Germany Pics of your German (-style) (home-)brews

Discussion in 'Europe' started by herrburgess, May 11, 2013.

  1. herrburgess

    herrburgess Savant (999) Nov 4, 2009 South Carolina
    Industry Beer Trader

    I believe Schlenkerla uses Sahm glassware for all of its beers, and, yes, I think that one (the Antik) is what I drank the Kraeusen out of (can you believe I've never had the Fastenbier...it's even available in NC, but somehow I've never managed to get my hands on some).
     
  2. herrburgess

    herrburgess Savant (999) Nov 4, 2009 South Carolina
    Industry Beer Trader

    Speaking of glassware, here is the planned lineup for my buddy's and my beers. First is, of course, for the Koelsch; second for the Rauch; and third for the (planned) Kellerbier. He's nerding out on this stuff pretty majorly, as you see.

    [​IMG]
     
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  3. Gutes_Bier

    Gutes_Bier Disciple (385) Jul 31, 2011 Germany

    OK, so:

    -no, I can't believe you have not had the Fastenbier yet.
    -I always cry a little on the inside when I realize the Fastenbier is available in the US but isn't in HD (to my knowledge...)
    -I like the glasses, but doesn't that Kellerbier need a Steinkrug?
     
  4. herrburgess

    herrburgess Savant (999) Nov 4, 2009 South Carolina
    Industry Beer Trader

    Calling it a Kellerbier, but it will be more or less a take on a Czech Cerne Pivo in the vein of U Fleku, hence that particular glass.
     
    Gutes_Bier likes this.
  5. Gutes_Bier

    Gutes_Bier Disciple (385) Jul 31, 2011 Germany

    You are talking over my head now! I haven't gotten to the Czech Republic yet.
     
  6. boddhitree

    boddhitree Devotee (482) Apr 13, 2008 Germany

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  7. Gutes_Bier

    Gutes_Bier Disciple (385) Jul 31, 2011 Germany

    Those are also on Amazon. The restaurant supply store near me has these:

    [​IMG]

    but I'm not totally sold on either them. Unfortunately Sahm seems to sell glasses directly (and exclusively) to restaurants and beverage companies, so as of right now I appear to be out of luck. Crud. Those were beautiful.

    Hmmm....
     
    herrburgess likes this.
  8. spartan1979

    spartan1979 Aspirant (295) Dec 29, 2005 Missouri

    I brewed a Dortmunder Export today. It reminded me that I needed to post a pic of my most recent German Bier. An Alt I brewed in June:

    [​IMG]
     
  9. Gutes_Bier

    Gutes_Bier Disciple (385) Jul 31, 2011 Germany

    Sweet glass!
     
  10. Stahlsturm

    Stahlsturm Initiate (0) Mar 21, 2005 Germany

    That looks rather yummy.
     
  11. boddhitree

    boddhitree Devotee (482) Apr 13, 2008 Germany

    I agree, nice Düsseldorfer Schumacher Alt glass. Did you buy it while touring D-dorf?
    Also, how does your beer taste? I remember Dortmunder Export as being yellow/straw colored, though the style is virtually extinct in Germany today.

    This looks like a Hövels. Check out the jazz-infused website, though you might want to turn down the sound... Unfortunately, they're owned by the dreaded Radeberger Gruppe conglomerate. According to Wiki, t's now called Hövels Original, whereas before it was known as Hövels Bitterbier. The current beer recipe stems from 1893, but wasn't produced during WWII and only began production again in 1984. They claim to "lager the beer twice as long as other beers." They also claim to mash at a special temperature.

    On this site, they list the ingredients as light and dark malts, which I'm guessing is Pilsner malt and Carafa malt, a Weyermann chocolate-like malt used in Bocks and Alts. Also, they used Wheat malt and Roasted Malt.
     
  12. spartan1979

    spartan1979 Aspirant (295) Dec 29, 2005 Missouri

    This is an Alt. The Dortmunder was just brewed yesterday. I'll post a pic in about 8 weeks. My Dortmunder is yellow colored. It was brewed with Pils and Munich malts. Hopped with Hallertau and Saaz.

