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Serious brewery criteria

Discussion in 'Beer Talk' started by VitoFerrante, Feb 18, 2013.

  1. coreyfmcdonald

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    Smaller breweries can more easily make "serious money" and not "spin their wheels" when they can sell beer at an extreme premium. This is one of the reasons Kuhnhenn could be a "serious brewery" without bottling or distributing very much beer at all.
     
  2. kzoobrew

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    But Goose Island is autonomous and since InBev has not affected their quality so their are immune to all criticism regarding their parent companies business practices.....

    I will admit that BAs are the first group to throw out the criticism about breweries chasing profits instead of better beer but that only happens after they don't get a beer, it is priced higher than they'd like, don't like a beer or don't like a brewery. Some issue this as honest criticism and are not impacted by some sort of butthurt, we need more of those people.
     
    beertunes likes this.
  3. freeride

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    Bottling and canning as a requirement to be a brewery? No chance. I love nuggets like Piece (http://www.piecechicago.com/flash/index.html) here in Chicago who only do local and only do growlers. They are well represented with awards, and make a pretty damn good piece of pizza as well. They own a facility that rivals some of the "bottled" beer out of Chicago breweries but have zero bottles or cans. Seems to be a model that works just fine.

    IMO, since you asked, this is the way the market is trending. Away from nationally available and more towards local. Great diversity and challenges to up everyone's game and I think it's a great thing.
     
  4. tommyz

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    Ah, I totally mistook what you were actually saying..lol..Thanks for explaining..
     
  5. joelwlcx

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    Idk, man. I got this vibe ever since I first looked up this site. Also, the Goose Island/Bud deal is just one example. Take a look at all the Kraft beer being brewed by BMC, and you'll have a better idea of what I'm talking about. These companies take a beautiful idea (brewing you're own awesome beer), and they they twisted it into a market to be exploited, then they brew rather meh stuff and give it a catchy name that suggests that it's actual craft beer. They're exploiting their competition by selling another bottle with a colorful label.

    Off topic- and for what it's worth; I, personally, didn't care much for BCBS, or any other Goose Island beer exept their oatmeal stout. But that was discontinued before they sold the company, unless I'm mistaken... So I couldn't give any less of a damn that GI sold out.
     
    yemenmocha likes this.
  6. Providence

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    Oh I agree with you the vibe is totally here. There is a "we don't like the big boys" vibe that dominates the conversations on Beeradvocate. But in practice beeradvocates actually do like the big boys. You'll see people on beeradvocate that shit on AbInbev, and then in the forum they are posting a "ISO: Rare" thread.
     
  7. Blanco

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    The furthest I'll go is to say that brewing great beer in large-ish quantities (see Goose, Founders, Stone) is more impressive to me than brewing great beer on a tiny level. But it's not a necessity. I also feel that producing great beer on a small level is more impressive than producing mediocre to good beer on a large level. Where it starts to get interesting is when I ask myself if I'm more impressed with Founders or Hill Farmstead (fill in the blank with any large/small brewery)? I'm undecided.
     
  8. brewsader

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    yeah you can tell a brewery has really made it when their beer can sit on a warm shelf past its "best by" date after traveling across the country. i wish smaller breweries wouldn't rush into bottling/canning because when they do, it's often done by other large breweries who aren't making the same product and distribute to places where the local support isn't there to provide demand for the product.

    don't get me wrong, i love that i can get some of the best beer from around the world in bottles and/or cans, but i'd love it even more if beer of the same quality was being made locally. personally, i'd prefer to move in that direction for the reasons coldone mentioned.
     
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  9. yemenmocha

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    Completely agree.

    Misguided criteria here.

    So many breweries or brewpubs are well-funded and suck. Quite a few make great beers but take awhile to bottle or can or export to other states.
     
  10. yemenmocha

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    Oh I think you're right. And I think many still don't know about GI being a Busch product, INBEV, whatever. That has more to do with it. There is a strong anti-profits, anti-free market sentiment out there. Many want prices to remain artificially low even though demand would support higher, they want the contradiction of beer being respected, yet also cheap & the common man's drink too. On and on...
     
  11. joelwlcx

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    Whatever happened to the good old days when brewing was artisan's craft?

    Oh, right... the industrial revolution, and fractional reserve banking happened.
     
  12. terrapinfan88

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    Russian River... The Alchemist? New belgium and goose island are all over the place and I don't care for but 1 or 2 of their six packs. Its all about quality/what you like. all it takes is a 10 - 25 percent boost from MC or AB and you can distribute all over.

    Not quite sure what anyone is contending for, but if you think about it you can put what ever you want in cans or bottles and the big boys aren't gonna bat an eye. I would argue Stone is probably one of the most/more profitable breweries in the American craft market and BMC has amounts of money the people at Stone, and most Americans can't even fathom.

    Again not sure exactly who's competing for what but AB... FTW.

    Shit Miller Lite comes in 7million different formats, Muh fuggin Vortex bottles n sheit, and thats just ONE beer. Wait till sunset wheat comes in aluminum pints! Move over mister Busch, Tenth and Blake in the Hizzy!
     
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