Adding pineapple

Discussion in 'Homebrewing' started by Hop_it_up, Feb 23, 2017.

  1. Hop_it_up

    Hop_it_up Initiate (0) Feb 22, 2017 New York

    Im trying to improve my kettle soured session IPA recipe; the current recipe does have a nice pineapple character from the hops but it's not the bright flavor that the sour needs(IMO). I was thinking of adding pineapple. I'm looking for some advice from anyone who has experience working with pineapple from the amount and method they used and their result. Thanks in advance for taking the time to help
     
  2. machalel

    machalel Initiate (0) Jan 19, 2012 Australia

    I have used pinapple before, but not in a beer as such. From my experience & what I have read, it is difficult to get a fresh pinapple flavour accross, and most of what you get is acid.

    That being said, I'm sure someone has done it successfully!
     
  3. CADETS3

    CADETS3 Initiate (165) Dec 3, 2014 Texas

    I have used organic pineapple juice before, and it's worked phenomenally.
     
  4. VikeMan

    VikeMan Meyvn (1,470) Jul 12, 2009 Pennsylvania

    I used 5 lbs of frozen/thawed pineapple and 5 lbs of frozen/thawed blueberries in 5 gallons of Berliner Weiss. I racked the beer onto the fruit in a secondary. The pineapple was noticeable but subtle. If I were to do it again, I'd probably increase the fruit to 6 lbs each.

    If you decide to do fruit in the secondary, ignore the usual advice to eliminate/minimize headspace, because the sugars in the fruit will ferment.
     
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  5. SFACRKnight

    SFACRKnight Meyvn (1,245) Jan 20, 2012 Colorado

    I have always wanted to use carmelized pineapple in a beer but could never decide on a style to use it in. Keep us posted on your progress, I'm keen to hear how things turn out.
     
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  6. donspublic

    donspublic Poo-Bah (1,609) Aug 4, 2014 Texas
    Premium Trader

    Good point there. I am not much of a pineapple guy, eating it straight up, but I like how it comes across in a beer. But when I caramelize it for taco's al pastor, man it takes it to another dimension, plus it seems to lose that biting acidity that exists in it's raw state. Maybe a hoppy brown depending on how the caramelization comes across?
     
  7. Hop_it_up

    Hop_it_up Initiate (0) Feb 22, 2017 New York

    Thanks for all the input.

    Vikeman - do you recall how big your Berliner wiess was and did you test your ph on that by any chance? The reason I ask is i think I'm going to go with your method of racking on top of the pineapple and want to get an idea how much I'll need based on my stats. Also, how long did you let it in the secondary to insure that secondary fermentation from the pineapple was complete?
     
  8. Hop_it_up

    Hop_it_up Initiate (0) Feb 22, 2017 New York

    Just based on my own preference for a sour I most likely not going to caramelize the pineapple because I want it to have a dry finish. However, I certainly will be keeping you updated on this one.
     
  9. atomeyes

    atomeyes Aspirant (292) Jul 13, 2011 Ontario (Canada)

    pineapple juice after boil
     
  10. VikeMan

    VikeMan Meyvn (1,470) Jul 12, 2009 Pennsylvania

    It ended up around 3.5%. I didn't measure the pH, except going into the sour worting vessel. At that point it was 4.8.

    But when the sour worting was done, I would describe level of souring as medium-ish for a Berliner. Quite noticeable, but not in-your-face sour.
     
  11. Lukass

    Lukass Savant (935) Dec 16, 2012 Ohio

    Thanks for starting this thread, as I am planning on secondarying a Berliner on pineapple soon. You're one step ahead of me, so let us know how it goes! Not that it really matters since I have no experience with this yet, but my plan is to chop up two whole pineapples and purée with an immersion blender. Adding to secondary fermenter before racking the beer onto it.

    As far as how long to keep your beer on the pineapple.. if you're not using brett I would say 1 month is a safe amount of time. As long as gravity is stable.
     
