Adjunct Misinformation

Discussion in 'Beer Talk' started by mambossa, Dec 2, 2019.

  1. mambossa

    mambossa Disciple (394) Jun 30, 2015 Ohio
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    [​IMG]

    Seriously...this brewery (Platform Brewing) does this labeling with all their beers. I’m not usually annoyed by many things, but this shit...c’mon.

    None of those are adjuncts.

    Also, Snickerdoodle what? The literal cookie? Spices? But the beer is called “Holiday Donut Cookie”? And it just tastes like solvent and misplaced flavors.

    Im the most easygoing dude you’d ever meet, I’m rarely phased or triggered by things...but for some reason this amount of misinformation irks me.

    Anyone else have any experiences like this?
     
  2. rozzom

    rozzom Champion (852) Jan 22, 2011 New York
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    Both the use of the word “adjunct” and then what’s listed below it are par for the course these days
     
  3. HorseheadsHophead

    HorseheadsHophead Poo-Bah (1,752) Sep 15, 2014 New York

    Yes, sadly, even breweries have begun embracing the incorrect usage of the word "adjuncts" because they know their fans do it and they're playing along for the $$$. It drives me nuts.
    But what really makes me sad about all of this is that nobody would even know what the word "adjunct" was if it wasn't for the correct meaning of the word. But now that people are picking up on it, it's only because it's being used incorrectly. The level of irony is ridiculous.
     
  4. Warwick7

    Warwick7 Initiate (72) May 25, 2019 Maryland

    The correct term for adjunct is Malt subsitute right? Ie corn or rice.
     
  5. TrojanRB

    TrojanRB Meyvn (1,488) Jul 27, 2013 California
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    Adjuncts are malt (barley) supplements (ex: corn, rice, etc...)

    What are the ingredients they listed (vanilla, nutmeg, cinnamon, etc....) called? Just spices? Or is there a more technical term?

    I don’t even know a polite word for how I’d describe snickerdoodles as an ingredient.
     
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  6. bubseymour

    bubseymour Poo-Bah (2,552) Oct 30, 2010 Maryland
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    I think the can info. is helpful. No need to get hung up on the title Adjunct. It’s basically just “other” ingredients added to the beer. I’m guessing Snickerdoodle is the cookie as well.
     
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  7. bbtkd

    bbtkd Poo-Bah (2,879) Sep 20, 2015 South Dakota
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    Drekker does something similar but categorizes them as Malts, Hops, Flora, and Gimmicks. Love it.

    I agree that the contents Platform lists are not adjuncts by strict brewing terms, so I call them add-junks. I love me some add-junks.
     
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  8. rgordon

    rgordon Savant (994) Apr 26, 2012 North Carolina

    Yes. The adjunct is really not part of the whole, but relatively associated. It is the most pure form of detached connection.
     
  9. PapaGoose03

    PapaGoose03 Poo-Bah (2,532) May 30, 2005 Michigan
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    Note: My bolding above. Wasn't Platform purchased by AB-InBev earlier this year? If so, it doesn't sound like there is any QC oversight occurring.
     
  10. sharpski

    sharpski Meyvn (1,156) Oct 11, 2010 Oregon
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    I highly doubt ABI is concerned with the layout of Platform’s labels or the wording adhering to anybody’s opinion of the definition of “adjunct” being consistent with tradition. A quick review of the breweries owned by them reveals there is no effort to standardize labeling.
     
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  11. PapaGoose03

    PapaGoose03 Poo-Bah (2,532) May 30, 2005 Michigan
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    No, I'm not talking about the labeling, I was referring to the solvent-like taste to the beer that mambossa mentioned in the part that I bolded from that post.
     
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  12. bbtkd

    bbtkd Poo-Bah (2,879) Sep 20, 2015 South Dakota
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    Kudos to them for not trying to bud-ize everything :smirk:
     
  13. scream

    scream Meyvn (1,216) Dec 6, 2014 Wisconsin
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    How this is perceived is all about how one defines the term "adjunct", is it a supplement of whatever kind or a fermenting sugar of some sort. Seems to me to be of litttle concern. I would be concerned about whether I liked the beer or not more than anything else.
     
