Adding coffee to a chocolate stout

Discussion in 'Homebrewing' started by jkn09, Dec 30, 2014.

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  1. jkn09

    jkn09 Aspirant (275) Oct 17, 2012 Texas

    I was in Austin last weekend for BBQ, so I swung by Austin Homebrew Supply while in town. I picked up a chocolate stout kit because it sounded good, but then I had the idea to add coffee to it. Any frame of reference on how much coffee to add to a roughly 5.1% chocolate stout? It's a 5 gal batch, but I may end up splitting it into 2 separate batches.
     
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  2. corbmoster

    corbmoster Initiate (191) Dec 15, 2014 Texas

    I am curious about this too....
     
  3. OldSock

    OldSock Zealot (582) Apr 3, 2005 District of Columbia
    Brewery

    I like ~2 oz of whole coffee beans directly in the beer for ~24 hours right before packaging. Start with less/shorter, taste and add more or extend as needed. Plenty of other options, but that is what as yielded the best and most persistent coffee character for me.
     
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  4. jkn09

    jkn09 Aspirant (275) Oct 17, 2012 Texas

    Great! Thanks for the quick answer. I forgot to mention it would be whole beans, but you answered that anyway. Thanks again.
     
  5. corbmoster

    corbmoster Initiate (191) Dec 15, 2014 Texas

    Really? Whole bean, not ground up or anything? I'm surprised. Good to know though.
     
  6. VikeMan

    VikeMan Poo-Bah (1,949) Jul 12, 2009 Pennsylvania
    Society

    I recently used 3 ounces of whole beans for 48 hours in 5 gallons of Oatmeal Stout (in the keg) just before carbonating. Coffee flavor/aroma level seems to be spot on.
     
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  7. jbakajust1

    jbakajust1 Crusader (736) Aug 25, 2009 Oregon

    I did 2oz of whole beans in the keg for nearly 72 hours in a Porter that turned out awesome.
     
  8. OldSock

    OldSock Zealot (582) Apr 3, 2005 District of Columbia
    Brewery

    You can do coarse-crushed, but I've found 12-24 hours can be enough. It just requires more vigilance.
     
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  9. Slatetank

    Slatetank Poo-Bah (5,442) Oct 9, 2006 Pennsylvania
    Society

    I used 2.5 oz of espresso (dry bean)in a gallon of imperial stout with a couple vanilla beans and the coffee flavor is intense, I wanted it to have a sort of mocha quality
     
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  10. GetMeAnIPA

    GetMeAnIPA Defender (649) Mar 28, 2009 California

    Do you just rack the beans out when you keg it? Using coffee beans like dry hopping?
     
  11. GetMeAnIPA

    GetMeAnIPA Defender (649) Mar 28, 2009 California

    Has anybody added cold pressed coffee?
     
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  12. jbakajust1

    jbakajust1 Crusader (736) Aug 25, 2009 Oregon

    I dropped the bag in suspended from the lid just like dry hops, and I removed the from the keg when the flavor reached what I wanted.

    As far as cold pressed, you are not just adding coffee, but diluting the beer with water. Beer (with alcohol and lower pH) is better at extracting the coffee than cold water anyways.
     
  13. GetMeAnIPA

    GetMeAnIPA Defender (649) Mar 28, 2009 California

    Thanks! I've been wanting to do a coffee chocolate stout and wasn't sure which way to go. First go around I'll just add the whole beans for 48 - 72 hours...thanks'
     
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  14. jbakajust1

    jbakajust1 Crusader (736) Aug 25, 2009 Oregon

    One thing to keep in mind if adding to a keg is that each time you taste it, the beer in the dip tube and beer line have not received more coffee flavor. Pour 2 tasters, the second one is where the coffee flavor/aroma is currently at. The first one is to drink and enjoy.
     
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  15. OldSock

    OldSock Zealot (582) Apr 3, 2005 District of Columbia
    Brewery

    Cold pressed is great for control/precision and time management, but I find the coffee flavor fades sooner than the dry beaning method.
     
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  16. devildogbrewing

    devildogbrewing Initiate (0) Dec 31, 2014 Michigan

    ive done ground coffee in a hop sock for 48 hours before bottling, not too over powering at all! I also transferred it to a secondary like when I do my dry hops
     
  17. MostlyNorwegian

    MostlyNorwegian Zealot (550) Feb 5, 2013 Illinois

    Steer clear of using hot brewed coffee altogether. You'll be losing the acids and presence by going that route.
    I've only done cold pressed. and it works wonders. I tend to steer clear of darker roasted beans and go to the middle, and to light roasts. They have more fruity snap.
    I'm curious now bout dry beaning though. Next darker ale that gets brewed is getting some.
     
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