Thoughts on water report

Discussion in 'Homebrewing' started by TooHopTooHandle, Aug 16, 2018.

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  1. TooHopTooHandle

    TooHopTooHandle Initiate (0) Dec 20, 2016 New York

    I was just looking on thoughts of how this water report is. I always use distilled, but going to have to be building off of this profile.
    [​IMG]
     
  2. wasatchback

    wasatchback Devotee (412) Jan 12, 2014 Tajikistan
    Trader

    Looks pretty good.... for Pale beers you need to deal with the alkalinity. it might require too much acid to get to lower mash PH values without modification, not sure off the top of my head. My alkalinity is in the 240 range but hardness is also much higher. I’ve been starting to preboil and decant which I believe effectively gets my alkalinity in the 60-80 range and then just adjust with acid.

    Basically if you were to preboil and decant your CA would be around 20 and alkalinity around 80 maybe a little lower. All other minerals stay the same and you can adjust from there.

    Google decarbonation by boiling.

    Looks like decent water otherwise. Great for stouts probably without any adjustment.
     
    #2 wasatchback, Aug 16, 2018
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2018
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  3. epk

    epk Initiate (165) Jun 10, 2008 New Jersey

    I was thinking the same. It's definiately on the high end. Otherwise, he has pretty good sulfate and cholride levels for building off of. Worth plugging it into one of the spreadsheets just to get a handle of what's going on.

    That said, I know when I was looking into my own town's water, there was much more of a range of each mineral content (and it was a wide range with sulfates being something like 50 - 250). I was told that due to my location in town and drawing from seperate wells, the water could be vastly different at any given time. Give the ambiguity, I decided to just build up from RO. A single water sample obviously wouldn't show this, just something to consider.
     
  4. TooHopTooHandle

    TooHopTooHandle Initiate (0) Dec 20, 2016 New York

    Thanks for the advice. Trying to get this water situation under control for 3BBL batches. Using distilled water is just not do able at that scale.
     
  5. wasatchback

    wasatchback Devotee (412) Jan 12, 2014 Tajikistan
    Trader

    3BBLs? Sheesh.

    It might not be cost effective to preboil then. I guess you could preboil in HLT and pull off?

    Might want to look into Lime treatment. I start to gloss over when I read about it so I’m of no use.
     
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  6. TooHopTooHandle

    TooHopTooHandle Initiate (0) Dec 20, 2016 New York

    Thanks for your input though! Maybe @honkey or @JohnnyChicago might be able to chime in
     
  7. JohnnyChicago

    JohnnyChicago Initiate (0) Sep 3, 2010 Illinois

    Oh, I’m a spoiled Great Lakes brewer. water is the least of my concerns! :grin:

    Where in NY are you? I lived there for 5 years and battled that water...
    Also, have you brewed with the water straight - no mineral? Curious to see what, if any, off-flavor you got...
     
  8. TooHopTooHandle

    TooHopTooHandle Initiate (0) Dec 20, 2016 New York

    I have not brewed with the water yet, my first brew with it will be Wednesday next week. Do you see any concerns with the HCO3?

    In North Syracuse, what area were you in?
     
  9. VikeMan

    VikeMan Poo-Bah (2,028) Jul 12, 2009 Pennsylvania
    Society

    I would never be concerned about the absolute numbers per se for bicarbonate or total alkalinity. It does affect mash pH, but adding acids can counter that. So I'd recommend getting Ca where you want it (for the yeast), SO4 and Cl where you want them for flavor (there may be tradeoffs between these and the Ca), and add phosphoric acid, lactic acid, or acid malt to get pH right.
     
  10. JohnnyChicago

    JohnnyChicago Initiate (0) Sep 3, 2010 Illinois

    I was in NYC. Lot of water adjustments...

    Your bicarbonate is a bit high, but certainly not crazy. I brew with water over 100 now. If you are noticing it, you can always invest in an RO filter and build your water up, or just go half and half. But I’m sure you will be fine adjusting with gypsum, calcium chloride, and phos.
    I’d avoid going straight off a city water report, as I’ve found them to be very variable. Might be a good idea to reach out to a local brewer and ask for some tips to get your adjustments in the right general area.
     
  11. TooHopTooHandle

    TooHopTooHandle Initiate (0) Dec 20, 2016 New York

    That was a ward labs report. I'm gonna give it a couple runs with making adjustments and see where I land with that.
     
  12. TooHopTooHandle

    TooHopTooHandle Initiate (0) Dec 20, 2016 New York

    Thanks,
    That's what my plan was to try and see how it goes. Just coming from always brewing with distilled water I wanted to make sure it would be ok. It does require alot more lactic acid that I normally use and from what I've been reading 2ml per gallon is "undetectable in the finished product" but I will on be around the 1ml per gallon on most stuff after doing salt additions
     
  13. StupidlyBrave

    StupidlyBrave Initiate (74) Jan 2, 2009 Pennsylvania

    Your report is similar to mine. But your bicarbonate value is higher.

    I use the approach to build on my profile similar to what Vikeman recommends. I use a spreadsheet based on Palmer's recommended ranges to estimate the results, but basically I use lactic acid to control Mash PH for pale beers. For IPAs, I'll also add a little gypsum and calcium chloride. Other than lactic acid (which I put in the mash water), I treat mash and sparge water the same.

    For really dark beers I have done no additions and felt the end result was quite delicious.
     
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