Method for turning spent grain from beer production into biofuels and plant-based foods developed

Discussion in 'Beer News & Releases' started by Todd, Apr 7, 2021 at 2:42 PM.

  1. Todd

    Todd Founder (6,314) Aug 23, 1996 California
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    Spent grain is typically used to feed cattle or sent to landfills, but two separate projects are exploring techniques that could be used to "produce animal feed, protein for use in human foods, synthetic rubber, materials for creating plastics, and biofuels."

    https://www.sciencefocus.com/news/c...nto-biofuels-and-plant-based-foods-developed/
     
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  2. steveh

    steveh Poo-Bah (2,900) Oct 8, 2003 Illinois
    Society

    Now *that's* innovative!
     
  3. jesskidden

    jesskidden Poo-Bah (2,176) Aug 10, 2005 New Jersey
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    Well... as we've also often seen "new, innovative" beer styles...:wink:
    [​IMG]

    As for making it into an animal feed (as opposed to feeding it directly to cattle or other livestock), Schlitz operated a subsidiary, Murphy Products Co., that sold its own branded feed made from their spent grains- "Brewlage®" and "Maltlage®" - "a mixture of wet brewers grains, maize, minerals and vitamins". Schlitz had Murphy plants in a number of states where they operated breweries (CA, TX, NC, NY, WI) and, strangely, one in Mississippi. Wonder where the wet spent grain came from? Florida, I guess.

    My favorite aspect of the Schlitz feeds, tho', is a quote from a Tennessee dairy farmer about Maltlage in 1980: “It smells better than beer tastes.”

    To which you think, "Well, yeah - better than Schlitz tasted at the time, maybe..."
     
  4. steveh

    steveh Poo-Bah (2,900) Oct 8, 2003 Illinois
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    @jesskidden -- guess I should have been specific to human food and biofuels.

    As a card-carrying old beer fogey like you, I knew about the previous transformations.

    Well, maybe not the gunpowder. :thinking_face:
     
  5. jesskidden

    jesskidden Poo-Bah (2,176) Aug 10, 2005 New Jersey
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    Well, yeah - I knew you knew but sometimes ya gotta do the quote to add more info...

    But, as a WWII and military guy*, here's a question for you:
    Were the Nazi's spent grain-derived explosives better than the US's, you know, what with the Reinheitsgebot and all...

    * Ha. That doesn't read correctly. I didn't want to use the word "fan" or "enthusiast" (never cared for "history buff" either - "Buff, wtf's a buff?") but now it sounds like @steveh might be a veteran of D-Day. Yup. WWII guy. Still drinkin' his beer, tho', pushin' 100 years old.:wink:
     
  6. steveh

    steveh Poo-Bah (2,900) Oct 8, 2003 Illinois
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    Early on, yeah -- it was better. Then, as supply lines broke off and grains were rationed, beer -- and thus its spent grain -- became weaker, so potency lessened. :wink:

    Seriously, I have no clue. :grin:

    And since I'd never even heard of it here...

    Oh, and *historian* works about right. :wink:
     
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  7. cavedave

    cavedave Poo-Bah (3,010) Mar 12, 2009 New York
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    I knew of one local brewer who used to send all his spent grain to a pig farm. He described those pigs as "happiest pigs on earth."

    Glad to see more innovation in using spent grain. It's great when our hobby is part of being good stewards for the planet

    Considering how much spent grain is produced, and how much Americans spend on dog products, I can't understand how someone hasn't successfully mass marketed spent grain dog treats. Every dog I've ever seen offered them loves them, and I think they're healthy for dogs (don't know for sure).
     
  8. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (4,930) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
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    Dave, I don't know about the dogs you may own (have owned" but all of my dogs were basically 'pigs' in that they would eat almost anything.

    I will keep my eyes open while watching Shark Tank to see the first entrepreneurs seeking investment for launching their spent grain doggy treats business - it is only a matter of time. Maybe I will see you there!?! :thinking_face:

    Cheers!
     
