Keg Storage?

Discussion in 'Home Bar' started by MiamiBeer, May 11, 2013.

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  1. MiamiBeer

    MiamiBeer Initiate (0) May 11, 2013 Florida

    I have a question I couldn't find an answer for doing a quick search; hope this is the right place. I just purchased a keggerator and couldn't be happier. I also work in the restaurant business so I can order kegs through work at a substantial savings (35% off retail in some cases). My question is this: can I store a keg at room temp without it going bad? It seems to make sense that the integrity of the beer may be compromised going from cold to warm to cold again but am I correct to assume that this probably happens somewhere along the supply chain anyway? I'll most likely be getting an ale or pils. Thanks in advance and happy drinking!
     
  2. billandsuz

    billandsuz Aspirant (299) Sep 1, 2004 New York

    domestic keg beer is not pasteurized in almost all cases and needs to be refrigerated.
    warm to cold to warm does not really have much to do with it.
    yes, keg beer will typically spend some time out of refrigeration, but not so long to be a problem.

    you can not hold a keg of domestic beer, especially the typical light lager (Bud etc) in warm storage. bigger beers have more hops and alcohol which are preservatives, and this will give a little more protection against spoilage. domestic keg beer is not the same as bottle beer. it is packaged differently.

    your co workers will want to argue this point. let them.
    Cheers.
     
    jesskidden likes this.
  3. Timmush

    Timmush Aspirant (290) Jan 5, 2008 New Jersey
    Beer Trader

    I have a keg of Founders Imperial Stout in my cellar that I tap once a year for a month and then return to the cellar. and it is glorious.

    Edit.. Just found this
    Beers that are “bottle-conditioned” are not pasteurized. Many Belgian Ale and U.S craft beers are bottle conditioned. Big Beer (Budweiser, Coors, Miller) pasteurizes beers after bottling to prevent microbes from causing “off” flavors. These microbes, however, do not cause illness. Craft brewers do not typically pasteurize
     
  4. mikehartigan

    mikehartigan Aspirant (292) Apr 9, 2007 Illinois

    Indeed! Virtually all of the big beers I homebrew age at room temperature for, probably, 90% of their life. Either just sitting for a year or two before tapping, or to be served only seasonally, like you do with the Founders. Smaller beers are kept cold until they're gone, though they, too, spend some time at room temp before tapping - maybe a month or so.
    Bottle conditioning requires live yeast, so pasteurization is not possible.
     
  5. MiamiBeer

    MiamiBeer Initiate (0) May 11, 2013 Florida

    Thanks for the info, looks like the short answer is yes, I can hold a keg at room temp. I will definitely not be buying a big beer (Bud etc.). Actually looking at some beers from Due South which is right up the road from me (1 hr drive) because I'd love to do what I can to support an independent brewery. Alas, it looks like I'll have to spend a day sampling beer. The lawn will just have to wait.
     
  6. mikehartigan

    mikehartigan Aspirant (292) Apr 9, 2007 Illinois

    Just to be clear, 'big beer' refers to high gravity/ABV, not a macro brew. An Imperial Stout, for example, is a big beer. A Bud Light is an example of a small beer. I felt it necessary to point that out because, in the context of this discussion, misuse of that term can result in an interpretation that is the exact opposite of what was intended.
     
  7. billandsuz

    billandsuz Aspirant (299) Sep 1, 2004 New York

    the short answer is NO. you can't have your keg at room temperature.

    here, read what industry says....
    http://www.micromatic.com/beer-questions/temperature-store-beer-aid-46.html
    "Temperature is by far the most important issue when it comes to dispensing keg draft beer. Almost all draft beer problems are temperature related.
    Most draft beer brewed in the U.S is not pasteurized, so it must be kept cold. The temperature of non-pasteurized Ale & Lager type beers must be maintained between 36-38°F all the way to the point of dispense. "

    Micromatic is conservative with 38, but 42, 44, too much more you are asking for spoiled kef beer.
    feel free to store your beer at room temperature if you like spoiled beer. your keg of beer is not the same as homebrew and its not a Barley Wine. if it were you wouldn't be here asking questions.
    just keep it cold like your supposed to.
    Cheers.
     
    jesskidden likes this.
  8. DougC123

    DougC123 Devotee (470) Aug 21, 2012 Connecticut
    Subscriber

    Hopefully he wasn't just here for those two posts and comes back so he understands.
     
  9. billandsuz

    billandsuz Aspirant (299) Sep 1, 2004 New York

    nah...
    it is something of a community service. my rule is if the poster appears to have put some effort into the question and not "hey, i want to buy a kegerator. whats the best, dude?" i'll give an honest if dry answer as best as possible. otherwise, ask the moron at home depot who sold you that $500 appliance. you get what you deserve.

    but few if any return to contribute and that is ok. i'm the nerd in the room, i don't expect everyone to be a nerdy as the rest of us.
    Cheers.
     
  10. DougC123

    DougC123 Devotee (470) Aug 21, 2012 Connecticut
    Subscriber

    As long as he doesn't ask us about balance I'm fine.
     
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