News Pete Coors Confused By Craft Beer Growth (pastemagazine.com)

Discussion in 'Beer News & Releases' started by Jason, Jul 21, 2014.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Brolo75

    Brolo75 Poo-Bah (1,537) Aug 10, 2013 California
    Beer Trader

    No, not really. I personally have never been in a position to deny something to a retailer. It's more of a give take relationship, you know let's make a deal. Distributors are reluctant to hold something back our supervisors don't take that kind of behavior lightly. I would say the greatest leverage I have been able to exert is with signage such as neons, posters, etc.
     
    Providence likes this.
  2. Joshmistake

    Joshmistake Aspirant (284) Sep 4, 2012 Minnesota

    Like...if a retailer wants to carry Avery...and you distribute Avery...you might deal and say "we'll give you some Avery but we want an endcap shaped like a football goal post and 2 more shelves to carry our light beer"?
     
  3. Joshmistake

    Joshmistake Aspirant (284) Sep 4, 2012 Minnesota

    I guess I just don't understand the whole "give/take relationship" when it comes to distributing beer. If a customer wants Craft Beer X and doesn't want BMC AAL...what's there to deal on?

    Off Topic...Nice Samuel Smith logo. Love their beer.
     
  4. Providence

    Providence Initiate (0) Feb 24, 2010 Rhode Island

    No I would not.

    Let me be clear, they are both business tactics that are both permitted in a free-market and both are aimed at one thing and one thing alone, making a profit. I have no delusions about any of that. However, in my book, my personal moral sensibilities, these are different actions. One represents a brewery trying to dig out financial stability for themselves, the other is a global company trying to secure a monopoly. Again, "that's business" so I'm not blowing a whistle. However, one I am willing to support and one I am not. It's not as black and white as this, the conversation is much more nuanced (especially if the small craft brewery has been shown to treat workers poorly in some manner), but I'll save that conversation for the day we belly-up to the bar.
     
  5. Providence

    Providence Initiate (0) Feb 24, 2010 Rhode Island

    Good to know, thanks!
     
  6. nc41

    nc41 Meyvn (1,387) Sep 25, 2008 North Carolina
    Beer Trader

    Can't remember the last time I saw a Coors Light tap handle, most are Miller or Bud Light, most have Yuengling. Funny even for the BMC guys their light offering are now their flagship brews, you don't see many Budweiser commercials or Miller, you see Bud Light and Miller Lite, you see the Silver Bullet not Banquet. When I go to the bar here in town a lot of guys are hitting up the craft taps, or pseudo craft like Blue Moon, Guinness and the like, it shows they are reaching for something different. Rare to see a Budweiser bottle on the bar, never a Coors Banquet, I don't think they sell it actually, never a Miller. I do see Corona's, Miller Lites, Bud Lights, guys sharing a pitcher of Yuengling.
     
  7. rgordon

    rgordon Defender (685) Apr 26, 2012 North Carolina

    I saw this happen yesterday. "you can have X amount of "rare" beer if you stack up 40 cases and feature it for two months." I hate this tactic and honestly feel it to be tantamount to commercial blackmail. I always set allocations on a particular account's overall support of the brand to get "some" of the goodies. There were exceptions for particular accounts that did not like the core items of "said" brand, but supported the company strongly. Rare beers and allocations are a pain in the ass. No one is ever happy.
     
  8. nc41

    nc41 Meyvn (1,387) Sep 25, 2008 North Carolina
    Beer Trader

    Some of the sales guys use these tactics to move beer, you want Hopslam? KBS? Then push more Founders the rest of the year, has to be a certain % of sales.Of course the retailer want the KBS and as much as he can get.
     
  9. rlcoffey

    rlcoffey Initiate (0) Apr 20, 2004 Kentucky

    As Pete Coors points out, Coors light is competing in the same market as Stone.

    As are wine and spirits.

    And milk.

    That doesnt make my local dairy craft beer. Although it might be craft milk. :slight_smile:
     
  10. MNAle

    MNAle Crusader (752) Sep 6, 2011 Minnesota

    Well, yes, in the sense that Dennys is competing in the same market as Court of Two Sisters or M&M-Mars is in the same market as Teuscher. You know I wasn't talking about the beverage market in general.
     