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  9. cavedave

    cavedave Poo-Bah (3,010) Mar 12, 2009 New York
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    After Sam died (choc lab) I vowed never to own another dog, that Sam would always stand out in memory. Sam was a better friend than most humans are. She replaced Jed, a black lab, who was my foraging buddy (Sam was too crazy in the woods). Always came with one shout of name and a few slaps to the thigh, no matter how deep into the woods he wandered. Both dogs ate anything, as you say, including, in Sam's case, things that needed veterinary assistance to remove. They did both love spent grain. My friend Ken's dog actually sits by the mash and begs and has been known to go after a dump of grain way too hot.

    Yeah, someone is bound to see the potential for dog treats since spent grain can be had so inexpensively and readily.
     
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  10. unlikelyspiderperson

    unlikelyspiderperson Poo-Bah (1,745) Mar 12, 2013 California
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    I've seen several places making these. I don't spend too much time looking at dog treats or even visiting a pet store but I've seen the spent grain treats at a couple breweries.

    There was also a brewery I visited in grand rapids that served baked goods made with their spent grain
     
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  11. cavedave

    cavedave Poo-Bah (3,010) Mar 12, 2009 New York
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    Here too some breweries make and sell dog treats occasionally, and in my home brew club recipes were exchanged. Dogs love them. Someone will find a way to do it on a large scale and sell em through a Shopping Network, or on line, or at Petco on a national basis, and probably be very successful.
     
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  12. LeRose

    LeRose Poo-Bah (1,535) Nov 24, 2011 Massachusetts
    Society

    Quick comment on the dog treats - they are done on a small scale around here as well. Part of the issue with mass production is the legalities. The hoops you have to jump through for a pet application make human food rules a leisurely stroll in the park by comparison - that could be a barrier keeping some players on the sidelines. We tried it with one of our byproducts - got onto the road a little ways and quickly decided to leave the pet products to those who already have the know how, so we supply to others. Not insurmountable hurdles for someone already in the pet industry, so maybe somebody will take the plunge on a larger scale.
     
  13. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (4,930) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
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    Larry, I would never have guessed that!

    Who regulates the pet food industry (FDA)? Is there a rationale for why pet food products are more stringently regulated?

    Cheers!
     
  14. LeRose

    LeRose Poo-Bah (1,535) Nov 24, 2011 Massachusetts
    Society

    FDA - so it is built upon the people food regulations.

    What I saw was there's a lot more that has to be done around toxicity, handling, and safe consumption including typical use and it is a more stringent proof. I think - and I don't know for sure - it might be because some of the source material can be "iffy" since it's byproducts??? I've gone through only part of the "hey, let's make a pet food" exercise once. Let's put it this way it was more work and money than we were willing to spend (for a very small profit at the end of the day) so we quit on it. When it is the lawyers saying it's too costly (and not the bean counters) - it's probably true!

    It might not be "harder" in the literal sense of the word if it is the industry you work with, but for us it was "more" and to much for us to tackle. I've gone thru the entire GRAS process for a human food (including an expert panel review in Washington) and it is absolutely no joke, but it is regulations we are "used to", if that makes sense.

    So we just sell/barter the byproduct materials that we don't use ourselves and let the companies who play in the different industries go through the required steps.
     
  15. jesskidden

    jesskidden Poo-Bah (2,176) Aug 10, 2005 New Jersey
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    My dog will only eat them if she can dunk them into this.
    [​IMG]

    Because most* dogs can't read and most* dogs will eat anything.
    (* The two different groups do overlap, somewhat).

    Doing any internet research on the use of "brewer's rice" as an adjunct (a real adjunct) in brewing, one will come across probably more references in sources by/about irate dog owners who object to the rice's use in dog food. Always wondered how the folks at Anheuser-Busch felt about that.
    [​IMG]
    Coors, OTOH, has abandoned using dog food ingredients.