Comment Rating a beer when you don't like the style

Discussion in 'Feedback' started by Casey3236, Oct 10, 2013.

  1. crazyfoMostout

    crazyfoMostout May 16, 2013 Missouri

    But you made a blanket statement about beer styles in your original post and then gave only three examples to back up your first statement. Irish Stouts have been around since the early 1700s. IPA 's have been known by that name since the 1840s and the schilling reference in respect to Scottish ale started in the early 1900s. Your examples are still incorrect.
     
    RobertColianni likes this.
  2. 77black_ships

    77black_ships Dec 4, 2012 Belgium

    I do get it upset when people ding a beer for characteristics which are common to the style, acting like they are flaws.
    A good recent example is, Emelisse recently aged a beer on Balsamic Vinegar barrels, lots of people rated it badly on the other side for having Balsamic Vinegar notes that is just crazy in my opinion.
    I love sours & Balsamic vinegar & it was a very enjoyable and well-done beer with complexity.
    There are people who rate sours badly because they don’t like sours, where is the logic?

    I like sours more than DIPA’s but I have given 4.5+ for what I considered to be great DIPA’s, I enjoyed them greatly. I have even given good scores for pale lagers which were good compared to other pale lagers.

    Still people are free to do it if they want to.
     
  3. mudbug

    mudbug Mar 27, 2009 Oregon

    An interesting aside from this is the "styles" that are so broad that you can find a gem and a drainpour side by side on the shelf. Like "Fruit/Vegetable Beer"
     
  4. JamesStreet

    JamesStreet May 9, 2013 Louisiana
    Beer Trader

    Personally, I like most styles of beer. Some more than others. When I rate a style that, say, is one of my lesser favorites (doesn't mean I don't like it), i tend to rate it according to style. It might get a higher rating than a beer from a more favorable style.
     
  5. marquis

    marquis Nov 20, 2005 United Kingdom (England)

    My post was a reply to this comment;"Beer styles, most hundreds of years old, refer specifically to ingredients and processes used in producing that beer."
    Stouts were brewed in Ireland in the late 1700s but it was a London originated beer. Guinness set up his brewery in Dublin but brought over the Purser family from London to do his brewing.Before 1819 and the invention of Black Patent Malt ,Stouts and Porters (words used interchangeably) were never black.Dry Irish Stout did not appear until the 1950s.Modern Guinness is quite unlike what my father might have drunk.
    As for IPA, the 1840s version would have been aged, affected with Brett and fermented to dryness.Nothing at all like a modern one, Orval is perhaps the nearest thing nowadays.After 1840 they got weaker, settling down below 6% ABV. By 1920 IPA had become a synonym for Bitter or simple Pale Ale.
    As for the shilling (not schilling) Scottish beers, these were simply the wholesale price of a hogshead.There could be a 70 shilling Pale Ale or a 70 shilling Porter.
    Names have been around for a long time. Like "ships" though, the articles described have changed beyond recognition.

    http://drinks.seriouseats.com/2012/09/beer-myth-porter-stout-history-truth-three-threads-names.html


    http://barclayperkins.blogspot.co.uk/2011/10/classic-horst.html
     
  6. shawnohall

    shawnohall Nov 8, 2009 Texas

    I had my first (and probably last) Chile Beer, No Label Don Jalapeno Ale, and didn't care for it at all. I don't think a beer should make you thirsty. It's obviously a style I'm not into, but I gave it a 3.5 score because I know several people that like it, so I'm thinking it must be a fairly good example of the style.
     
  7. Biffster

    Biffster Mar 29, 2004 Michigan

    Disclaimer: I take my judging pretty seriously.

    I think if you have the knowledge and ability and discipline to rate a beer to style, I actually think it is marginally easier to rate a beer in a style that ISN'T your favorite. You are less likely to bring personal bias in to the rating process.

    Not everyone can do that though. It's most important to be self aware of how you rate, and rate accordingly. If you know you are going to ding a balsamic vinegar barrel aged beer (to use the above example) for the very thing it was designed to be, then don't rate it. In my case, I know I'd LOVE to try that beer. It sounds intriguing and complex. I also know, with virtual certainty, that I would not ask for a second glass. But if the brewer pulled it off with balance and complexity, it'd get a fair rating from me, even if I had no interest in finishing it.
     
  8. stella77artois

    stella77artois Nov 4, 2010 New York

    I try to put it all in perspective. We all have different styles we like and don't like, but many of us "know" I guess, when a beer is good. For example, I'm not the biggest fan of Belgian Ales. Yet I still give high grades to La Fin du Monde, Neighbor of the Beast, because although they aren't my favorite style, they taste good to me. Same goes for Hefeweizen's. Not really a big fan, but there are some that I like.

    Kind of hard to explain, and it's not a perfect system, but I try to grade all beers with a combo of how well they taste to me, vs how well they represent their style. Probably doesn't make sense, but hopefully some of you get what I'm saying.
     
  9. MCDub

    MCDub Dec 17, 2009 North Carolina
    Beer Trader


    Developing a taste for the style
     
  10. azorie

    azorie Mar 18, 2006 Florida

    I rate every beer I drink every time I taste a sip. First off lets not confuse things. Its your account when you review a beer/lace its your opinion. I write down my notes for every single beer I ever drank, even if its on a book of matches. WHY because I love to KNOW why I hated/loved/liked a beer.....later if my description of that beer makes me curious I may go try it again. So review for YOURSELF.

    I am not posting it for you to read, Its just my notes. I do review on here when I want to do a further expansion OF my own notes. Or if its frankly a beer I love and I want it to be rated higher. Still I just get 1 vote!

    frankly I like the RB method of rating better TBH.
     
  11. TruePerception

    TruePerception Aug 30, 2013 California

    Which is...?
     
  12. azorie

    azorie Mar 18, 2006 Florida

    Rate beer sheet?
    http://www.ratebeer.com/documents/tastingsheet.pdf‎

    I like more scale than 1 to 5..... 1 to 20 is better.
     
  13. TruePerception

    TruePerception Aug 30, 2013 California

    Nah. Too standardized. It's nice to have examples in front of you, but that format forces you into rating a very specific way. I prefer an open system, especially since taste and smell are largely situational. Each person draws on their own experiences in enjoying and identifying beers. Why limit that?
     
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