  11. bubseymour

    bubseymour Poo-Bah (1,913) Oct 30, 2010 Maryland
    Beer Trader

    I think from a society/psychological standpoint, this also has coorelation to craft boom in last 5+ years. While a large majority of US popolation has seen a decrease in standard of living, more expensive craft beer has increased over BMC. Its probably the most inexpensive way for someone to obtain "the best" of something for minimal impact to the wallet. You may not be able to take the Carribean vacation anymore, have to repair the used car vs. buying a new one etc, but I can still get some of the good life through craft beer. Like a quote I heard a while back. "A cheap bottle of wine costs $3 and the best cost several hundred dollars. The difference between buying the worst and best 6 pack of beers though is roughly $5-10 difference. You can have the best in the world of something by paying $5 more than the worst.
     
  12. rlcoffey

    rlcoffey Initiate (0) Apr 20, 2004 Kentucky

    More seriously, I agree with your point regarding Goose Island, they are competing in same market. Not sure the same can be said for Blue Moon/Shock Top. I think they are replacing other BMC taps in lots of chain type establishments than only carry Sam Adams and maybe SNPA anyway. I dont see them on tap at craft-centric locations. Who are they keeping off of taps? Hoegaarden?
     
  13. DJMonroe

    DJMonroe Initiate (68) Jan 26, 2013 Washington

    Authority according to all the millions of fans of craft beer and no matter how faux-erudite an argument you want to present or how you juggle semantics, the definition of craft beer is going to be determined by those involved in craft beer. Period. Reinterpreting what I said to suit your purposes - who the hell said ANYTHING about "science" and how would science even remotely relate to this subject? I compared the definition to Tyson's quote to employ a metaphor, not to suggest an equivalency. The POINT was that, as with scientists who regard scientific fact, properly, as immune to matters of subjective belief - doesn't invalidate the comment at all. You're welcome to think it does. I recognize that there is a sub-stratum of people who CALL themselves "craft beer fans" who are fundamentally contrarian by nature and have decided that they can mine that - and p[ropvoke responses - by defending the mega-brewers. The arguments are ALWAYS couched in semantics and the ancient dodge of "you don't make the"rules". Central issues - like the inarguable fact that the VAST majority of true craft beer fans DO regard the Brewers Association as the credible, empowered voice of craft beer - get glossed over with vague nonsense like "nobody has elected them to anything". The basic fact, which isn't going to go away, is that Shock Top and Blue Moon and all the other mega-brewers' desperate attempts to get a toe-hold in craft brewing compete in the marketplace with real craft beers ONLY with people who don't know that they're not. And those are the very people that AB/InBev and MillerCoors rely on to buy them...well those folks and all you contrary types who want to congratulate yourselves on your sophistication. Are they bad beers? Certainly not, although I would argue that Shock Top is a horribly flawed Blue Moon knock-off that has nothing to do with the style of beer it's supposed to be. I'll drink the occasional Blue Moon, on a hot day and given no better choices but I don't, for a second, confuse it with craft beer. You want to be deliberately obtuse about my comments, be my guest. It doesn't change the truth of what I wrote.
     