  14. sharpski

    sharpski Meyvn (1,156) Oct 11, 2010 Oregon
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    Not seeing your previous post with bolding. It seems others aren’t either.
     
  15. Rekrule

    Rekrule Defender (643) Nov 11, 2011 Massachusetts

    That's how the majority of people who drink craft beer use the term. Language changes. Move with it or get left behind.

    We can labcoat and circle jerk all day over semantics but that doesn't push the culture forward at all. Tons of words, in beer alone, are used incorrectly or are used so much they have lost meaning.
     
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  16. jasonmason

    jasonmason Initiate (181) Oct 6, 2004 California

    I think this is a shining example of the difference between adjunct and “add junk”.
     
  17. unlikelyspiderperson

    unlikelyspiderperson Meyvn (1,097) Mar 12, 2013 California
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    the real question is when are we going to see these AAL (American Adjunct Lager) brewers get with the times and start throwing yuzu, white yams, and cacao in a budweiser?
     
  18. Rekrule

    Rekrule Defender (643) Nov 11, 2011 Massachusetts

    When the mass sales are there to warrant a copycat. Bud black lager aged on JB staves is at least a stab at something they have a sense there is a big market for. The yuzu yam cocoa milkshake sours, at least for now, are for the IPA drinkers who want to pretend like they drink an array of styles.
     
  19. CheapHysterics

    CheapHysterics Aspirant (230) Apr 1, 2009 Pennsylvania

    I often get a taste that is reminiscent of solvents from holiday spiced beers (and many pumpkin beers). Not from every spiced beer, but enough that it makes me super wary of beers with cinnamon/ginger/nutmeg, etc. However, those are all spices I enjoy cooking and baking with.
     
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  20. SFACRKnight

    SFACRKnight Meyvn (1,361) Jan 20, 2012 Colorado
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    Get with the times or get left behind, right?
     
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  21. marquis

    marquis Crusader (792) Nov 20, 2005 United Kingdom (England)

    The original meaning of adjunct was a substance which yields fermentable sugars only by means of the excess enzymes in the malt. Unmalted Barley, wheat, potato starch etc. Rice was added by Budweiser to mop up excess enzymes present in lower grade barley malt and allow domestic barley to be used.
    Yes, language does change and one reason why there is so much misunderstanding about brewing history is not realising that people in the past had different meanings for many terms.
    The problem with loose use of jargon though is that it is there for a purpose, what now do you call an additive used to utilise and mop up malt enzymes?
     
  22. jesskidden

    jesskidden Poo-Bah (1,882) Aug 10, 2005 New Jersey
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    I see it - in his quote of mambossa's OP he bolded the words:
    Although, probably would have been better to delete the rest of the post or used underlining as well as bolding. :grin:

    Well, many would prefer to continue to use the term how the US brewing industry has traditionally defined it. Commonly understood and accepted definitions helps with communication - it doesn't hinder it. Everyone having their own definition...well... :slight_frown:

    I thought snickerdoodle was a crossbreed of dog - half Belgian Schipperke and half poodle? I guess that could be an "adjunct" but seems more likely to be an "allegen", too.
     
  23. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (4,251) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
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    A number of the 'extra' ingredients thrown into that beer would be classified as spices as you noted. Also stuff like oranges, limes, etc. would be classified as being flavorings.

    An item on that list of stuff that could be classified as being a brewing adjunct is milk sugar.

    Cheers!
     
  24. rozzom

    rozzom Champion (852) Jan 22, 2011 New York
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    I thought milk sugar was just used for body/mouthfeel; that it wasn’t fermentable? That was just based on what a home brewing friend told me though. I’m far from an expert myself so could be totally off base.
     
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  25. Junior

    Junior Defender (634) May 23, 2015 Michigan
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    Can’t we agree to use a term like ‘flavor additives’?
     
  26. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (4,251) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
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    Good catch. I was under the impression that some of the milk sugar would be fermented (with some residual left) but you are correct: milk sugar (lactose) is not fermentable by brewers yeast.

    Cheers!
     
  27. jesskidden

    jesskidden Poo-Bah (1,882) Aug 10, 2005 New Jersey
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    I think for many, the word "additive" in itself has a negative connotation*, the Feds just call 'em "Exempt Ingredients" (exempt, that is, from the old recipe pre-approval regulation) in Ruling 2015-1, so I'd just say they're "flavoring ingredients".

