What’s the Difference? Share your Side-by-Side.

Discussion in 'Beer Talk' started by jonphisher, Jan 16, 2021.

  1. jonphisher

    jonphisher Devotee (429) Aug 9, 2015 New Jersey
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    I always thoroughly enjoy everyone’s side by side tastings, I enjoy doing them too. I mentioned this idea in a NBW thread a ways back and @cjgiant, who tends to post lots of side by sides, commented on it and mentioned he may start a thread. We talked with each other and added some discussion we finally decided to give it a shot. Hopefully there's some interest, but this is meant to be just a thread to throw out your side-by-sides.

    What's a side-by-side?
    Well, simply, it's having two (or more) beers together and comparing/contrasting them. It can take any reasoning: beers you think are similar, verticals (differences in aging and makeup), brewery-produced variants, just because, hype vs shelf beef, fresh vs older, import vs local, etc. blind or not blind, all welcome.

    What we thought would be good to include?
    • the name and brewer of both beers (makes this thread more searchable)
    • why did you decide to try these two beers together?
    • what did you find out, i.e. What's the Difference?
    • if you had expectations or guesses were you surprised by the results?

    That's really about it. You can provide a near play-by-play of each sip, or just give the executive summary. Pictures are always nice, but a thousand words is a valid substitute, I hear (kidding).

    @tasterschoice62 thanks for the gbot heady one, that prompted this post as well as @StonedRaider with the stone vs wookie jack one, saw both of yours recently as well and it reminded me of this thread idea.

    Anyhow, hopefully there is some interest in this, if not oh well, figured it was worth a shot. The worst that happens it gets buried after our first few posts, just wanted to see if it was worth a try. I will post one shortly...
     
  2. jonphisher

    jonphisher Devotee (429) Aug 9, 2015 New Jersey
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    The idea for this one stemmed from Jever continuing to get mentioned in the Weihenstephaner Helles thread. Freshness came up a lot as it tends to with imports, so I decided to take a 6 month old Jever (7.20.20 bottling) and compare it to a fresh favorite local pils of my double nickel pilsner (11.10.20 canned), german, so it was a good comparison. The goal here was to see just how well an import holds up when compared to a great local fresh example, both same price, 11 a six pack. I went blind cause I thought the pours would give it away I was wrong, it may have messed me up more cause I thought Jever was lighter, nope...picture was taken after notes, notes were blind black glass.

    [​IMG]

    Aroma

    After smelling both my initial reaction was the left was a little muted. But noticeable difference was that the right had a sweet citrusy, little floral, grassy thing going on while the left was mostly grassy and spicy.

    Taste
    Left was prominent grass and spice mostly where as the right had a crackerness to it along with lemon like citrus note to it, grassy too but way less so.

    Mouthfeel
    Left was super clean and dry with a nice bitterness to it, the right side was a little sweeter, less bitter (or less noticeable cause of sweetness) still clean and dry but it definitely lingered longer than the other one.

    I was fairly certain by mouthfeel which was which, simply because the mouthfeel of the left was just begging for sip after sip, a trait i love of the beer on the left, the bitterness also helped.

    Appearance
    After the fact I poured to compare they almost look and pour identical though Jever was surprisingly a bit darker, picture is very accurate. I would've guessed it would've been lighter, nope.

    No winners or losers here, both beers are amazing and good in their own right. I was surprised though that still at 6 months Jever was still noticeably cleaner and crisper than its counterpoint. No surprise that the fresher one had a lot more aroma. But it was very surprising how crisp, clean and drinkable a 6 month old German beer was. Both great beers and I’m happy I can have the best of both worlds.
     
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  3. TongoRad

    TongoRad Poo-Bah (2,860) Jun 3, 2004 New Jersey
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    Great idea and good job kicking things off! I really hope this thread takes off.
     
  4. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (4,881) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
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    FWIW I am not at all surprised at what you posted here. Jever, even when fresher than 6 months, does not have prominent hop aroma. But even with some time it still is very crisp and clean. The feature of Jever, which I have discussed in many posts, is that it is bone dry.

    I have had Double Nickle several times, and I have enjoyed it every time, but not exactly a favorite for my palate. But we all have our own unique palates.

    As I am sure you recall I have posted a lot of side by side tastings in the NBS/NBW threads. A fairly recent post was concerning German Pilsners:

    [​IMG]

    https://www.beeradvocate.com/community/threads/new-beer-weekend-21.651977/#post-7116379

    Cheers!
     