  12. Mothergoose03

    Mothergoose03 Poo-Bah (2,260) May 30, 2005 Michigan
    Premium

    I'll throw a though into this conversation: Seems to me that when I buy a fresh pineapple for consusmption, it's very difficult to get one that is fully ripened and sweet with a full pineapple flavor. If they are too young, they are overly sour/tart so that the pineapple flavor is masked, but maybe for a sour ale, that's what you want. My point is that you need to ask yourself what ripeness of a pineapple do you want. I don't buy them often enough to know that a tart one will ripen on its own if left sitting in the kitchen, but you may need to research that. Then when you go to buy a pineapple to put into a beer, maybe you need to plan ahead to get the one that you want if it needs time to ripen.

    Or you can use canned/frozen pineapple. They are always sweet.
     
  13. donspublic

    donspublic Poo-Bah (1,609) Aug 4, 2014 Texas
    Premium Trader

    I think the test for ripeness is if the leaves on the top pull away easily, that is usually my first test. If I am buying one for cutting up and putting in the fridge for the wife, that is usually the way I go. If I am going to cook with it, I will look for one that is somewhat starting to show softness on the bottom, there will be more trimming to be done, but it is going to have a lot more sweetness vs tartness
     
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  14. minderbender

    minderbender Initiate (187) Jan 18, 2009 New York

    I think this topic was covered in a recent episode of The Sour Hour on the Brewing Network. The discussion starts right around the 21:30 mark (this is Episode 51).
     
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  15. jmarsh123

    jmarsh123 Initiate (0) Mar 31, 2010 Indiana

    I did a sour with pineapple and while it turned out well, the acidity was extremely high.. I split a 10 gallon batch between pineapple and black raspberry and the br was very restrained on sourness, so I'm attributing the different acidity levels to the pineapple itself.

    I used 9 lbs of whole pineapples, cut up and put in secondary. I used the remaining juices from cutting in another sour with orange peel that turned out more subtle.
     
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  16. Hop_it_up

    Hop_it_up Initiate (0) Feb 22, 2017 New York

    Ok, so for those interested in this discussion;
    So since I couldn't make a singular decision I decided to make 6 gallons and split the bach in half to test both methods; Adding juice and adding the real pineapple. The batch and controls of the experiment are as followed;

    Control- 6.0 gallons of Kettle Soured Pineapple session IPA using omega 605 to sour and WY London Ale III to ferment. Beer was fermented in the primary for 4 days and racked while still active to ensure immediate secondary fermentation. Both beers will be left in the secondary for 14 days and receive the same 2 step dry hop schedule, the first with 8 days remaining the the secondary and the second with 3 days

    Batch 1) 3.0 gallons racked on top 3.5 lbs of ripe puréed pineapple on 2/28/17 - glass carboy

    Batch 2) 3.0 gallons with .25 gallons (1 bottle) of K.W. Knudsen organic pure pineapple juice on 2/28/17 - glass carboy

    I will update progress as needed.
     
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  17. machalel

    machalel Initiate (0) Jan 19, 2012 Australia

    Keen to hear how it goes :slight_smile:
     
  18. lic217

    lic217 Champion (826) Aug 10, 2010 Connecticut
    Trader

    I put the pineapple cores and any uneaten pineapple (after a couple days in my fridge) into my freezer, then into my sours when i am ready to add fruit. I have only tasted one finished sour and I put in at about 1lb per gallon. I think the cores have a real interesting pineapple flavor that goes great in the beer. I really like it. I currently have another fermenting now and more pineapple in the freezer for another batch.
     
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  19. GreenKrusty101

    GreenKrusty101 Crusader (730) Dec 4, 2008 Nevada

    Just turn it upside down to ripen
     
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  20. Hop_it_up

    Hop_it_up Initiate (0) Feb 22, 2017 New York

    Update.....

    While adding first round of dry hops, Both batch 1 (3.5 lbs puréed pineapple) and batch 2 (.25 gallon pineapple juice) have lost lost most of their original pineapple aroma. Upon taking a sample prior to the dry hop, looks like batch 1 has preserved more of a fresh pineapple flavor, though subtle. Batch 2 also has a subtle pineapple flavor but I also preceived it to have an increased "hotness" which I am assuhming has been caused by the juice having more simple and easily fermentable sugars. At this point, I believe I can not make a fair judgement since the hotness in batch 2 is affecting the perceived pineapple flavor.

    More updates to come.
     
