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USDA National Hop Report - 2012

Discussion in 'Homebrewing' started by HerbMeowing, Jan 15, 2013.

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  1. HerbMeowing

    HerbMeowing Nov 10, 2010 Virginia

  2. AlCaponeJunior

    AlCaponeJunior May 21, 2010 Texas

    Good cuz I need some citra and simcoe
     
  3. HerbMeowing

    HerbMeowing Nov 10, 2010 Virginia

    Acreage of Citra and Simcoe pale in comparison with CTZ...Cascade...and Nugget by a magnitude of one or two.
     
  4. mikehartigan

    mikehartigan Apr 9, 2007 Illinois

    Interesting -- Citra acreage was more than doubled but the yield was down by almost one third. Nevertheless, there was more Citra harvested in 2012 than there was in the previous two years combined. Where did it all go? And, given that homebrewers pay about 4 times the average price, shouldn't we be at the front of the line? ;)
     
    jlpred55 and HerbMeowing like this.
  5. hopfenunmaltz

    hopfenunmaltz Jun 8, 2005 Michigan

    No contracts. We are bottom feeders that get hops that have passed through many hands,and we buy in super small quantity compredb to a commercial. Brewer.
     
  6. mikehartigan

    mikehartigan Apr 9, 2007 Illinois

    Indeed! Though it seems to me that a wise (or not so wise) grower might consider reserving a bit more for the high priced market.
     
  7. HerbMeowing

    HerbMeowing Nov 10, 2010 Virginia

    German growers and their Hallertau are reported to have strong reserves for that very reason.
     
  8. hopdog09

    hopdog09 Sep 6, 2012 Michigan

    grow your own fellas..it's the only way to fly
     
  9. mikehartigan

    mikehartigan Apr 9, 2007 Illinois

    I jumped on that bandwagon during the shortage a couple years ago when $50/lb was suddenly 'normal'. I planted two rhizomes each of Cascade and Sterling. Strung them up behind the shed. My yard in the area of the shed is now virtually overrun with hop bines! I've found them sprouting 20' away from the original bed - I fully expect to see them even farther away this year. They've overtaken the wildflower bed and have virtually wiped out the strawberries (needless to say, they are not warming my wife up to this hobby). They're wrapping themselves around bags of charcoal inside the shed. And they're labor intensive. At today's price of around $10/lb, it's just not worth the effort, IMO. I'm seriously considering using an herbicide on them.
     
  10. telejunkie

    telejunkie Sep 14, 2007 Vermont

    they put out some serious runners...had to leave mine with my psycho ex, but came back to them for harvest last year and man the runners some of them sent out into the field were like 20ft+ long trying to find a hole in the turf...reminded me of the scene in the Hurt Locker where the guy finds a wire and just keeps pulling up more & more buried wire.
     
  11. hopdog09

    hopdog09 Sep 6, 2012 Michigan

    yeah..they do travel I've got mine (chinook, sterling, Mt. hood) in dedicated mounds with cut off 36" culverts filled with soil..even with that I still have to thin them quite a bit or they become root bound..it does put the "home" in homebrewed
     
  12. GreenKrusty101

    GreenKrusty101 Dec 4, 2008 Nevada

    "I'm seriously considering using an herbicide on them."

    See a counselor, first, please. : )
     
    mikehartigan likes this.
  13. STKPICR0720

    STKPICR0720 Mar 16, 2011 Alabama

    Just curious but where are you getting Cascade and Sterling at $10 a pound?
     
  14. reverseapachemaster

    reverseapachemaster Sep 21, 2012 Texas

    You could pull them up and sell to another homebrewer and buy yourself a pound of hops. Probably split up the rootball and sell the same plant multiple times.
     
  15. reverseapachemaster

    reverseapachemaster Sep 21, 2012 Texas

    The demand for Citra has shot up dramatically the past two years. Demand is still way, way over supply. Same goes for Simcoe. Keep in mind as well when the hops are harvested and make their way to the breweries through middle companies, they end up in containers in freezers waiting to be used all year long. So they are out there and will be used over the course of a year.

