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Recipe Critique: Hoppy Tripel

Discussion in 'Homebrewing' started by axeman9182, Feb 23, 2012.

  1. axeman9182

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    I'm trying to finalize the recipe for a hoppy tripel for my next brew. The first draft that I sketched out is below, any and all comments are welcome (though I am pretty set on using Galaxy hops):

    14lbs Pilsner Malt
    1.25lbs Sugar
    .5lbs Aromatic Malt
    .5lbs Flaked Wheat

    1oz Galaxy @ 20 minutes
    1oz Galaxy @ 10 minutes
    2oz Galaxy @ flameout
    2oz Galaxy @ dryhop

    Wyeast 3787 Trappist High Gravity

    OG: 1.082 (65% efficiency)
    FG: 1.011
    ABV: 9.5%
    IBU: 37.1
     
  2. jslot38

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    Maybe just missed a line in the carry over... but no 60 minute bittering hop addition?
     
  3. VikeMan

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    Galaxy is a high alpha hop. Those additions at those times look like plenty to get to 37 (or more) IBUs. I assume the intent is to 'hop burst' with late additions for more flavor.
     
  4. axeman9182

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    Yup. The Galaxy pellets I have on hand are 13%AA and I'm trying to stay within roughly the parameters of a normal tripel as far as bitterness is concerned.
     
  5. jslot38

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    One method certainly, and I have yet to experiment with hop bursting as a replacement for more traditional bittering methods. However, 37 IBUs of late addition hops does not necessarily equal the bitterness level that may be expected from 37 IBUs. Late addition hops don't give you bitterness the same way 60 minute additions do. They will give you aroma and taste characteristics. Maybe that's what the OP is driving for though?
     
  6. jslot38

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    I think my confusion then was just over the use of the term "hoppy." I took it to mean something with some hop bitterness.
     
  7. VikeMan

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    I understand that the same amount of hops at 60 minutes, rather than 20 and 10, would give more bitterness. But it would be a whole lot more than the 37 IBUs the OP is shooting for. But he only wants 37 IBUs, and his hop schedule is a valid way to get there.
     
  8. Gueuzedude

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    I think you are confusing AAU (e.g. IBU potential) with IBU actuals. He is shooting for 37 IBU actual and you can get this by adding the traditional bittering charge for 60+ minute, or you can add a lot more hops later in the boil and get the same amount of IBU actuals due to much reduced isomerization of alpha acids.
     
  9. jamescain

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    I brewed something similar to this a few months ago. I stuck with the traditional Belgian Tripel flavor characteristics, aka lower IBUs then an IPA would be, and dry hopped it to provide the "American IPA" aroma. It turned out awesome and a nice beer to give to people that "hate" IPAs because of the bitterness. I used hops with fruity aroma characteristics to match what I figured the yeast would give me, rather then piney hops, so I would say Galaxy would be perfect. Your recipe looks good to me.
     
  10. cmac1705

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    I see no reason why this recipe wouldn't get you what you're looking for.
     
  11. flagmantho

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    This recipe sounds great; I'll have to put a hoppy tripel on my list to do here in the next couple months. I don't have Galaxy, but Citra ought to work.
     
  12. axeman9182

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    Anybody have any thoughts on a mash temp/fermentation temp? I was thinking that after a couple days of ambient temperatures (which should have it fermenting around 67 degrees), I would bump it up to 70 for a bit, and then maybe into the low 70s to finish drying it out.
     
  13. kjyost

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    I'd aim for 148F - 150F as you normally want your triples dry. That said, you have 15% of your fermentable sugars coming from table sugar so that will help dry it out on its own...
     
  14. DaveJanssen

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    To be clear, is your ambient temp around 67 or are you factoring in that the fermentation will make the beer warmer than ambient. I think fermenting high 60's to low/mid 70's sounds good. And I agree with the mash temp suggestion above.

    When is brew day? Have fun.
     
  15. cmac1705

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    I like mashing Belgian strong ales real low, around 146, for about 1.5 hours. Your fermentation profile sounds about like what I would do, i.e. pitch at about 65 and ramp up to around 75 over the course of a week.
     
  16. axeman9182

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    In general, the liquid thermometer stuck to the side of my primary bucket hits about 67 during active fermentation, so I've been taking that to be the actual fermentation temperature.

    I ordered the ingredients on Friday, so I'll probably end up brewing either Sunday or Monday.
     
  17. DaveJanssen

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    Cool, I was a bit worried that it was ambient temp and you were going to ferment much warmer than desired. Sounds like it should be a good beer.
     
  18. mnstorm99

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    I like the yeast you have selected for this recipe (which looks good), but would suggest a cooler fermentation temperature in order to mellow out those fruity esters a bit so they don't get muddled with the hops. Of course this is based on my palate and you can do it however you want.

    Another small side point, I always will prefer just a bit of a 60 minute addition. I will admit though that I have been left unimpressed with the three or four beers I have tried without that 60 minute addition included.
     
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