  14. DJMonroe

    DJMonroe Initiate (68) Jan 26, 2013 Washington

    I recognize that there is a sub-stratum of people who CALL themselves "craft beer fans" who are fundamentally contrarian by nature and have decided that they can mine that - and provoke responses - by defending the mega-brewers. The arguments are ALWAYS couched in semantics and the ancient dodge of "you don't make the"rules". Central issues - like the inarguable fact that the VAST majority of true craft beer fans DO regard the Brewers Association as the credible, empowered voice of craft beer - get glossed over with vague nonsense like "nobody has elected them to anything" or your "self-serving" aside. The basic fact, which isn't going to go away, is that Shock Top and Blue Moon and all the other mega-brewers' desperate attempts to get a toe-hold in craft brewing, compete in the marketplace with real craft beers ONLY with people who don't know that they're not. And those are the very people that AB/InBev and MillerCoors rely on to buy them...well, those folks and all the contrary types who want to congratulate themselves on your sophistication. Are they bad beers? Certainly not, although I would argue that Shock Top is a horribly flawed Blue Moon knock-off that has nothing to do with the style of beer it's supposed to be. I'll drink the occasional Blue Moon, on a hot day and given no better choices, but I don't, for a second, confuse it with craft beer. As for Goose Island, AB/InBev is thrilled by your comment. That is EXACTLY the reaction that the cynical, manipulative bastards pray will prevail. Why do YOU suppose that a gigantic international brewing conglomerate would buy a company that won't produce even a measurable percentage of their total revenues? Because the bean-counters had a collective epiphany and decided that they admire Goose so much they just have to have them? Get real. Goose will continue to be a "craft brewery" until their quality and values become changed by their new ownership and we will all know it when it happens. You want to be deliberately obtuse about my comments, be my guest. It doesn't change the truth of what I wrote. Let's face it: the congloms can and WILL insert beer after beer into the craft arena and they will hope like crazy that people won't care. Well, real craft brewing fans WILL and DO care and those are the people who determine what "craft beer" is.
     
  15. MNAle

    MNAle Crusader (752) Sep 6, 2011 Minnesota

    Feel better now?

    Unlike some others, I don't consider craft beer to be a cause. I consider it to be a product. The very idea that you have to be small to make a competent product in a certain market segment is just silly on its face. Unless, of course, you are driven by a cause.

    I posted numbers earlier that shows that BMC is hardly failing in this segment.

    And, your shrill name-calling sounds an awful lot like someone who is blinded by the cause.

    Go ahead, fight to the end against the evil big beer. The other 90+% of the beer-drinking public will buy the product they enjoy drinking.
     
    azorie, Foyle and KarlHungus like this.
  16. DJMonroe

    DJMonroe Initiate (68) Jan 26, 2013 Washington

    I do feel better. Thanks for asking. You can be as blase as you like about the future and health of craft beer. I care passionately about it and I stopped apologizing for passion about three decades ago. And if you think I'm the only one fighting against the "evil big beer"...boy, are are you in for a surprise. :slight_smile:
     
  17. MNAle

    MNAle Crusader (752) Sep 6, 2011 Minnesota

    I didn't say you are the only one... it is common on this site. I'm just not volunteering for the militia in the cause. The broadening of the taste and variety of been selections is something I appreciate, and I appreciate the likes of Boston Brewing and Summit Brewing for being on the forefront of this. I don't particularly like Blue Moon, but that is because I don't particularly like their somewhat blasé style, not because I don't like their owner. BMC isn't going anywhere, but neither are the small brewers as a whole.

    Just look closely at the definition of craft beer at the Brewers Association. While it tries to sound like it is based on the beer itself, the deciding factor is size and ownership. They are an industry trade association for small brewers. Nothing wrong with that. But, that is what they are.
     
  18. rlcoffey

    rlcoffey Initiate (0) Apr 20, 2004 Kentucky

    1. Not true. Both ABInbev and MillerCoors are members of the BA, IIRC. So not just small brewers.

    2. There is not only nothing wrong with that, IT IS A HUGE DEAL.

    Re: an early post, whats wrong with having a cause?
     
  19. MNAle

    MNAle Crusader (752) Sep 6, 2011 Minnesota

    They'll gladly take their membership dues, but they don't represent them. In fact, they definitionally exclude them.
     
  20. OneBeertoRTA

    OneBeertoRTA Devotee (490) Jan 2, 2010 California
    Beer Trader

    All true which is why craft is growing to it's full potential.
     
  21. KarlHungus

    KarlHungus Poo-Bah (2,889) Feb 19, 2005 Minnesota
    Beer Trader

    There is nothing wrong with having a cause as long as one isn't blinded by their passion for it to the extent that they are unwilling/unable to see/understand any other view point contrary to their cause. Extreme passion is unfortunately too often associated with self imposed ignorance, and ignorance all too often leads to hatred.

