Weissbier. Does anything else compare?

Discussion in 'Beer Talk' started by iseethewhitewhale, Jan 26, 2013.

  1. DStoked

    DStoked Sep 28, 2011 Ohio
    Beer Trader

    Well, then there must not be any. I retract my suggestion.
     
  2. steveh

    steveh Oct 8, 2003 Illinois

    Rather than be juvenile, why not try to explain the similarities (you seem to find) to us -- I double-dog dare you!
     
  3. DStoked

    DStoked Sep 28, 2011 Ohio
    Beer Trader

    Both are wheat-based, refreshing, have varying degrees of fruity/citric flavors, and lack any appreciable hoppiness. While Berliners are obviously a lot more tart, it's not a characteristic that's absent from your standard issue Weissbier.
     
  4. tai4ji2x

    tai4ji2x Aug 10, 2007 Massachusetts
    Beer Trader

    a fresh hefeweizen will still have a nice complement of noble hops.
     
  5. DStoked

    DStoked Sep 28, 2011 Ohio
    Beer Trader

    From BJCP: Hop flavor is very low to none
     
  6. malty

    malty Dec 16, 2003 Michigan

    I'd try Belgian saisons and triples, if you haven't already :)
     
    Hoppsbabo likes this.
  7. steveh

    steveh Oct 8, 2003 Illinois

    Pretty good, while far from complete. You left out that Berliner Weiß is sour, lactic, light-bodied with a thin mouthfeel while Bavarian Weizen is spicy, sweet from maltiness, carrying flavors of vanilla and banana along with spicy phenols from the distinct yeast strain and has a medium body and a medium to full body.

    Any tartness that might be found in a Bavarian Weizen is far overpowered by the sour tartness of a Berliner Weiß.

    I stand by my original statement, the 2 are far different beers -- even in any varying degree of fruit character or hop presence (and I always get a good hop balance in the nose of the Weizens I enjoy) -- let alone ingredients -- after all, Widmer uses wheat too and that produces another far different beer.

    And since you brought up the BJCP, please note the 2 distinct categories these 2 beers fall under -- straight Lambic is far closer to Berliner than Bavarian Weizen is.
     
  8. tai4ji2x

    tai4ji2x Aug 10, 2007 Massachusetts
    Beer Trader

    BJCP is for homebrewing competitions. it is a guide, not an infallible decree for actually existing beer styles. a very fresh hefeweizen will usually have lots of hop flavor and aroma.
     
  9. DStoked

    DStoked Sep 28, 2011 Ohio
    Beer Trader

    Really? Pretty sure that's how GABF is judged. And after crucifying me on the stylistic cross now you're discrediting the most widely accepted style guidelines?

    And now you're just making stuff up. I could just as easily say a very fresh Berliner won't be all that sour and tart since the bacteria hasn't done all it's work.
     
    keithmurray likes this.
  10. tai4ji2x

    tai4ji2x Aug 10, 2007 Massachusetts
    Beer Trader

    GABF is run by the BA, which grew out of papazian's homebrewer assoc. it does great work in promoting craft beer, but the style categories are totally based on american interpretations or sometimes even outright misreadings of the original beer styles and histories in their european homelands. i used to think the BJCP guidelines were gospel as well. but then very knowledgeable people from europe itself started pointing out to me the many flaws and misconceptions that are perpetrated in these supposed categorizations of their native beers.

    when i had a fresh pour of schneider edelweisse out of a huge wooden cask, i was surprised at how much noble hop character was present.
     
  11. acevenom

    acevenom Oct 7, 2011 Louisiana

    American wheat tastes of paper. :(
     
    DStoked likes this.
  12. SFACRKnight

    SFACRKnight Jan 20, 2012 Colorado
    Beer Trader

    Lagunitas called, little sumpin sumpin heard you were talking trash and boy is she pissed.
     
  13. Hoppsbabo

    Hoppsbabo Jan 29, 2012 United Kingdom (England)

    Aha. I think I know what you mean by the paper flavour. I recently tried the Uerige Weizen, albeit a German Hefeweizen, and it tasted overwhelmingly of cardboard.
     
  14. Hoppsbabo

    Hoppsbabo Jan 29, 2012 United Kingdom (England)

    Hmm, maybe I've tried this style in Korea, where I live. One of its only brewpubs makes a clean wheat beer like nothing I've had from Germany. It's very nice. However, I loves me a nice German banana bomb every once in a while.
     
    GennyCreamAle likes this.
  15. JTDay

    JTDay Jan 28, 2013 Georgia
    Beer Trader

    Aventinus is the best wheat beer I've ever had. If you can, get your hands on their 2005 vintage.
     
