What food are you eating now?

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by HorseheadsHophead, Nov 2, 2020.

  1. BeastOfTheNortheast

    BeastOfTheNortheast Zealot (527) Dec 26, 2009 Pennsylvania

    Thank you! Love Indian cuisine and my wife’s sister lives up there. Will have to get some.
     
  2. riptorn

    riptorn Devotee (448) Apr 26, 2018 North Carolina
    Trader

    Not eating this yet, but probably in the next day or two and am interested in input. I've heard/read it tastes like chicken and can be prepared in much the same way.
    Also interested in learning good ways to get them ready for storage and how to store them.
    Chicken of the woods mushrooms (@cavedave)

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    My buddy who harvested them sauteed some with butter, soy, honey, and added it to tacos with typical taco stuff (peppers, tomato, guac, etc.)
     
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  3. cavedave

    cavedave Poo-Bah (3,038) Mar 12, 2009 New York
    Society Trader

    Nice find. Everyone's spots did well this year. Except mine. Hardly complaining, it was a record setting year for foraging of all kinds, Chicken of the Woods hardly missed by me, truth told. You can use it any way you normally would use chicken, I find it is best saute'd with vegetables, or with tempura batter and fried. It is one of the few mushrooms that freezes fairly well without pre cooking, just sliced fairly thin, but I always cook mine first, or at least blanche, before putting into vac bags and freezer. When I find a bunch I usually trim one or two inches from the edge and leave the rest in the woods, the edges are definitely superior to the rest. Sounds like your friend did a great job with the preparations used. One hint (in a post already overlong)- if you haven't eaten that variety before, eat a small amount first time and see how you handle it next day. COW is one that some people have digestive problems.
     
  4. riptorn

    riptorn Devotee (448) Apr 26, 2018 North Carolina
    Trader

    Thanks for the tips about storage and especially about potential discomfort. If I was unknowingly one of those susceptible and ate a bate right off the bat and felt badly, I'd be rife with anxiety.
    I'm one who is cautious to a fault (or to survival) with wild mushrooms. If I can't positively ID them as being safe (or get confirmation from someone who can), I don't even want to touch them.
     
  5. not2quick

    not2quick Defender (625) Dec 1, 2015 Missouri
    Society Trader

    Nice score! I have an oak tree in my yard that gives me a big cluster of sulpher shelf chicken of the woods. My backyard spits out chanterelles every year and a small stroll through the woods, I have a hill that produces black trumpets.

    If I can only gets some morels to pop up around the homestead....
     
  6. cavedave

    cavedave Poo-Bah (3,038) Mar 12, 2009 New York
    Society Trader

    Mycophobia is the name for fear of mushrooms, seems to be much more prevalent in America than in Europe, especially eastern Europe. Good to be careful, there are mushrooms out there that can kill you, and ones that make you wish you were dead. Laetiporous sulphureus is the binomial name of this variety, and it is one of the four varieties listed as most safe for beginners to pick. All mushrooms should be well cooked, as they have varying amounts of chitin in them that breaks down from cooking. Forgot to mention, do not dry COW unless it is to make powder for soup base, it dries poorly texture-wise. Enjoy!
    Keep an eye on that oak, COW is a parasite that causes brown rot.
     
  7. SFACRKnight

    SFACRKnight Poo-Bah (1,891) Jan 20, 2012 Colorado
    Society Trader

    I made some ropa vieja in the old instant pot last night. Did not dissappoint..
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  8. Beer_Economicus

    Beer_Economicus Defender (664) Apr 8, 2017 Ohio
    Trader

    Just found this thread, and loving it. I promise to take photos in the future.

    Tonight I made meatball sandwhiches (homemade meatballs, store-bought French baguettes), but on Monday I made approx. 10 lbs of braised short ribs with 3 pounds of porcini mushrooms. Hate the time, but love the result. I have a 16qt cast iron dutch oven that, to me, is essential for dishes like this. Sometime soon I really should make coq au vin. on Saturday I'll be making rabbit daube.
     
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  9. MrOH

    MrOH Poo-Bah (1,790) Jul 5, 2010 Malta
    Society

    A buddy of mine who is chef/owner of a highly regarded restaurant in the Poconos has them on the menu fried like chicken
     
  10. Beer_Economicus

    Beer_Economicus Defender (664) Apr 8, 2017 Ohio
    Trader

    For Lunch: An Oktoberfest holdover. These German mustards are fantastic, as is this sauerkraut. Huge sauerkraut fan. Love the acidity normally, but this has very little acidity to it and subsequently I could probably sit down with the jar and a fork and eat the whole damn thing.

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  11. Beer_Economicus

    Beer_Economicus Defender (664) Apr 8, 2017 Ohio
    Trader

    Alright, I'm back for the Rabbit Daube. For those that don't know, daube is a classic Provencal dish - basically a stew. Being that it is french, Daube rears its' head frequently in Louisiana cooking. My wife is a native, and I'm what I call to call "adopted cajun." I could live on cajun food, and I'd try if not for my wife asking for variety. Anyway, a daube can be made with any protein, this one just happens to use Rabbit. Most Daube's are a very lightly thickened braised protein dish, either thickened 'naturally' with the use of bones or with a small amount of flour. They also usually use a small amount of tomatoes, which may perhaps separate it from other "rice and gravy" dishes of cajun tradition.

    For those that are unacquainted, "rice and gravy" is at the heart of cajun cooking, and can be made from literally anything. Often after frying up a pork chop they will add onion, and then deglaze with water and make a 'gravy'. Gravy is cajun (used liberally in a rather utilitarian way) for basically any pan-made liquid regardless of how thin or thick it is. Rice is then an essential component of seemingly every dish, and soaks up the gravy nicely.

    Here's my 16qt pot (for scale):

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    Searing the rabbit in rendered bacon fat and good olive oil:

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    Seared Rabbit:

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    My mirepoix of onion, carrot, celery and garlic:

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    And finally, the end result (after meat has been removed from the bone, and some baby rainbow carrots were added, and the meat braised for 4 hours):

    [​IMG]
     
  12. LesDewitt4beer

    LesDewitt4beer Zealot (561) Jan 25, 2021 Minnesota
    Society

    Homemade white chicken chili. Homegrown hot peppers, sea salt and some spicy cheese really make this a mover. Cheers!
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