    As others have said, we're last in line. The growers contract out to large brewers and wholesalers. The wholesalers sell to retail who sell to us. The growers usually don't have excess hops to sell direct (except those that do, of course) because the acreage is under contract. The wholesalers don't want to sell retail. So we are paying a premium to be at the bottom of the supply chain. That's why hopsdirect and others are almost always cheaper than your local shop. A local shop here sells cascades of questionable age for $4/oz. Ridiculous...
     
  16. dennho

    dennho Oct 29, 2006 New York

  17. STKPICR0720

    STKPICR0720 Mar 16, 2011 Alabama

    Some people are buying hops that are locally grown in their area instead of buying from out west online.
    Of course they are paying a small premium for the freshness I would think. I think worth it though.
     
  18. mikehartigan

    mikehartigan Apr 9, 2007 Illinois

    Unless you're wet hopping in the Fall, locally grown hops are not significantly fresher than the stuff you buy from the Pacific Northwest. They're all harvested at the same time of the year (southern hemisphere notwithstanding). Local weather variations may allow them to be harvested slightly earlier or later from one year to the next but, generally speaking, the difference is not significant for our purposes.
     
  19. mountsnow1010

    mountsnow1010 Jan 23, 2009 Vermont


    Good luck getting Citra, Simcoe or Mosaic rhizomes ;)
     
    dougfur likes this.
  20. oregone

    oregone Jul 2, 2008 Oregon

    That is really interesting. I would never have guesses Simcoe and Citra to have that size production. Particularly with the clamoring (professional and amateur) for more of each. I mean, look at probrewer in the wanted section. Sooo many looking for them.
    I guess it underlines their popularity.
     
  21. oregone

    oregone Jul 2, 2008 Oregon

    And bummed that Amarillo isn't listed. That one is becoming the real rarity.
     
  22. hopfenunmaltz

    hopfenunmaltz Jun 8, 2005 Michigan

    The figure quoted at the 2011 NHC was 480 acres for Amarillo. There is said to be another farm growing Amarillo now under contract. Do not know the totals.
     
  23. OldSock

    OldSock Apr 3, 2005 District of Columbia

    I've actually heard some brewers complain that the big homebrewing suppliers have bigger contracts for Citra/Simcoe than most breweries do.
     
  24. hopfenunmaltz

    hopfenunmaltz Jun 8, 2005 Michigan

    The big suppliers ha e contracts. Don't know how the LHBS goes about getting the supplyine always has a supply of the high fans hops. Other shops run out.

    Anyone know more?
     
  25. pweis909

    pweis909 Aug 13, 2005 Wisconsin

    I grew my own for a couple seasons. My wife, an invasive plant ecology, was against my planting them in the yard. I planted them in large containers. They were a minor success but had a rough time making it through a Wisconsin winter
     
  26. mountsnow1010

    mountsnow1010 Jan 23, 2009 Vermont

    Your wife is an invasive plant?
     
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  27. VikeMan

    VikeMan Jul 12, 2009 Pennsylvania
    Beer Trader

    No, smarty. He said she is an ecology. One that contains invasive plants.
     
    mountsnow1010 and pweis909 like this.
  28. pweis909

    pweis909 Aug 13, 2005 Wisconsin

    Typo. My inner monologue and my fingers are not always in sync. Point is, she kills hops (Humulus japonicus) and other plants for a living and hates to bring her work home.
     
    mountsnow1010 likes this.
  29. OldSock

    OldSock Apr 3, 2005 District of Columbia

    It is usually the supplier (i.e., someone like LD Carlson) who has the big contract, and they supply the LHBS. Might be that some stores are reqarded for selling more. I've heard of some breweries that also run homebrewing stores syphoning off from the homebrew shop for commercial batches, shameful but true.
     
  30. VikeMan

    VikeMan Jul 12, 2009 Pennsylvania
    Beer Trader

    Wouldn't this have to be a really small brewery and/or a really big (sales-wise) homebrew store?
     
  31. hopfenunmaltz

    hopfenunmaltz Jun 8, 2005 Michigan

    Now we see the packages from HopUnion in the LHBS, and that is maybe the largest broker for the craft brewing industry. I have seen many a 11 kg box of HopUnion pellets at the LHBS. Don't know if the shops get those directly from HopUnion or from a supply house like LD Carlson.
     
  32. OldSock

    OldSock Apr 3, 2005 District of Columbia

    Certainly, even then just saving enough Citra for a special batch/cask. You're not going to make a year round beer like that.
     
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