    * Of course, speaking of "negative connotation" --- why I remember when the word "adjunct" had it. Who'da thunk it's rep would so quickly do a 180°?

    Well, as noted by @rozzom that one might be controversial... but, along with other fruits and vegetables and sugar sources (molasses, maple syrup...) that do add some sugar/carbohydrate material are they really "malt adjuncts" in the sense that they're added to the recipe supplement the total fermentable material from barley malt and traditional adjuncts? Or is that just a small side factor in their usage, which is primarily flavoring?
     
  28. officerbill

    officerbill Disciple (393) Feb 9, 2019 New York
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  29. ManBearPat

    ManBearPat Devotee (472) Dec 2, 2014 Colorado

    ITT: a bunch of olds who don't/can't acknowledge that language changes. If it didn't- why are there different languages?
     
  30. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (4,251) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
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    Well, in order to properly respond here we will need to get 'into the weeds'. Lactose (milk sugar) does indeed add sugar/carbohydrate to the wort. The 'issue' with lactose is that brewers yeast lacks lactase enzyme and consequently can not break down this sugar into fermentable sugars (e.g., glucose). So the addition of lactose will add to the OG (Original Gravity) of the wort but it will remain in the resulting beer (the beer will have a 'higher' Final Gravity). Since lactose is not fermented during primary fermentation it really is not a adjunct.

    The lactose will add qualities to the resulting beer:
    • With a 'higher' final gravity the beer will have more body (a fuller mouthfeel)
    • There will be some sweetness but lactose (milk sugar) is not a sweet sugar in comparison to other sugars like sucrose, glucose,...
    Cheers!
     
  31. rozzom

    rozzom Champion (852) Jan 22, 2011 New York
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    At our semi-regular BA Other Half Brewing meet up a couple weeks ago, @RobNewton (the home brewer i mentioned above) brought in a bag of lactose to try. Like I said I am far from an expert - maybe during the process some sweetness becomes apparent. But trying the stuff straight from the bag it was negligibly sweet. Like on a 100 point scale maybe a 2?
     
  32. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (4,251) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
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    I have never used lactose in my brewing practice so I have no personal experience here. From my readings lactose is not a sweet sugar in comparison to 'common' sugars like sucrose, glucose,... I will take your word for it that is has a 'sweetness factor' of 2 on a 100 point scale.

    Will the value be greater than 2 in the resulting beer? You got me here.

    Cheers!
     
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  33. StoutSnob40

    StoutSnob40 Poo-Bah (2,208) Jan 4, 2013 California
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    I usually just said "additives".. But might just go with "bonus shit" from now on.
     
  34. rozzom

    rozzom Champion (852) Jan 22, 2011 New York
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    Well before adjunct started getting misused people used to say (and still do) “fruited sour” for example. Could we say “junk-fooded stout”?
     
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  35. SFACRKnight

    SFACRKnight Meyvn (1,361) Jan 20, 2012 Colorado
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    This why brewers should use latin to describe their beers. Dead languages don't change.
     
  36. rgordon

    rgordon Savant (994) Apr 26, 2012 North Carolina

    So, is lactose simply used to turbidify a beer, or are there other intentions? I've had some very nice milk stouts, but I am really uninitiated on the value of this sugar in beer.
     
  37. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (4,251) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
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    For the case of a beer style like a Milk Stout the principle purpose of utilizing lactose (milk sugar) is to add body to the beer.

    Cheers!
     
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  38. rgordon

    rgordon Savant (994) Apr 26, 2012 North Carolina

    What other attributes may lactose lend to other beer styles? Conceptually, the addition of lactose has never appealed to me. But I am not a brewer (yet).
     
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  39. bbtkd

    bbtkd Poo-Bah (2,879) Sep 20, 2015 South Dakota
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    That works but sounds more clinical and not as much fun as "add-junks", "stuff", or "gimmicks" :wink:
     
  40. SFACRKnight

    SFACRKnight Meyvn (1,361) Jan 20, 2012 Colorado
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    I am going with bonus shit as coined by @StoutSnob40