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  5. jonphisher

    jonphisher Devotee (429) Aug 9, 2015 New Jersey
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    Your frequent side by sides are always enjoyable to read. I looked for that Bavarian pils too, never found it sadly.

    Thanks, hopefully some good discussion comes of it.
     
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  6. cjgiant

    cjgiant Poo-Bah (5,386) Jul 13, 2013 District of Columbia
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    No, there was no coordination at all. I just happened to have a side-by-side all lined up for tonight.... :smirk:

    Actually, I did mention this a week and a half ago, so let's get at it...
    [​IMG]

    So for those who didn't want to click the link, I hadn't had Great Divide Hibernation in a while, and have been quite enjoying it. It's bitterness reminded me more of an American barley wine than the Old Ale, and when American barley wines come up, so does the comparison beer: Sierra Nevada Bigfoot.

    So, I don't expect them to be that similar, but I'm curious on what is similar given my thoughts that night oh so many days ago.

    So, Hibernation is darker and therefore less clear, but also has a better head (granted, the Bigfoot is 5-6 years old, but it needs some time to mellow, no?)

    There's more chocolate in the Hibernation nose, especially to the hops in Bigfoot. The Bigfoot is actually more sweet smelling, despite the hops I know are coming.

    Taste brings things closer together - though Hibernation bitterness seems to be a combination of the more roasted malt and hops, where Bigfoot seems all hop-driven.

    Overall, the sweet (and more barleywine-esque, to me) note from Bogfoot's nose is drowned by the bittering hops in the taste. Given the comparison, Hibernation seems more a bareleywine/stout hybrid, so old ale probably does fit, given the style seems to be more rooted in production than outcome.

    So, I thought Hibernation leaned more ABW, and found out that maybe it doesn't so much. I am enjoying both on their own, regardless (and though I've been iffy on Bigfoot in the past, I'm enjoying it a tad more tonight).

    Cheers, all! I hope you guys and gals consider using this thread for fun and exploration, even if you are more succinct than my wordy ass :slight_smile:


    Bonus round: I gave the GF the beers blind, and she called them correctly. She liked Hibernation as Bigfoot was "less drinkable" and seemingly higher in ABV (after looking up, she was right, but she thought there'd be larger than a 1% difference). As such, she liked Hibernation better as "more drinkable" to her.
     
    #6 cjgiant, Jan 16, 2021
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2021
  7. cjgiant

    cjgiant Poo-Bah (5,386) Jul 13, 2013 District of Columbia
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    Nicely done. I love the dark glasses, I might need to find something like that for my own lunacy of blind tasting. :grinning:
     
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  8. jonphisher

    jonphisher Devotee (429) Aug 9, 2015 New Jersey
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    I love them, it’s pretty shocking how much we taste with our eyes. I’ve been surprised many times cause of these glasses.
     
  9. ovaltine

    ovaltine Poo-Bah (3,438) Apr 6, 2010 Indiana
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    Okay, you just added some complexity to my NBW choices for this weekend. I gotta noodle on this a bit.

    PS: this is a FANTASTIC idea for a thread. Well done.
     
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  10. ovaltine

    ovaltine Poo-Bah (3,438) Apr 6, 2010 Indiana
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    You are the king of the side-by-side, Jack. I love when you do these in NBS/NBW, and I really appreciate that a lot of the time, in my recollection, you choose a couple of lagers/pilsners. You are an OG beer nerd of the highest magnitude, IMHO.
     
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  11. ovaltine

    ovaltine Poo-Bah (3,438) Apr 6, 2010 Indiana
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    Okay, this thread is showing PHENOMENAL potential - this is an inspired selection of beers.

    Wow. Just wow.
     
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  12. jonphisher

    jonphisher Devotee (429) Aug 9, 2015 New Jersey
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    Thank you! I was hesitant to post so close to NBW but it was Friday and I had those two in the fridge it felt right. Could always save side by side for midweek to not affect NBW. :beers:
     
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  13. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (4,881) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
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    Spoiler alert: In a week (or two) I will be discussing a side-by-side of two Saisons. One will be a new to me commercial beer and the other will be my latest homebrewed Saison.

    Cheers!
     