    I did get the glass in Dusseldorf in 2010. I also went to Hövels on that trip. I don't specifically recall what that tasted like, but I enjoyed it.

    Dortmunder is still a BJCP category (for what that is worth). I used to see D.A.B. in St. Louis, but I haven't seen it in many years. But, then again, I haven't been looking for it either.
     
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  13. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (2,683) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania

    “Dortmunder is still a BJCP category (for what that is worth).” I would suggest that the fact the BJCP has a style category of Dortmunder Export is worth quite a bit. I would not be shocked that the only Dortmunder Export beers available a few years from now will be beers brewed by homebrewers and craft breweries. The BJCP will deserve some credit for keeping that style ‘alive’.

    Prost!
     
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  14. spartan1979

    spartan1979 Aspirant (295) Dec 29, 2005 Missouri

    Sadly, that's probably true. Schlafly makes a Dortmunder that's occasionally available in the brewpub.
     
  15. Bierman9

    Bierman9 Poo-Bah (4,144) Dec 20, 2001 New Hampshire
    Beer Trader

    Attractive looking brew! And it looks like it is floating above the table! Prosit!
     
  16. spartan1979

    spartan1979 Aspirant (295) Dec 29, 2005 Missouri

    Thanks. I'm surprised no one mentioned the hops in the background.
     
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  17. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (2,683) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania

    That is because all of the participants on the Germany forum are men. We ‘target’ the beer in the picture, drool, and in a Homer Simpson voice we exclaim: BEER!

    A woman would definitely notice the hops in the background.

    Prost!

    P.S. I had to go back to your post (with the picture) and with your ‘help’ I noticed the hops.
     
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  18. Pegli

    Pegli Initiate (0) Aug 30, 2006 Rhode Island

    So this is where youz guyz hang out...here's some of my latest batches

    Helles Lager
    [​IMG]

    Weissebier
    [​IMG]

    Marzen
    [​IMG]
     
  19. Gutes_Bier

    Gutes_Bier Disciple (385) Jul 31, 2011 Germany

    Looks good to me!
     
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  20. danfue

    danfue Initiate (0) Sep 16, 2012 Germany

    I'm finally getting around to buy all the stuff I need for homebrewing. I was planning to do this for almost two years now, but always delayed it for some reason or other.
    Are there any suggestions as to what style is recommendable for a beginner?
     
  21. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (2,683) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania

    I am assuming that your first batch is an extract batch. Three beer styles often recommended for the first homebrewed batch are Stouts, APAs and IPAs. I personally do not advocate a Stout for a first brew; I would suggest either an APA or IPA (this presumes that you like hoppy beers). Another style that I think would be good for a first brew is an English Bitter Ale.

    In the US there are plenty of homebrew stores (on-line and brick & mortar stores) that will formulate what they call kit beers. Here is an example of a kit beer for an APA from Northern Brewer as an example:http://www.northernbrewer.com/shop/sierra-madre-pale-ale-extract-kit.html

    If you click on the Additional Information tab and then click Recipe and Instructions you can see the ingredients for that particular batch.

    Good luck with your first batch!

    Prost!
     
  22. danfue

    danfue Initiate (0) Sep 16, 2012 Germany

    I'm not planning to do an extract batch. Wanted to start with the full challenge right away. The author of the homebrewing book I read says it's easy if you follow some rules. I hope he's right.
    I already considered an APA or IPA, since these are hard to get here and relatively expensive. So it would be nice to have a few bottles of that in the cellar.
     
  23. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (2,683) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania

    “I'm not planning to do an extract batch. Wanted to start with the full challenge right away. The author of the homebrewing book I read says it's easy if you follow some rules. I hope he's right.”

    There are a number of brewing process steps that you need to successfully get down to brew ‘good’ homebrewed beer. It is often recommended to start with extract brewing to get the brewing process aspects down pat before adding the complexity of all grain brewing. Using a bike riding analogy: it it best to start with training wheels before riding on just two wheels.