  16. devlishdamsel

    devlishdamsel Aug 1, 2009 Washington

    Apparently Germans like to mix their weissbier with banana nectar, lemonade and coca cola. or so ive read. I could definitely see the banana nectar bit being interesting.
     
  17. atomic

    atomic Sep 22, 2009 Illinois
    Beer Trader

    Came here to suggest this one. Probably the best dunkelweizen I've ever tried.

    Not sure what else makes it out to Australia, I highly doubt most of the american suggestions make it to you. I know SN just started getting there last year but kellerweiss isnt one of those you're getting.

    Like others have said, if you like hefeweizens you will probably like the belgian wit style; very similar. Hoegaarden is my favorite wit, probably favorite session beer full stop. For the price, its very tough to beat. St. Bernardus is another you probably get, but its MUCH more expensive, and arguably not much better. The great thing about hefe and wit beers is that even the cheaper ones will taste amazing.
     
  18. steveh

    steveh Oct 8, 2003 Illinois

    Shakin' in my boots. ;)

    To be fair, Oberon is also considered an American Pale Wheat Ale, but tastes nothing like Widmer or 312 -- and I actually enjoy it each year. It's sort of an APWA that leans to the Wit influence.
     
  19. steveh

    steveh Oct 8, 2003 Illinois

    I've seen Helles mixed with Cola (called a Diesel) or lemonade (Radler) and Berliner Weiß mixed with woodruff or raspberry juice (and my friends and I tried orange juice with the Berliner for a beer mimosa), but I've never seen Bavarian Weizen mixed with anything -- in Germany, anyway.
     
  20. YaKnowBrady

    YaKnowBrady Jul 23, 2010 New Jersey

    I came to this thread thinking "Hell no, nothing compares to Berliners!", then I was all like... :(
     
    DStoked likes this.
  21. Brunite

    Brunite Sep 21, 2009 Illinois

    Indeed. I was going to say the same thing. SN is darn good but methinks Mr. Carey has them beat. But; for the purposes of this discussion....the OP is in Australia and would never come close to NG...save for a trade. It sounds more like he is looking to find something he can get steadily.
     
  22. Stahlsturm

    Stahlsturm Mar 21, 2005 Germany

    Franziskaner etc is like suggesting Victoria Bitter to someone asking about Oz mikros...

    Face it, if you want to drink a decent Weizen you'll have to come to Bayern.
     
  23. steveh

    steveh Oct 8, 2003 Illinois

    That's it -- I'm sending you some SN Kellerweiss and New Glarus Dancing man. ;)

    (But, of course, you'll have to get someone else to drink it to compare...) :D
     
  24. SFACRKnight

    SFACRKnight Jan 20, 2012 Colorado
    Beer Trader

    I was listening to an inreview with Lagunita's head brewer this morning. He said they couldn't think of a better way to accentuate the delicate flavors of wheat than covering them up with their most aggressive dry hopping schedule. Lol.
     
    steveh likes this.
  25. Domingo

    Domingo Apr 23, 2005 Colorado
    Subscriber Beer Trader

    The only American pale wheats I’ve ever liked were the old Sierra Nevada Wheat and Odell Easy Street. Back when NB Sunshine was unfiltered it had a certain charm, too…but that has been a while. None of them are particularly amazing, but they at least have/had some character.
    I’ve never seen anyone in Bavaria tinker with any kind of syrups in their weissbier…at least beyond the Weissesbrauhaus staff telling people not to order their “Berliner” since it’s just their pale weiss with raspberry syrup.
    However Russ’n mixes likely outsell dunkel in Munich these days. I don’t mind them, and my wife genuinely loves ‘em. The really fruit-heavy ones like the Andechser do pair pretty well with Sprite in spite of what you might expect.
     
  26. smartassboiler

    smartassboiler Apr 9, 2012 Illinois
    Beer Trader

    Good call, although naming potential trade candidates can be helpful sometimes too. :)

    For me it's a tie between NG and SN's hefeweizens. Both the best US versions I've tried to date.
     
    Brunite likes this.
  27. Domingo

    Domingo Apr 23, 2005 Colorado
    Subscriber Beer Trader

    If anyone is looking for a top notch American weissbier, Dry Dock is canning theirs now and I'd expect you'll see them start to really kick up their distribution in the next year or two. It's a GABF Gold and 2-time GABF silver award winner. I'd say it has changed a tiny bit since those awards, but it's still as good as any I've had in the US and better than many Bavarian ones.
     
  28. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania

    They don’t have a wide distribution but Troegs makes a very good Hefeweizen in their Dreamweaver Wheat; that beer won the gold medal in the 2012 GABF for Category: 66 South German-Style Hefeweizen.