  14. o29

    o29 Initiate (77) Sep 29, 2020 Texas
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    This is an awesome idea for a thread thread!

    Recently I was inspired to try a SN Celebration/Torpedo blind side-by-side this past year after reading on some thread here that another poster found than more similar than expected. I also found them similar, though I was still able to correctly guess which was which, though with a 50/50 shot that's not saying that much.

    It was definitely an enjoyable exercise though that I wish I had shared here, so I look forward to conducting more "experiments" and contributing to this post in the future!

    I got surprisingly good head formation from a 2011 Bigfoot that I opened a week or so ago, so that's interesting that yours appears to have poured with significantly less.

    [​IMG]
     
    #14 o29, Jan 16, 2021
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2021
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  15. cjgiant

    cjgiant Poo-Bah (5,386) Jul 13, 2013 District of Columbia
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    I always find rating look can be weird on a single beer - I've totally had different results within a six pack, which could very easily point to me/my glasses more than the beer.

    That said, I feel that what I poured had no chance of looking like yours. I await your next chance to post in this thread. Cheers!
     
  16. Billet

    Billet Devotee (478) Dec 17, 2013 Michigan
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    I just did a side by side comparison yesterday with Sam Adams Boston Lager and Alaskan Amber. It started as a blind taste test, but I was easily able to identify each one.

    The Boston Lager had a lighter malt backbone and was decidedly more hop forward. The Alaskan Amber had a stronger malt flavor without being overly sweet. The Amber had an interesting flavor that I could not identify where the Lager had a more traditional flavor. Both beers had a very clean flavor, not a single note out of place.

    I considered them to be roughly equal in quality, both excellent, but the styles were enough different that I could not pick a true winner of this round.
     
  17. GOBLIN

    GOBLIN Meyvn (1,229) Mar 3, 2013 Ohio
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    Great idea !!!
     
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  18. jonphisher

    jonphisher Devotee (429) Aug 9, 2015 New Jersey
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    That’s a good one I’ve actually never had Alaskan Amber, they don’t make it out here.

    Amber lager vs ale is a good idea, I recently did a similar lager vs ale with a 4% black lager and 4% stout both from the same brewery. I did blind as well and I had the same result as you “the styles were different enough.” Also agree that both were great beers that I enjoyed a lot. Thanks for sharing.
     
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  19. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (4,881) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
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    Was there a feature(s) that distinguished one from the other?

    A couple of years ago I had a Czech Dark Lager from a small, local brewery and while I enjoyed drinking it I could not shake the 'feeling' that I was drinking a Stout/Porter. I will relate later what the 'it' factor was for me here.

    Cheers!
     
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  20. jonphisher

    jonphisher Devotee (429) Aug 9, 2015 New Jersey
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    Yes @JackHorzempa the stout had noticeably more hop presence, as well as a lasting finish. They both share a similar roast profile but what was interesting about the side by side was how much the hops came out in the stout. When drank alone it was not as noticeable but next to the lager it very much stood out.
     
  21. zid

    zid Meyvn (1,267) Feb 15, 2010 New York
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    Side-by-sides are very revealing but they also will influence and alter how you taste/perceive a particular beer. A beer in a comparison tasting can taste quite different when had on its own or in a different side-by-side... and in my opinion, that’s very important to keep in mind.

    I absolutely love blind comparison tastings, but I’m actually not a fan of doing them with just two beers. I find (at least) three beers to be much better because it adds more opportunity for juxtapositions. The added chaos compared to a more straightforward A vs B helps to reduce the guessing game aspect as well - I find that I'm less concerned with simply identifying the beers when there are more of them.

    Given what I mentioned at the top, when you do a side-by-side with only two beers, you are only able to experience each beer within a single rigid framework (A vs B). Use three beers and constantly shift the order you try them... and you can now shift things around to A vs B, A vs C, and B vs C... and doing so allows you to experience each beer through shifting juxtapositions rather than a single static one. With how easily something can be chameleon-like, this is very important for me. I'm also a big fan of repeating tastings but mixing them up slightly.
     
  22. zid

    zid Meyvn (1,267) Feb 15, 2010 New York
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    That sounds more like a difference between two beers rather than a difference between two "styles" or processes.

    Somewhat related: The last time I did a blind side-by-side with dark lagers and ales from two different breweries, the differences in tone between the two breweries was greater than the differences between the lagers and ales.
     
