Is it expensive to make beer have taste?

Discussion in 'Beer Talk' started by beerPOS, Feb 26, 2014.

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  1. Johnny_Muir

    Johnny_Muir Initiate (0) Jan 8, 2014 New Jersey

    If by "want" you mean "widest distribution range combined with dumbed down advertising that says "drink me and I'll get you laid"", then sure, people want that shit.
     
  2. Rekrule

    Rekrule Defender (604) Nov 11, 2011 Massachusetts

    Do you really know the majority of Americans to crave foods or beverages that really challenge their palates? Look at the brands that sell the most. A general blandness is what those brands will have in common. You are living in la la land and want your proximity bias explain away the majority's preferences "wrong". It doesn't.
     
  3. hopfenunmaltz

    hopfenunmaltz Poo-Bah (1,834) Jun 8, 2005 Michigan
    Society

    Oils do not equal bitterness, but the general perception of bitterness can be enhanced by hoppy aroma and flavor. Water chemistry, residual sugars, and many other things influence the perception of bitterness.

    Alpha Acids are responsible for the IBUs when isomorized.
     
  4. hopfenunmaltz

    hopfenunmaltz Poo-Bah (1,834) Jun 8, 2005 Michigan
    Society

    Have you ever had the award winning DRIPA from Kuhnhenn? That stands for double RICE IPA!
     
  5. awinkro

    awinkro Initiate (163) Oct 15, 2008 Texas

    Macro breweries, like ABInbev and MillerCoors use ingredients that are much cheaper than craft breweries, specifically rice and corn. These cost considerably less than barley, wheat, rye, and oats. Craft brewers also use quite a bit of caramel/crystal malts which cost more than base malts. Macro breweries use very little and most of the time, zero caramel/crystal malts keeping cost down. Hence another reason for mark up.
     
  6. jRocco2021

    jRocco2021 Disciple (311) Mar 13, 2010 Wisconsin
    Trader

    Its funny I always thought putting brewing measurements like OG, FG, IBU etc was lame marketing. It usually means nothing to the end drinker except for when its a ridiculous extreme like palate wrecker at 140 some odd IBU's. All you will ever need to know about any given beer as a consumer is who made it, what style/ingredients are in it, the ABV, and the bottle date.
     
  7. offthelevel_bytheplumb

    offthelevel_bytheplumb Devotee (410) Aug 19, 2013 Illinois

    So because Kuhnhenn dry hops a brew with 80 lbs of 4 different types of hops, the use of adjuncts in Budweiser does not tone down the intensity of the flavor. Solid argument.
     
  8. hopfenunmaltz

    hopfenunmaltz Poo-Bah (1,834) Jun 8, 2005 Michigan
    Society

    But they cut the cost of making the beer by using adjuncts! :sunglasses:
     
  9. offthelevel_bytheplumb

    offthelevel_bytheplumb Devotee (410) Aug 19, 2013 Illinois

    Not sure what exactly the tone of your voice is right now, or what your point is.
     
  10. hopfenunmaltz

    hopfenunmaltz Poo-Bah (1,834) Jun 8, 2005 Michigan
    Society

    Adjuncts are not always bad, it depends on how they are used. Too much is not good, some can lighten the body in a big beer.

    Your point was?
    Edit - some adjuncts cost as much as malted barley. Corn is not so cheap these days either.
     
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  11. offthelevel_bytheplumb

    offthelevel_bytheplumb Devotee (410) Aug 19, 2013 Illinois

    I was talking about macro brewers making AALs, not adjuncts and their use in brewing as a whole. All I mentioned in my post is the intensity of the flavors in macro brewed beers, which is the whole purpose of this thread.
     
  12. hopfenunmaltz

    hopfenunmaltz Poo-Bah (1,834) Jun 8, 2005 Michigan
    Society

    It does take skill to brew a beer with minimal flavor. I have never been able to do that.
     
  13. offthelevel_bytheplumb

    offthelevel_bytheplumb Devotee (410) Aug 19, 2013 Illinois

    Damn right. I've even attempted a blonde ale before... oh brother!
     
  14. Patric_Lawrence

    Patric_Lawrence Initiate (0) Feb 1, 2014 Colorado

    100% malted barley beers will cost significantly more to produce than adjunct beers, consisting of corn or rice. Hops are also expensive to add to the kettle. But that is no excuse to drink schwag.
     
  15. marquis

    marquis Champion (817) Nov 20, 2005 England

    Rice is no cheaper than malt. However, it isn't the cost of ingredients which makes up the bulk of the price of beer. It's overheads.The brewing plant and the land it stands on have to be paid for.Brewing requires lots of energy and water regardless of the strength or whether adjuncts are used.Plant needs upkeep and money set aside for replacement.It's operated by workers who like to be paid.Then there is tax , hours spent in getting orders, processing them and getting the money in. Add distribution costs and you start to see why a few extra pounds of malt or hops don't affect the price much.
     
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  16. Providence

    Providence Crusader (712) Feb 24, 2010 Rhode Island

    Most people on these boards drink BMC products.
     
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  17. otispdriftwood

    otispdriftwood Initiate (0) Dec 9, 2011 Colorado

    Say it ain't so!
     
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  18. Providence

    Providence Crusader (712) Feb 24, 2010 Rhode Island

    I wish I could, ha.
     
  19. DarkDragon999

    DarkDragon999 Aspirant (259) Feb 13, 2013 Rhode Island

    Once I started drinking craft I totally expected to completely give up BMC beer but it hasnt happened. There are still times when I just wanna pound cheap beer but at least I get the stuff that tastes tolerable.
     
    utopiajane likes this.
  20. utopiajane

    utopiajane Poo-Bah (2,556) Jun 11, 2013 New York

    I think it's ok have one foot in each camp. I recently just started trying all the BMC beers and some of them are exactly what they claim to be. Light, easy to drink, not too filling and won't knock you down with alcohol.
     
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