    As for a person having craft beer as their cause, I think there are a lot more important issues within our society to take up the cause for (not that people are limited to one cause, but we all have a finite amount of time to devote). I personally see craft beer a food product, and, all be it one I truly enjoy, think that taking it up as a cause would be equivalent to taking up Cool Ranch Doritos as a cause.
     
    Karibourgeois and Foyle like this.
  22. rlcoffey

    rlcoffey Initiate (0) Apr 20, 2004 Kentucky

    They represent them. They just dont consider them craft.

    Its the Brewers Association, not the Craft Brewers Association.

    They represent all beer, for example, their proposed tax change would help Yuengling just as much as it does Sam Adams.
     
  23. rlcoffey

    rlcoffey Initiate (0) Apr 20, 2004 Kentucky

    People write letter campaigns to keep tv shows on the air. Not my thing, but, hey its their cause, let them go at it.

    I guess they email now, but you know what I mean.
     
    KarlHungus likes this.
  24. MNAle

    MNAle Crusader (752) Sep 6, 2011 Minnesota

    While some of the things they propose or lobby for may benefit more than just small brewers, that does not mean they actually represent the larger brewing industry, despite their name.

    Here is a quote from their (BA's) blog:

    "Craftbeer.com is administered by the Brewers Association (BA), the national organization that represents the interests of small and independent craft brewers in America."
    And, from the "Purpose" section of BA's own web site:

    "Brewers Association Purpose
    To promote and protect small and independent American brewers, their craft beers and the community of brewing enthusiasts."

    Maybe you should take your view up with them, since they seem to contradict it.
     
  25. rlcoffey

    rlcoffey Initiate (0) Apr 20, 2004 Kentucky

    Despite what that says, ABInbev clearly derives some benefit from membership. Maybe they consider themselves part of the community of brewing enthusiasts?
     
  26. 05Harley

    05Harley Devotee (443) Feb 8, 2008 New Hampshire

    Coors says his company is looking into brewing more "crafty" labels but remains a banquet beer drinker himself.

    Sounds like a great marketing campaign...
     
  27. MNAle

    MNAle Crusader (752) Sep 6, 2011 Minnesota

    Yes, they see some benefit from it, or they wouldn't spend the money. My speculation is that by being members, they can keep themselves better informed on the BA and its members.
     
  28. Strelnikov

    Strelnikov Aspirant (253) Jan 29, 2008 Texas
    Beer Trader

    Here you go. Pick your talking points, rub a little absorbine jr. on your fingers and have at it:

    Plato once said, “He was a wise man who invented beer,” but that wisdom has phenomenally flowed throughout the market. Today, craft beer is undergoing such a renaissance in America that there are now more breweries inventing flavors of beer than any other time since the 1870s ( or a total of 2,528 as of June, 2013). One not-for-profit trade association serves to promote and protect small and independent craft brewers throughout America.

    As an industry trade group, the main goal of the Brewers Association is to promote and protect its more than 1,900 brewery members. It does this via a number of avenues, including annual craft beer events, government affairs work, and craft beer export development. The BA was not always organized as it is today. In 1978, Charlie Papazian (recognized as the father of modern home-brewing) formed the American Homebrewers Association along with Charlie Matzen. Five years later, in 1983, this group was organized as part of the Association of Brewers with the goal of assisting the fledgling U.S. craft brewing community. In 2005, the Association of Brewers merged with the Brewers’ Association of America to form what is now known as the Brewers Association, a trade group that remarkably represents 99 percent of the beer that is brewed in America.

    Four primary events are held and highlighted annually by the BA. The Craft Brewers Conference & BrewExpo America® is an industry-only event and the largest annual gathering of brewing industry professionals, featuring educational tracks, seminars and, bi-annually, the prestigious World Beer Cup®. The BA also organizes SAVORSM: An American Craft Beer & Food Experience, the nation’s benchmark craft beer and food pairing event, as well as the its largest event; and the Great American Beer Festival®, a fall celebration that compels 50,000 beer lovers from around the world to travel to Denver and savor the flavors from more than 600 American brewers. The American Homebrewers Association, a division of the BA, also annually hosts the National Homebrewers Conference, an event that serves to both enhance the brewing skills of homebrewers and increase camaraderie among the homebrewing community.

