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Liquid Nitrogen Pure Hop # IPA

Discussion in 'Homebrewing' started by GarageProject, Sep 18, 2014.

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  1. GarageProject

    GarageProject Initiate (0) Sep 8, 2012 New Zealand (Aotearoa)

    Hi all - thought you might be interested in a new technique we've been playing with lately. We've been brewing with pure lupulin, extracted from whole cone Nelson Sauvin with liquid nitrogen in a hop hash making process. The beer was hopped exclusively with the pure lupulin throughout the boil, and then dry #'d has well.

    Initial results are promising - seems to give the beer a delicate aroma and very smooth bitterness.

    Here's a homage video we made on the process :wink:

     
  2. moonbrews

    moonbrews Initiate (86) Aug 11, 2010 Virginia

    How does this technique affect the cost of hop usage for a typical beer? I assume it adds to it, obviously. Is the difference in the finished product enough to merit the cost?
     
  3. beerdedking

    beerdedking Devotee (401) Oct 15, 2008 Pennsylvania

    This sounds nice, but I'd rather see more Nelson beers in general...
     
    GarageProject likes this.
  4. MisSigsFan

    MisSigsFan Initiate (0) Mar 2, 2013 California

    I'm guessing the biggest benefit is that it will reduce wort loss in highly hopped beers.
     
  5. moonbrews

    moonbrews Initiate (86) Aug 11, 2010 Virginia

    Good point. Another question: noticeably different from using hop extract?
     
  6. IrishTank

    IrishTank Initiate (0) Apr 26, 2014 Kansas

  7. MisSigsFan

    MisSigsFan Initiate (0) Mar 2, 2013 California

    I guess the only way to know would be to try it. I've only used hop extract for bittering. I know it can be used for aroma though. The extract I did use seemed pretty harsh though.
     
  8. VincentFrey

    VincentFrey Initiate (0) Jul 30, 2011 Maryland

    For someone less skilled with extraction techniques, how is this even different than hop extract? I don't mean that negatively, just honestly wondering!
     
  9. GarageProject

    GarageProject Initiate (0) Sep 8, 2012 New Zealand (Aotearoa)

    So far we've really up'ed the amount of leaf we would use for a comparable beer brewed with pellets just to see the effect, and made additions all the way through the boil. For those trials, it's not cost effective (and takes a lot of time!), but shows enough promise that we're working on ways to make the extraction faster, and used in smaller amounts as flame out additions.

    We've only used used hop extract once, and it's not a great beer to compare it with (it was a 100% extract beer - all malt, all hop extract). Using the # certainly free's up more space in the kettle and at a guess, compared to say CO2 extract would have more aroma impact and be more delicate in general (note - that is at a guess!!).
     
  10. GarageProject

    GarageProject Initiate (0) Sep 8, 2012 New Zealand (Aotearoa)

    Hop extracts are almost all supercritical CO2 extracts and come as a goopey oil, so a solvent has been used to make the extraction under pressure and you might get some plant matter or pigment coming through. I guess the main difference is that no solvents have been used, it's refined through mesh filters to collect the pure lupulin and done on site, at time of the brew.
     
    VincentFrey likes this.
  11. VincentFrey

    VincentFrey Initiate (0) Jul 30, 2011 Maryland

    Awesome, thanks for explaining! Hope your final product turns out as intended, and certainly good your first impressions are matching expectation.
     
  12. BumpkinBrewer

    BumpkinBrewer Disciple (314) Jan 6, 2010 Massachusetts

    Is this a Breaking Bad spin off?
    Nice video!
     
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