  23. jonphisher

    jonphisher Devotee (429) Aug 9, 2015 New Jersey
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    What was noticeably different as well was the clean dry finish in the lager. I mean it was obvious on the first sip, the stout lingered presently the lager came and went.

    On your post above that I agree with what you said. For me that’s why I enjoy side by side, to experience the beers in respects to each other. The rigid framework you mention is why I so much like just two and not more. Any time I’ve attempted more it becomes harder for me personally to pick up on things, which could be they point, depending on the goal of the comparison. I like two because it amplifies differences and similarities for me. I know someone, maybe @TongoRad mentioned mixing A B together to make beer C. Never done that, maybe time to consider...
     
  24. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (4,881) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
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    Interesting, I was not expecting that aspect but in today's craft beer scene things can be quite 'different'.
    And in my opinion this should be a discriminator but I am not too surprised in reading this statement. In my opinion US craft breweries sometimes (often?) have too much of a roast character when brewing their Black Lagers (e.g.,Schwarzbiers). It seems like they have the thought process that these beers need 'more' to be exciting? For the situation of the Czech Dark Lager I discussed previously that small, local craft brewery used too much dark roast malt in brewing that beer, but again just my opinion.

    Cheers!
     
  25. Sheppard

    Sheppard Meyvn (1,422) Mar 16, 2013 Virginia
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    Thanks for starting this thread. I love doing side by sides and I'm looking forward to contributing to this thread.
     
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  26. TongoRad

    TongoRad Poo-Bah (2,860) Jun 3, 2004 New Jersey
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    [​IMG]

    Yup, I do find that if you're doing a blind tasting on your own adding the blended 'mystery' beer is the best way to go. Otherwise your brain will tend to be running a subroutine trying to guess which beer is which; and then you never know if you're subconsciously giving more weight to certain aspects or not due to the fact that you sort of know which is which. By introducing the blend I've actually surprised myself numerous times.
     
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  27. Urk1127

    Urk1127 Poo-Bah (1,852) Jul 2, 2014 New Jersey
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    Thank you. I love for these. I also never realized how visually similar double nickel was to Germany. It’s a fantastic Pilsner I think is a touch too american type hoppy but still love it. I’ll join in later
     
  28. Urk1127

    Urk1127 Poo-Bah (1,852) Jul 2, 2014 New Jersey
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    Is this the same Von Trapp Pilsner in their yellow can ?
     
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  29. PapaGoose03

    PapaGoose03 Poo-Bah (2,908) May 30, 2005 Michigan
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    I think my only side-by-sides have been comparing a BA beer that's been in my cellar for 3-5 years to a current version of the same beer in an attempt to determine what aging can do to a beer. I think I've done it 2-3 times but I don't recall which beers I used. These comparisons caused me to decide to give up cellaring, or at least call it 'creating a stash' for spread-out consumption instead of 'cellaring'. I could always distinguish taste differences between beers during the comparisons, but I didn't have any appreciation for the taste of the older versions.
     
  30. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (4,881) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
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    The short answer is no. The Von Trapp Pilsner in the yellow can is what they market as being a Bohemian Pilsner.

    The longer answer:

    Since we are discussing side-by-side taste testing it turns out I discussed the Von Trapp Bohemain Pilsner in a past NBS thread alongside Pilsner Urquell:

    [​IMG]

    FWIW I was not a big fan of Von Trapp Bohemian Pilsner:

    "Von Trapp Bohemian Pilsner: I enjoyed drinking this beer but the caramel-like flavor is not exactly thrilling for my personal palate. I am thinking that with more exposure (drinking) of this beer it will ‘evolve’ into a favorite? I strongly suspect that this is the sort of beer that would ‘grow’ on me."

    https://www.beeradvocate.com/community/threads/new-beer-sunday-week-592.429644/#post-4861931

    I posted that above verbiage in 2016 and I never did give the Von Trapp Bohemian Pilsner another 'chance'. Just too many locally brewed high quality Pilsners available to me, that I like, for me to be motivated to buy Von Trapp Bohemian Pilsner again. In contrast I will buy Von Trapp Bavarian Pilsner again if I ever see it on the shelf of a local beer retailer.

    Cheers!
     
