47% (5.5% - 7.5%)
    Bitterness: 82.0 (40.0 - 70.0)

    Ingredients:
    9.0 lb American 2-row
    5.0 lb Maris Otter
    1.0 lb Crystal 60
    0.5 lb Munich Malt
    2 oz Roasted Barley
    .75 oz Columbus (15.0%) - added first wort, boiled 60 m
    0.5 oz Cascade (5.5%) - added during boil, boiled 10.0 m
    0.5 oz Citra™ (12.0%) - added during boil, boiled 10.0 m
    0.5 oz Chinook (13.0%) - added during boil, boiled 10.0 m
    .25 oz Columbus (15.0%) - added during boil, boiled 10.0 m
    0.5 oz Cascade (5.5%) - added during boil, boiled 5.0 m
    0.5 oz Citra™ (12.0%) - added during boil, boiled 5.0 m
    0.5 oz Chinook (13.0%) - added during boil, boiled 5.0 m
    1.0 oz Cascade (5.5%) - added during boil, boiled 0.0 m
    1.0 oz Citra™ (12.0%) - added during boil, boiled 0.0 m
    1.0 oz Chinook (13.0%) - added during boil, boiled 0.0 m
    1.0 oz Cascade (5.5%) - added dry to secondary fermenter
    1.0 oz Citra™ (12.0%) - added dry to secondary fermenter
    1.0 oz Chinook (13.0%) - added dry to secondary fermenter
    1.0 ea White Labs WLP013 London Ale
     
  2. jbakajust1

    jbakajust1 Moderator
    Staff Member Subscriber

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2009
    Posts:
    3,790
    Likes Received:
    4,172
    Location:
    Oregon
    Looks good to me, except I'd either drop the FG with a sub of sugar, or up the bitterness. I did a 1.082 OG DIPA that finished out @ 1.014 that still has tons of maltiness.
     
  3. AlCaponeJunior

    Joined:
    May 21, 2010
    Posts:
    3,371
    Likes Received:
    1,448
    Location:
    Texas
    looks damn tasty to me. what about this recipe is making the FG finish so high? I'm just asking in light of jbaka's comment, not that I have any especially great insight on the matter.
     
  4. MaxSpang

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2011
    Posts:
    1,174
    Likes Received:
    1,312
    Location:
    Ohio
    Whoa, I didn't even notice the FG! I'm assuming it's that high because I put the attenuation at 70% rather than 75%. I think I'm going to mash it at around 150, and I might add in a pound or so of corn sugar to dry it out a bit
     
  5. mnstorm99

    Joined:
    May 11, 2007
    Posts:
    1,782
    Likes Received:
    802
    Location:
    Minnesota
    I bet with that yeast, less than 10% specialty malt combined with a 150° mash temp, 75% would be the lowest apparent attenuation you would get. Obviously there are other factors, but I don't think I would add sugar for this beer.
     
  6. MaxSpang

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2011
    Posts:
    1,174
    Likes Received:
    1,312
    Location:
    Ohio
    I can dig this. I'm not too familiar with WLP013, I've generally used WLP001 for the majority of my beers, but what you said makes sense. I still might add some more hops to get the IBUs up. Ya know, just in case.
     
  7. carteravebrew

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2010
    Posts:
    881
    Likes Received:
    1,237
    Location:
    Colorado
    You may already know this but if you're looking to dry out, adding sugar won't do it. You have to sub some of your base malt with sugar. Just adding sugar will just bump the alcohol - you have to actually replace some of your "very fermentables" with "completely fermentables." Just wanted to clear that up.
     
  8. MaxSpang

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2011
    Posts:
    1,174
    Likes Received:
    1,312
    Location:
    Ohio
    Yep, you are absolutely right. I actually meant I was going to sub a pound of sugar for malt, not just add a pound of sugar in there (even though that's exactly what I said, haha). Thanks for the clarification!
     
  9. telejunkie

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2007
    Posts:
    1,509
    Likes Received:
    789
    Location:
    Vermont
    1# 60L in this recipe seems a little excessive and possible provide too much caramel/toffee flavor for the hop forward aspect you're going for. I might drop this some to maybe .5# and compensate by adding a little more RB for color loss and a maybe .5# lower degree crystal malt like 10L. Just my 2cents
     
  10. mnstorm99

    Joined:
    May 11, 2007
    Posts:
    1,782
    Likes Received:
    802
    Location:
    Minnesota
    I guess when I see "red ale" anything, I assume more of a malt profile and a touch of the carmel seems to fit (in my mind). Also, this is only 6.5% of the malt bill.
     
  11. telejunkie

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2007
    Posts:
    1,509
    Likes Received:
    789
    Location:
    Vermont
    yeah, to me it would definitely have it's place in a more malt forward red/amber ale, but if looking to balance the malt and still get a blast of hops, i would chop it back some. There should be plenty of malt character from the base malts listed. Adding the 1# definitely won't ruin the beer, but in the tug of war between malts & hops, it seems to be going against where the brewer wants to be really be going.
     
  12. mnstorm99

    Joined:
    May 11, 2007
    Posts:
    1,782
    Likes Received:
    802
    Location:
    Minnesota
    Good point on the base malt being used, not sure why I didn't consider the 5# of MO :rolleyes:
     
  13. MaxSpang

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2011
    Posts:
    1,174
    Likes Received:
    1,312
    Location:
    Ohio
    Makes sense, not a bad idea. I might cut back a bit on the crystal 60l and add a little 10 or 20l as well as another ounce or so of toasted barley to make up for the color.
     
  • About Us

    Your go-to website for beer (since 1996), publishers of BeerAdvocate magazine (since 2006) and hosts of world-class beer events (since 2003). Respect Beer.
  • Quick Navigation

    Open the Quick Navigation

  • Return of the Belgian Beer Fest

    BeerAdvocate Brings its All-Belgian Fest to Portland, Maine on September 17, 2016. Tickets are on sale now.

    Learn More
  • Get the Mag

    Become a BeerAdvocate magazine print subscriber today.

    Subscribe