    Legislative Advocacy

    The BA fulfills a large role in promoting the interests of small brewers at the federal level and helps those in the industry better navigate through issues in national legislative scene. Craft brewers are valuable small businesses that are creating jobs and reinvigorating communities across the country. The BA continues to back legislation that stands to strengthen the craft brewing community and allow for further job growth.

    One legislative item of particular importance to craft brewers is the Small Brewer Reinvestment and Expanding Workforce Act (Small BREW Act), which was re-introduced in both the Senate (S. 917) and House of Representatives (H.R. 494) earlier in 2013. The Small BREW Act aims to recalibrate the federal excise tax that small brewers pay on each barrel of beer that they produce. A recalibration of the federal excise tax, which hasn’t happened since 1976, would let brewers to reinvest more money in their businesses, thereby allowing for expanded production and distribution. More production and distribution would also present an opportunity for additional job creation. On a national level, the BA also deals with issues such as brewer-distributor relationships, the independence of wholesalers, alcohol content of beer, and franchise laws.

    For state-specific issues, the BA stays in constant contact with state brewing guilds, which deal with legislation on a more local level.

    Exporting Expertise

    The BA also works to promote American craft beers overseas, as the popularity of craft around the globe continues to rise. The Brewers Association Export Development Program (EDP) was created in 2004 and generates exposure for American craft beer through trade shows, festivals, seminars, media outreach and competitions, among other activities.

    In 2012, craft beer export volume increased by a staggering 72 percent compared to 2011, with a value estimated at $49.1 million. Markets such as Canada, Brazil and Southeast Asia are prime areas for American craft beer exports.

    Communicating to Consumers

    Aside from its popular annual events, the BA reaches beer lovers daily through its consumer-facing website, CraftBeer.com. The site was created to communicate the passion, authenticity, excitement and creativity of the craft beer community, while also educating beer lovers of every level.

    In addition to blog posts and the latest craft beer news, CraftBeer.com features educational tools such as style finders, tasting tips, beer and food pairing guides, and tools for supporting your local brewery. The site has become a must-visit web destination for those seeking to learn more about the world of craft beer.

    Greener Shades of Greatness

    Sustainability is a major issue of focus for the BA and its members. Earlier in 2013, the BA unveiled three new sustainability manuals for craft brewers, covering water and wastewater, energy and greenhouse gases, and solid waste. These manuals provide time-saving, specific resources for breweries to operate in a more eco-friendly manner.

    The BA also takes steps to ensure that its events are as environmentally-friendly as possible. For example, the BA partners with two green organizations, ZeroHero and Ecosyste.ms, to promote and showcase sustainable efforts at the Great American Beer Festival®. The Craft Brewers Conference & BrewExpo America® also regularly features a number of seminars and moderated discussions on sustainability practices.

    Partnering in Progress

    One thing unites all employees of the BA: an abiding love of craft beer, the beverage that is continuing to revolutionize American food and drink. BA staff members are dedicated first and foremost to protecting and promoting the beverage they cherish, working hard to put on world-class events and make sure members are up to date on the latest happenings in the world of craft beer.

    The future of craft beer is growing brighter by the day. The craft brewing community has seen tremendous growth over the past decade, to the point that beer made by craft brewers now accounts for 6.5 percent of all beer brewed in the U.S., and 10.2 percent of all American beer sales. There are currently over 2,500 breweries operating in America, with more than 1,600 in planning, and American craft brewers now support over 108,000 jobs. Over the next five years, the BA expects even more segment growth, as Americans continue to demand high-quality, craft brewed beer at an increasing rate. But as craft beer growth continues, quality must remain a top priority. American craft brewers create full-flavored, diverse and unique offerings, and the industry will continue to thrive so long as quality is still the number one driver for brewers.