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  31. Urk1127

    Urk1127 Poo-Bah (1,852) Jul 2, 2014 New Jersey
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    Unrelated to the Von Trapp funnily enough I prefer other Czech beers over Urquell because no matter the format bottles or cans it is too buttery for me every time
     
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  32. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (4,881) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
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    I am pretty sensitive to diacetyl (buttery flavor) but I personally do not pick it up in the bottled/canned PU beers I have bought. I did once pick it up in a draft pint from a local craft beer bar.

    When I was visiting the Czech Republic for a two week vacation in 2019 I did pick up diacetyl beer in the Tankovna pubs in Prague. Below is an extract from an article that I wrote and will be published soon:

    "My least favorite topic: diacetyl

    During the fermentation process all yeast strains (both ale and lager) create a chemical compound called diacetyl. In most cases this diacetyl will be further processed by the yeast into other compounds later in the fermentation process. For most beer styles a perceptible level of diacetyl in the beer is considered a technical brewing flaw. An exception is for Bohemian Pilsner. The BJCP (Beer Judge Certification Program) Style Guidelines states: “Light to moderate diacetyl…are acceptable, but need not be present.” Well the words “light” vs. “moderate” can be quite subjective. There is also the aspect that perceptible diacetyl, which tastes like butter to my palate, may be OK for some folks and undesirable for others (e.g., me). During my recent (2019) two week visit to the Czech Republic (Prague, Pilsen) I drank many draft half-liters of Bohemian Pilsners but the only beer I sometimes had issues with was Pilsner Urquell and principally when at Tankovna Pubs which served Pilsner Urquell directly from tanks within the pub. When I visited the Pilsner Urquell brewery to take a tour I asked the tour guide about this topic. She recognized this situation but since she was not a brewer she had no answer to why there was variability here.

    I much preferred the Bohemian Pilsners that had no perceptible levels of diacetyl."

    Cheers!
     
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  33. TongoRad

    TongoRad Poo-Bah (2,860) Jun 3, 2004 New Jersey
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    Speaking of direct comparisons and diacetyl, last fall I was drinking a lot of OEC Coolship Lager, essentially a Czech style pils. I never really noticed the presence of diacetyl in it, so it must have been at barely perceptible levels. That was until I had a can to follow a really clean pils one night (either Dovetail or Heater Allen, I can't quite remember), and then it hit me like a ton of bricks.
     
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  34. Urk1127

    Urk1127 Poo-Bah (1,852) Jul 2, 2014 New Jersey
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    When I had Czechvar I could not taste it at all but side by side with Urquell, some PU bottles were un drinkable to me which is odd because I like Czech pils more than German but since then I lean toward German the butter makes me feel sick
     
    #34 Urk1127, Jan 16, 2021
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2021
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  35. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (4,881) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
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    This beer is branded as Budweiser Budvar in the Czech Republic and I had many draft ½ liters of this beer at the U Medvidku Pub (a Tankovna Pub) in Prague. I never once perceived diacetyl in any of those beers.

    Cheers!
     
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  36. cjgiant

    cjgiant Poo-Bah (5,386) Jul 13, 2013 District of Columbia
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    Ok, so I happened to have bought two new dark lagers at the beer store yesterday. In this case, I have no idea how close they should be, as one in a Czech dark lager and the other just says "dark lager" although it also mentions Kveik so that would likely be one difference. Also, instead of doing a straight side-by-side with them, I decided to throw in another beer that I think might stand out, but who knows?

    I guess I will shortly, as I asked the GF to set up a blind tasting of Aslin's Full Basic dark Czech lager, Non Sequitur Beer Porject's Black is Beautiful black Kviek lager (listed as a Schwarzbier on Untappd) and Parkway's Raven's Roost, a Baltic porter. I have had before many times.
    [​IMG]

    The recap:
    • All beers, to the surprise of no one, I'd guess, had the core roasted malt note, with Beer B standing out a bit with some extra sweetness
    • Beer B was the most unique in flavor, while Beer A was most unique in smell
    • Beers B and C had vaguely similar noses, including some generic fruitiness
    • Beers A and C had more fruity openings, though Beer C seemed to lose it with warmth, and Beer B seemed to have lost it from the nose
    • Beer C had a nose of chocolate, but Beer B showed the most chocolate of the three in the flavor
    Beer B was most enjoyable tonight, but it was a bit heavier than I expected from any of the beers. Next I had Beer A over Beer C initially, but Beer C became more enjoyable with warmth.