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  21. VikeMan

    VikeMan Meyvn (1,470) Jul 12, 2009 Pennsylvania

    The juice you used doesn't have any added sugar. So unless the pineapples that went into that juice were riper than the pineapples you puréed, the proportions of sugars (per unit of actual pineapple content) should have been about the same.

    Did you happen to do the math to figure out whether 3.5 lbs of pineapple was contributing more or less total sugar than a gallon of that juice? Then there's the differences in dilution of the beer due to the water in the pineapples and the water in the juice.
     
  22. Hop_it_up

    Hop_it_up Initiate (0) Feb 22, 2017 New York

    Did you happen to do the math to figure out whether 3.5 lbs of pineapple was contributing more or less total sugar than a gallon of that juice? Then there's the differences in dilution of the beer due to the water in the pineapples and the water in the juice.[/QUOTE]

    I am unaware of the formula that would calculate that for me. However I understand that I am unable to use its gravity reading to determine the added sugar from the pureed pineapple due to the organic material causing false increase in wort density. That being said, If you know this formula, I would love to have it for future references.
     
  23. VikeMan

    VikeMan Meyvn (1,470) Jul 12, 2009 Pennsylvania

    You can just google "pineapple sugar content" or something like that to get find the sugar in grams per grams of pineapple. For the juice, just look on the back of the can.
     
  24. Hop_it_up

    Hop_it_up Initiate (0) Feb 22, 2017 New York

    I didn't even think of doing that and though the sugar content of the real pineapple will vary, I at least can get ballpark.
     
  25. Prep8611

    Prep8611 Aspirant (250) Aug 22, 2014 New Jersey

    Resurrecting this thread. Want to add pineapple to a cream ale which was just pilsner, corn, rice. Would you guys recommending adding fresh froZen cut pineapple to secondary? My other thought was cooking the pineapple to help get rid of some of the acidity and adding lactose to help make the fruit shine more/cut tartness.
    @VikeMan
     
  26. VikeMan

    VikeMan Meyvn (1,470) Jul 12, 2009 Pennsylvania

    That's what I'd do. But thaw the frozen pineapple and "smush" it up somehow.

    I don't know that cooking the pineapple would actually reduce acidity. But it would probably denature the enzyme in pineapple that eats proteins. As I understand it, it's that enzyme that causes the "burn" people experience with pineapple. Regarding lactose, if you want to add some sweetness to mask some sourness, that would certainly work to some extent.
     
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  27. Prep8611

    Prep8611 Aspirant (250) Aug 22, 2014 New Jersey

    I bought fresh pineapple today so I’m prolly gonna try cooking the pineapple then pureeing with lactose then freezing so that I can add frozen cubes to secondary. I’m thinking 1/2 pound lactose for 5 gallons... too much or too little?
     
  28. VikeMan

    VikeMan Meyvn (1,470) Jul 12, 2009 Pennsylvania

    I've never used it for exactly the purpose you're contemplating, but 1/2 lb seems like a safe place to start experimenting. Also, I've never added lactose in secondary that I can recall. I'm not sure how soluble it will be that way. Not saying it wouldn't work. I just don't know.
     
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  29. Prep8611

    Prep8611 Aspirant (250) Aug 22, 2014 New Jersey

    My guess is that if I cook the pineapple down with lactose then purée that the yeast will mix it all around while fermenting in secondary. Not sure but I guess no time like the present to try it out.
     
    #29 Prep8611, May 20, 2018
    Last edited: May 20, 2018
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  30. MrOH

    MrOH Champion (848) Jul 5, 2010 Maryland

    I'd suggest grilling or searing the pineapple to caramelize the sugars a little, just to add a little more complexity
     
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  31. machalel

    machalel Initiate (0) Jan 19, 2012 Australia

    I've done this in another beverage and it worked well. I think it would also work in a beer. :slight_smile:
     
  32. Prep8611

    Prep8611 Aspirant (250) Aug 22, 2014 New Jersey

    Resurrecting this thread one more time. The pineapple and lactose I cooked and froze in loaf pans and added to secondary is fucking killer. So light and refreshing and honestly brewery quality. Mission pineapple cream ale with lactose is a sucess.
     
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