    For more information, please visit their website at: Brewers Association
     
  29. PsilohsaiBiN

    PsilohsaiBiN Defender (608) Aug 10, 2010 New York
    Beer Trader

    Up yours, Pete Coors!
     
  30. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (2,790) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
    Supporter

    Is that Haiku!?!:confused:

    Cheers!
     
  31. MNAle

    MNAle Crusader (752) Sep 6, 2011 Minnesota

    No. Haiku would be more like...

    Up yours
    Cheap lager brew
    Pete Coors

    :wink:
     
    JimKal and JackHorzempa like this.
  32. rlcoffey

    rlcoffey Initiate (0) Apr 20, 2004 Kentucky

    2-4-2

    bah. That aint haiku.
     
  33. MNAle

    MNAle Crusader (752) Sep 6, 2011 Minnesota

    Hey, whaddya want for a beer forum? Culture? :slight_smile:
     
  34. StuartCarter

    StuartCarter Initiate (0) Apr 25, 2006 Alabama

    TFTFY :stuck_out_tongue:
     
  35. kfh227

    kfh227 Initiate (0) Jan 23, 2011 Connecticut

    Coors is buying craft brewers?

    That's hilarious because what is "the best" today will not be "the best" in 5 years. SImple because new small breweries will always appear. And there is the simple fact that most of us seek out different beers each time we shop. So we don't want to get dogfishhead all the time..... even though it is pretty good. But it's not the best. it's basically the newbie craft beer that acts as a gateways to all the smaller breweries.

    in my opinion of course.
     
  36. Ale_Dog

    Ale_Dog Initiate (0) May 13, 2014 New York

    The only thing he seems confused about is how fast things are changing. Taking his handles off tap = death. There's no way that their pretend craft beers can make up for that. Big companies need stability to survive. This is like an earthquake that he knows is coming but can't get out of the way fast enough. Wouldn't be surprised to see one of these companies go under in the next 10 years when there are 5000+ craft breweries.
     
  37. Brad007

    Brad007 Poo-Bah (3,341) Mar 28, 2007 Vermont

    You know, I can't fault them for thinking that way.

    I worked for a BMC distributor over 10 years ago. They distributed some crafts and emerging pseudo-crafts but AB was their bread and butter. They still think like the typical MBA graduate.
     
    stonewall2 and Brolo75 like this.
  38. Brolo75

    Brolo75 Poo-Bah (1,537) Aug 10, 2013 California
    Beer Trader

    We have some new beers coming out and in each description to us they never talked about how the beer tastes. They use all marketing terms and strategies. They are still so lost when it comes to good beer.
     
    Joshmistake and stonewall2 like this.
  39. rgordon

    rgordon Defender (685) Apr 26, 2012 North Carolina

    They are used to commodity goods that flow through by trailer loads and pallets. Small, funky breweries probably make some of these guys nervous. It is rare indeed to see a commodity distributor embrace smaller breweries and do a good job of carrying most of their products or knowing anything about them. Buy up the brands and kill them is a tactic that I have witnessed often.
     
    Joshmistake likes this.
  40. trh70

    trh70 Initiate (0) Dec 31, 2011 Florida
    Beer Trader

    Pete needs to wake up and realize he can fool people with funny commercials, mascots and mass advertising all he wants. Sooner or later the masses are going to switch from his cesspool swill to the quality the little guys produce. InBev knows this all to well. Which explains their motives for buying out Goose Island and others.
     
    Joshmistake likes this.
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  • About Us

    Founded in Boston in 1996, BeerAdvocate (BA) is your go-to resource for beer powered by an independent community of enthusiasts and professionals dedicated to supporting and promoting better beer.

    Learn More
  • Our Community

    Comprised of consumers and industry professionals, many of whom started as members of this site, our community is one of the oldest, largest, and most respected beer communities online.
  • Our Events

    Since 2003 we've hosted over 60 world-class beer festivals to bring awareness to independent brewers and educate attendees.
  • Our Magazine

    Support uncompromising beer advocacy and award-winning, independent journalism with a print subscription to BeerAdvocate magazine.