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The Wanderer - overcarbonated

Discussion in 'Pacific' started by salzar, Jul 24, 2012.

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  1. salzar

    salzar Initiate (0) Dec 27, 2008 California

    Opened a bottle of the wanderer last night and it nearly foamed out of the bottle, has any one else had similar experience? Should I start thinking of drinking my other bottle?
     
  2. vacax

    vacax Initiate (0) Jun 3, 2008 California
    Beer Trader

    Why would you need to drink the other bottle now? Just make sure it is cold whenever you open it.
     
  3. Soonami

    Soonami Initiate (0) Jul 16, 2008 Pennsylvania

    It's a wild ale, so it's already infected. I don't think if you wait another year more than it's already been in the bottle, it'll carbonate more
     
  4. stupac2

    stupac2 Zealot (518) Feb 22, 2011 California
    Beer Trader

    Isn't infection usually caused by stuff that shouldn't be in a Flanders?

    Regardless, I wouldn't be worried, sometimes beers gush.
     
  5. Wowcoolman

    Wowcoolman Crusader (799) Sep 25, 2010 California
    Beer Trader

    Did you like the taste?
     
  6. Soonami

    Soonami Initiate (0) Jul 16, 2008 Pennsylvania

    Not sure if the Wanderer is a Flanders red or "wild" ale, but the non-Saccharomyces microbes that make these beer sour and contribute the trademark funkiness are really good at fermenting more complex sugars and polysaccharides that budding yeast are not able to consume. This is what makes wild beers so dry. Because they can eat up most of the sugars, spoiling organisms don't have much left to eat and won't continue to ferment much more, causing more carbon dioxide accumulation.

    I think OP's question was suggesting if he/she should drink the beer now out of fear that the overcarbonation issue could get worse (perhaps due to infection). I don't think so.

    And as stupac2 said, sometime beers will overcarbonate. I homebrew and occaisionally have problems with beers gushing, especially sour beers that are highly carbonated already which have a lot of sediment. Pours from bottles where the sediment is roused tend to be more foamy since the sediment provide nucleation points for the dissolved gas to come out of solution.
     
  7. nanobrew

    nanobrew Initiate (0) Dec 31, 2008 California

    this happens from time to time with wild/sour beers. Some Cantillons/3F are known to do this, along with LA, JP beers, and I had a Crooked Stave WWBR gush all over at a tasting last weekend. C'est la vie
     
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