    Other very tasty Hefeweizen beers from SEPA:

    · Sly Fox Royal Weisse (year round)
    · Stoudt’s Heifer-in-Wheat (summer seasonal)
    · Victory Sunrise Wheat
    · Victory Mad King Weisse

    Cheers!
     
  29. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania

    FWIW, the style guidelines for the European Beer Star Awards style guidelines for a Hefeweizen states: “hop flavour and aroma are not noticeable”

    34) South GermanStyle Hefeweizen Hell
    Colour: very pale to pale amber
    Aroma and flavour: fruity and phenolic
    The phenolic characteristics are often described as clove or nutmeglike and may also be smoky or even vanillalike
    The wheat malt percentage is at least 50%
    Hopping rates are quite low, hop flavour and aroma are not noticeable
    Hefeweizen is high attenuated and shows a high carbon dioxide content
    Noticeable taste of yeast
    Full body
    No Diacetyl
    Yeast turbidity possible
    Analytics:
    Original gravity: 11.0 – 14.0 °Plato
    Apparent extract: 2.0 – 4.0 °Plato
    Alcohol: 3.7 – 4.7 % by weight, 4.6 – 5.9 % by volume
    Bitterness: 10 – 20 IBU
    Colour: < 15 EBC

    Cheers!
     
  30. steveh

    steveh Oct 8, 2003 Illinois

    First off -- in no way do I disagree with you. I can pick out (and enjoy) the hop characters in a good Weizen myself, but I think that when most BA members think of "hop character," I believe they can only think of in-your-face IPAs that knock you over the head. Too bad, too -- because they're missing out on more character than they think.
     
    tai4ji2x and JBogan like this.
  31. Domingo

    Domingo Apr 23, 2005 Colorado
    Subscriber Beer Trader

    The beer tai4ji2x mentioned, Edelweisse is now called Mein Grunes. While still classified as a Bavarian weissbier, it's intentionally an extremely hoppy one, is 6.2% ABV, and I *think* it's even using American hops. It's a bit atypical compared with the other weissbiers from the same area. That said, it's good stuff, too!
     
    DStoked likes this.
  32. herrburgess

    herrburgess Nov 4, 2009 South Carolina
    Beer Trader

    Seen Bananen-weizen, Kirsch-weizen, and Cola-weizen. http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weizenbier#Mischgetr.C3.A4nke
     
  33. JBogan

    JBogan Jul 15, 2007 Nevada

    I completely agree with you 100%. Great post!
     
  34. CellarGimp

    CellarGimp Sep 14, 2011 Missouri

    Dunkelweizen is what you should try next. Then Weizenbocks or Eisbocks. Belgian Witbiers may float your boat as well. If you are adventurous Berlinerweisse, Gose, Geuze.

    American Wheat beers. Boulevard unfiltered, etc. can be perfectly enjoyable if not expecting German complexity. Low ester and phenol flavors if any.
     
  35. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania

    Some folks might enjoy this video which compares and contrasts Weihenstephan vs. Edel-Weisse Mein Grunes.

    An 'interesting' pour technique but the idea of having the beer 'touch' the outside of the bottles is a bit of-putting to me.

    The reviewer uses the descriptor of "powdered ginger" to descrbe the Mein Grunes beer. I wonder if this is a yeast produced flavor/aroma?
     
  36. steveh

    steveh Oct 8, 2003 Illinois

  37. herrburgess

    herrburgess Nov 4, 2009 South Carolina
    Beer Trader

    Never tried one. But seen plenty -- mostly at this place in Bamberg called Stilbruch.
     
  38. Gutes_Bier

    Gutes_Bier Jul 31, 2011 Germany

    I have seen a banana weizen, actually. My wife ordered it from the local University Cafe one day. It appeared to be a mashed banana poured directly into a wheat beer. The "nectar" sinks straight to the bottom, and as far as my wife could tell, it imparted absolutely no flavor to the beer until you got to the bottom, at which point in turned into beer-flavored banana "nectar". She (a fan of beer)(and bananas) said it was gross, and I took her word for it. Not recommended on any level.
     
  39. Crusader

    Crusader Feb 4, 2011 Sweden

    I've walked past that beer in the store a number of times thinking it was just another wheat beer (not a fan), and the information on their website wouldn't suggest it being brewed with Cascade hops either (but which is mentioned on the BA page for the beer). I might just have to pick one up and try it.
     
  40. sergeantstogie

    sergeantstogie Nov 16, 2010 Washington

    Seen them all and had a Cola Weizen once. Once.
     
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