    I would recommend that you first start making extract batches and get the myriad of brewing processes ‘rock solid’ before going all grain but needless to say this is your choice.

    As regards the statement that all grain brewing is “easy”. I would just state that it is another level of complexity to the homebrewing process which can be daunting for a first batch

    Prost!
     
  24. einhorn

    einhorn Aspirant (289) Nov 3, 2005 California
    Beer Trader

    MJ - if you check out just about any independent Getränkemarkt, they should be able to help you with glassware.

    Also somewhere worth stopping in is IGF Dilloway. Mark Dilloway is an old customer in Meckesheim who might be able to help you out in general with beer.
     
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  25. herrburgess

    herrburgess Savant (999) Nov 4, 2009 South Carolina
    Industry Beer Trader

    I went straight to all-grain brewing. If you have the equipment and some guidance, it's not too difficult at all. My first beer was an English-style Pale Ale. Maris Otter and English Kent Goldings. Kegged in party kegs with about a teaspoon of corn sugar. Closest thing to UK cask I've had. My wife still clamors for me to make more of that very first beer....
     
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  26. Gutes_Bier

    Gutes_Bier Disciple (385) Jul 31, 2011 Germany

    Thank you for this. Sadly, I actually don't think there are any independent Getränkemärkte in HD, but I will continue to hunt!
     
    einhorn likes this.
  27. tectactoe

    tectactoe Initiate (0) Mar 20, 2012 Michigan

    [​IMG]


    First attempt at a Berliner Weissebier. Didn't come out exactly as expected, but it seems to be getting more tart with time, which is a good thing.
     
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  28. danfue

    danfue Initiate (0) Sep 16, 2012 Germany

    Alright, I brewed my first batch yesterday. Target: a kind of Amber/Red Lager, maybe a Vienna Lager, even though no one knows what exactly that was. I used a Red Pilsner malt, some Munich and some Vienna Lager to get a color of about 22-25 EBC. I'm afraid, I miscalculated the hops, using way too much bitter hops. Better drop that next time and use only aroma hops. Might become way more bitter than anticipated. I used Spalter Select, Spalter Spalt and Hallertauer Merkur.

    The beginning, 6 am yesterday morning, weighing the malt: 2.5 kg Red Pilsner, 1 kg each Munich and Vienna.
    [​IMG]

    Some hours later. Hops is weighed and ready to enter the (almost) boiling wort.
    [​IMG]

    Final filtering of the wort. Still a bit dark, but might become reddish-brown after fermenting.
    [​IMG]

    I added the yeast late last night, when I got up this morning it was merrily fermenting. This is how it looked this afternoon.
    [​IMG]

    Will be reporting back after bottling it, and more importantly, after tasting it!
     
  29. spartan1979

    spartan1979 Aspirant (295) Dec 29, 2005 Missouri

    Here are my two latest German style homebrews:

    [​IMG]

    The one on the left is a Dortmunder. The one on the right is a clone of Faust's Schwarzviertler.

    I'm disappointed in the Dortmunder. It's from a recipe I haven't brewed in many years, but the recipe has resulted in a beer that went to the AHA NHC Finals. This one came out fruity. But it does seem to be getting better as it ages.

    The Faust clone came out pretty good. I was going to call it a "Miltenberger Dunkel" but I recently found out that Faust is using Miltenberger as their brand name in the US. This has been lagering for only three weeks. It tastes pretty similar to the original but the original is thinner. But I don't think I'm going to change anything.

    Next, I'll retry brewing my Alt. Anybody got a recipe for Kneitinger Bock?
     
