ABV

Discussion in 'Homebrewing' started by BaalDagon, Sep 10, 2014.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. BaalDagon

    BaalDagon Initiate (0) Jul 17, 2014 Tennessee

    Without getting UBER technical, since my skills aren't that technical yet, is brewing a high ABV content brew simply a matter of adding more sugar and in what form?
     
  2. ssam

    ssam Aspirant (292) Dec 2, 2008 California

    As long as the yeast can handle it, more fermentables (sugar) will lead to more alcohol. You can achieve this by using more malt, or you can use sugar in almost any other form: honey, brown sugar, rock candy, regular table sugar, etc. Depending on which you use you may get some flavor or texture contributions. Regular table sugar is 100% fermentable so it makes alcohol and leaves nothing else behind. But if its not balanced your beer might end up being too dry and/or thin.
     
    #2 ssam, Sep 10, 2014
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2014
  3. Eriktheipaman

    Eriktheipaman Savant (952) Sep 4, 2010 California

    100% correct. To clarify though as to not confuse the OP, almost all alcohol in beer is derived from sugar extracted from malted barely. Many beers use Wheat, Oats, and Rye but for sake of simplification let's just say it's mostly Barley.

    Some beers do use simplified sugars such as table sugar, but it's usually a very small percentage of the alcohol contributed.
     
    BaalDagon likes this.
  4. ronobvious2

    ronobvious2 Initiate (0) Aug 24, 2010 Tennessee

    For the Pliny clone I'm brewing now, they have you dump a heckuva lot of corn sugar in there to bump up the alcohol. .75lbs if I remember right. I guess they do this to better balance the massive amount of hops?
     
    BaalDagon likes this.
  5. VikeMan

    VikeMan Poo-Bah (1,948) Jul 12, 2009 Pennsylvania
    Society

    I'd say they do that to get the desired ABV without making the beer cloying. i.e. think of simple sugars in a DIPA as replacing some base malt in order to thin the body (comparatively), rather than as adding to a base that was already set. But if you are asking if DIPAs have high ABV to balance against large hop bitterness/flavor/aroma, I suppose you could say that.
     
    BaalDagon likes this.
  6. ronobvious2

    ronobvious2 Initiate (0) Aug 24, 2010 Tennessee

    New word to me, and I get what you're saying. Instead of adding more malt and making the beer taste thick like a syrup, just add a simple sugar to bump up the ABV. I wonder how it would be though if I made this kit again without the extra sugar. Just less boozy I guess, which is fine with me.
     
    BaalDagon likes this.
  7. cmmcdonn

    cmmcdonn Initiate (188) Jun 21, 2009 Virginia

    The "boozy" descriptor may also be from a technical flaw (i.e. fermenting too warm) and not related to the simple sugar.
     
    BaalDagon likes this.
  8. langdonk1

    langdonk1 Initiate (0) May 16, 2014 South Carolina

    Yeah fermentation temp was probably above 75 degrees. Lower 60's equals clean, crisp beer
     
    BaalDagon likes this.
  9. BaalDagon

    BaalDagon Initiate (0) Jul 17, 2014 Tennessee

    Need to know what DIPA means!?!?!?
     
  10. BaalDagon

    BaalDagon Initiate (0) Jul 17, 2014 Tennessee

    Again everyone, THANK YOU for your input! I will try this with my small, one gallon batch to see how things work... on top of that; NOTES, NOTES, NOTES!!!
     
  11. markdrinksbeer

    markdrinksbeer Initiate (0) Nov 14, 2013 Massachusetts

    Double IPA
     
  12. BaalDagon

    BaalDagon Initiate (0) Jul 17, 2014 Tennessee

    Thanks markdrinksbeer! Whats sad is that as I was drinking one, it dawned on me, HAHAHAAA!
     
    markdrinksbeer likes this.
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.