    Although it wasn't my goal to guess, In my thoughts on which beer was which, I wasn't sure if B was the stronger brew (Raven's Roost is 7.1%, the other two were 5%) or Aslin's beer based on experience with they're heavier beers. Either way, I figured beer C was the Kveik beer.

    I was wrong. The most enjoyable brew tonight went to Aslin's dark Czech lager (B). My surprise of the tasting is that Raven's Roost (C) - an admittedly lighter Baltic porter, but one I quite enjoy - started out a bit weak.

    So I mixed the last sips of all three and this mix fell into the same category as most times I do it - not an improvement on any of the beers individually. The notes from Aslin's beer seemed to stick out from the others, and the mix thinned it out, but it also neutralized the flavors of all beers.
     
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  37. Urk1127

    Urk1127 Poo-Bah (1,852) Jul 2, 2014 New Jersey
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    A side by side of Shiner Bock and Yuengling Traditional Lager. There is a current thread of Yuengling expanding territory thru Molson and there is a side discussion in there about moving into Shiner territory so here is a side by side with shocking results you could say. I did not do this blind as I wanted the pour and color in here
    [​IMG]

    yuengling traditional lager (amber) 4.5%. PA
    Shiner Bock. (Bock) 4.4% TX

    Looks: both beers pour a variation of amber. You’re talking a difference of 5> SRM, not even. Shiner Bock comes in a touch darker shade in body and foam. Both beers were poured with vigor

    Smell: Yuengling has an earth, dirt quality to it in comparison to the Shiner being just a touch less hop profile. Woodsy hops of the noble character can be picked up in both with dry toast being a major characteristic. Difference being that the Yuengling is a bit more hoppy in terms of scent. That’s it.

    Taste: well now. The best way I can put it is this. Yuengling is earthy. I’d call it rustic. There’s an old school touch here. Hope are perfectly balanced with a medium body. A chunky finish with moderate carbonation......Shiner Bock has such a subtle amount more sweetness that is is noticeable. Similar profile in terms of flavor but shiner bock has this plain oatmeal type of sweetness to it. You can’t even really call it sweet. With a smooth low carbonation shiner bock is a much cleaner and softer beer.

    feel: as stated, shiner both is the cleaner and softer of the two beers with seemingly less carbonation than Yuengling.

    overall: two very similar beers and I wouldn’t even classify shiner bock as a Bock but as an amber just as Yuengling lager because it does not follow guidelines for abv and is simply not as hearty as yuengling ( an American amber). There are a couple differences. Yuengling is heartier also with a touch more hop in flavor. Maybe even an English yeast? Something unique here but nothing crazy. Shiner Bock is much cleaner especially in the finish, smoother carbonation although low and just a tiny bit sweeter. Blindfolded the only way I’d think you could tell is the feel of this beer.

    overall these beers have a lot in common and I do not think Shiner needs to worry about losing fans as they are similar but different enough to tell the difference. The mouthfeel of the beers has the largest impact on me.

    Cheers!!!

    @JackHorzempa
    @nc41 @YamBag @Ranbot @zid @EmperorBatman @dennisthreeninefiveone
     
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  38. TongoRad

    TongoRad Poo-Bah (2,860) Jun 3, 2004 New Jersey
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    I think this is exactly the right comparison for Shiner, and you'd be doing it a disservice by comparing it to a Continental Bock if you did. The old-school American Bock substyle (which is what it is) is actually a beefed-up AAL. I came of age at the tail end of that era, and do remember that they were more of a thing in the 70s and precious few have survived to this date; Shiner being one of them. It's probably no coincidence that as Lite beers ascended American Bocks went by the wayside; the majority of drinkers wanting less character in their beers drove that market.
     
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  39. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (4,881) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
    Society

    A very nice side-by-side tasting.

    If you are so motivated you might want to compare one of these beers (or both?) with Genny Bock which should be coming out shortly.

    Genny Bock is my favorite AAAL beer but I would be very interested in hearing your thoughts here.

    Cheers to you!
     
  40. Urk1127

    Urk1127 Poo-Bah (1,852) Jul 2, 2014 New Jersey
    Society

    I will do my best to find this. If I can not find it then I will ask if my job can order it. I’d say I am a traditionalist so I did not go into this tasting expecting Shiner to be a “real” bock and shiner and yuengling are so similar it was surprising. Cheers