  30. danfue

    danfue Initiate (0) Sep 16, 2012 Germany

    So, today after 5 weeks and 2 days of "lagering" I did my first proper tasting of my first ever homebrew (see above). I did try already after two weeks and after four weeks. It really has grown over the course of time. I'm really surprised, it works out so well. The color is mainly brown with a hint of red, if you hold the glass against the light, it glows red.
    There are still a few things that could be improved (the malty, slightly sweetish body could come out a bit stronger; as I wrote before, I miscalculated the hops - still it doesn't taste too bitter despite its 45 IBU; filtering for a little clearness could be improved; the foam is huge and bubbly at the beginning, but could be a bit firmer), but overall I'm quite satisfied. The hops is present while not overpowering, and the malts give a little hint of nuts and dark chocolate. If it weren't for the bottom-fermenting yeast I used, it could go as an Alt. It's a good and very well drinkable beer for the first time I did this.
    As I wrote above, I attempted to go for a Vienna Lager, so I called it Wiener Schmäh (that's the term for the special sense of humor and kind of wit that is attributed to the people of Vienna) and put Hans Moser, one of Vienna's most popular characters from the last century, on the label.
    I brewed my second batch, a classic Hefeweizen, in mid-December. This one should be drinkable next week.

    [​IMG]
     
  31. Gutes_Bier

    Gutes_Bier Disciple (385) Jul 31, 2011 Germany

    Looks and sounds delicious! Nice work!
     
  32. Stahlsturm

    Stahlsturm Initiate (0) Mar 21, 2005 Germany

    Given the context that's very funny :)
     
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  33. danfue

    danfue Initiate (0) Sep 16, 2012 Germany

    And my second one, a classic Hefeweizen I called Monopol. There's not much to write about this one. It's alright, it's drinkable, but I was a little disappointed. It lacks some body, the yeast is way too sour (WLP300). I used a different mashing procedure for this one, worked with a recipe with only one large Kombirast instead of three or four rests. I'll definitely try another more thorough procedure next time I brew a Weißbier.

    My next one will maybe be an attempt at a California style Pale Ale, already found a clone recipe of SNPA that is deemed to be excellent by other homebrewers. Still have to wait a bit though: have to empty the bottles first and the online merchant is short of Cascade. Or, maybe the next one will be a Maibock which should be brewed in early February to be drinkable by late April.

    [​IMG]
     
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  34. spartan1979

    spartan1979 Aspirant (295) Dec 29, 2005 Missouri

    Here's my latest German-style homebrew, a Bamberger Kellerbier:

    [​IMG]

    It's the first time I've brewed one of these. It's based on a recipe that was in a recent issue of Zymurgy. I'm pleased with how it came out. I have a bottle of Mahr's U that I need to compare it to.

    My next beer is supposed to be a Rauchbier. I'm waiting for some Weyermann malts to come in.
     
  35. herrburgess

    herrburgess Savant (999) Nov 4, 2009 South Carolina
    Industry Beer Trader

    Sieht sueffig aus. Prost!
     
  36. AlcahueteJ

    AlcahueteJ Zealot (598) Dec 4, 2004 Massachusetts

  37. herrburgess

    herrburgess Savant (999) Nov 4, 2009 South Carolina
    Industry Beer Trader

  38. AlcahueteJ

    AlcahueteJ Zealot (598) Dec 4, 2004 Massachusetts

    Sorry, I should have clarified. I meant in terms of glass style, not the exact glass. I only ask because I really dig those glasses you have. Or maybe it's the beer in them that makes them look great? ;)
     
  39. steveh

    steveh Poo-Bah (1,833) Oct 8, 2003 Illinois

    Those are typical Kölsch stangs. Like to get a few myself, but my wife bought me a great set of beer glasses recently and I've been enjoying them -- including a great, unmarked Willibecker -- perfect for German-styles.
     
  40. mmmbirra

    mmmbirra Aspirant (202) Apr 19, 2009 Italy

    In a bit of different spirit here, but I recently moved into a new place. The former owner had a quite large, to say the least, collection of beer cans, most of which were German in origin. Here's a pic of some of them. The entire wall was originally floor to ceiling with cans, and apparently there were no duplicates. Keep in mind the ceiling is 4 meters 70 centimeters high.
    [​IMG]
     
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