What Defines a Double IPA?

Discussion in 'Article Comments' started by BeerAdvocate, Oct 2, 2009.

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  1. BeerAdvocate

    BeerAdvocate Admin (4,017) Aug 23, 1996 Finland
    Staff Pooh-Bah

    #1 BeerAdvocate, Oct 2, 2009
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 11, 2017
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  2. Stoutmaster9

    Stoutmaster9 Initiate (0) Dec 30, 2016 California

    As far as booze potency, Extra IPAs are the missing link, at around 7%, Sierra Nevada's Torpedo being the prime example. :beer:
     
  3. EvenMoreJesus

    EvenMoreJesus Initiate (0) Jun 8, 2017 Pennsylvania

    Another article from the Wayback Machine? OK. Cool.

    ABV.

    It's the only thing that delineates the difference between the modern Pale Ale, IPA, and DIPA.
     
  4. surfcaster

    surfcaster Initiate (0) Apr 20, 2013 North Carolina
    Trader

    He left out a very important element--what the brewer wants to call it--especially when they want to avoid competing with their own beers. Lagunitas is classic for being seemingly non committal and calling most of their things an ale or pale ale.

    The CitruSinensis was called a pale ale and came in at 7.7-7.9%, Sucks was 7.8-8%. On this site, the former is pale ale and latter a DIPA. Not sure if that is BA's call or the brewery's call but certainly not much of a difference. The purists will chime in they are all "pale ales" and they are right.
     
  5. EvenMoreJesus

    EvenMoreJesus Initiate (0) Jun 8, 2017 Pennsylvania

    Missing? As in they've never existed?
     
  6. EvenMoreJesus

    EvenMoreJesus Initiate (0) Jun 8, 2017 Pennsylvania

    This is, unfortunately, a big part of the naming of things.
     
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  7. surfcaster

    surfcaster Initiate (0) Apr 20, 2013 North Carolina
    Trader

    I love SN Nevada but they are the only ones that I am aware of using that terminology. Their Celebration IPA is 6.8% (Torpedo 7.2%) and some other "benchmark" IPAs run in that 7% range--Two Hearted is prime example. My guess is that when so little was around in the late 80s, they used that to distinguish it from SNPA and Celebration and what I remember was a SN IPA (which is no longer made) as it was a little stronger than what else was out there and the DIPA was not on the radar. Seems like a historical term at this point.

    I admit that I prefer them to be "non extra" in that 6% range if possible. :wink:
     
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  8. jageraholic

    jageraholic Maven (1,378) Sep 16, 2009 Massachusetts
    Trader

    That must be old. I wasn't aware there was a place in California that didn't have IPAs or DIPAs.
     
  9. EvenMoreJesus

    EvenMoreJesus Initiate (0) Jun 8, 2017 Pennsylvania

    2009.
     
  10. Squire

    Squire Grand Pooh-Bah (3,981) Jul 16, 2015 Mississippi
    Pooh-Bah Society Trader

    Perhaps to domestic consumers 'Double' has a clearer meaning than 'Doppelbock'.
     
  11. nw2571

    nw2571 Initiate (0) Feb 26, 2017 Indiana

    "You’ll want to aim for between 7 and 9 percent. More, and you risk creating something less drinkable"

    Hahaha, that's so 2009 of you... (As I sip a 120 min)
     
  12. JimmyCarlBlack

    JimmyCarlBlack Initiate (0) Oct 26, 2014 New Hampshire

    Of course, this has evolved into a big marketing morass and beers are whatever the brewer and/or marketing department wants to call them.

    BUT...

    "Double" IPA is one of the most misunderstood terms. It's now run away with itself and people are expanding on the theme and creating "triple" IPA. But, to all those who say that Double IPA and Imperial IPA are the same thing – you are even more correct than most of you know. It's not just that they're the same beer called by two different names – they are (or were) THE SAME NAME. When Imperial IPAs were first introduced (a relatively recent phenomenon in the long history of beer), the name was often shortened (especially on chalkboard menus) to "IIPA." When *speaking* (not writing), many people would pronounce this as "double-I P A" (the same way people say "N double-A C P" for the NAACP or "N C double-A" for the NCAA). The "double" had NOTHING to do with the amount of hops (yes, they do have more hops, but that's NOT what the "double" is referring to), it merely had to do with the double I's. Saying two of the same vowels in a row can sound awkward, which is why many people choose the "double-[vowel]" route when speaking. So, the term should only ever be spoken and not written (just as one always writes NCAA and never NC Double A).

    Of course, it's gotten so out of hand and so far removed from its source that you will now see even brewers who don't understand this and label their beers as Double IPA/DIPA... but it's still wrong.
     
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  13. EvenMoreJesus

    EvenMoreJesus Initiate (0) Jun 8, 2017 Pennsylvania

    This is all well and good, but does not explain why Imperial Stouts are also called Double Stouts.
     
  14. Squire

    Squire Grand Pooh-Bah (3,981) Jul 16, 2015 Mississippi
    Pooh-Bah Society Trader

    Cause for some folks math is hard.
     
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  15. jageraholic

    jageraholic Maven (1,378) Sep 16, 2009 Massachusetts
    Trader

    I only know of one and thats from Green Flash
     
  16. EvenMoreJesus

    EvenMoreJesus Initiate (0) Jun 8, 2017 Pennsylvania

    Just Google "Double Stout" and click on images. This is what you get.
     
  17. bella1956

    bella1956 Initiate (0) Feb 19, 2018 Pennsylvania

    The only thing I can think of is the higher alcohol content and usually more intense flavors because of the extra hops added. 8% ABV is my cut off point for being a double ipa as opposed to a pale ale or a regular ipa
     
  18. EvenMoreJesus

    EvenMoreJesus Initiate (0) Jun 8, 2017 Pennsylvania

    Your lower end cutoff?
     
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  19. bella1956

    bella1956 Initiate (0) Feb 19, 2018 Pennsylvania

    yes lower end, even though some 7.5 ABV
     
  20. jesskidden

    jesskidden Grand Pooh-Bah (3,071) Aug 10, 2005 New Jersey
    Pooh-Bah Society Trader

    Hmmm... that's not the modern history of Double/Imperial IPAs according to Mitch Steele's IPA book, which I referred to in a recent post about the same topic (and naming theory), as well as other usages of "Imperial" in nineteenth century United States for both UK- and US-brewed ales.
     
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