Beer cellar and divorce

Discussion in 'Cellaring / Aging Beer' started by not2quick, Nov 3, 2019.

  1. not2quick

    not2quick Devotee (417) Dec 1, 2015 Missouri
    Society Trader

    I was thinking the other day and was curious if this has ever happened to anyone? If the significant other was aware of the value their partners beer/wine/spirits are worth, would they go after that in a divorce settlement? I can see grown men and women pleading with tears in their eyes to take the car or take the airline miles, but please don't touch my KBBS vert/40 yr old Bordeaux/ Pappy 23/etc.
     
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  2. dennis3951

    dennis3951 Savant (932) Mar 6, 2008 New Jersey

    Beer is not worth enough to fight over. Many people have wine cellars that are worth well over $50,000 that is worth fighting over.
     
  3. Beer_Economicus

    Beer_Economicus Zealot (519) Apr 8, 2017 Indiana
    Trader

    Just to add to this:

    Wine and Spirits have markets that exist in the real world, whereas beer does not. To be explicitly clear: stores actually sell wine and spirits, and you can look up what bottle X of Y vintage has sold for (whether from a store or an auction), or is currently selling for from a retailer/cellar store. The analogue does not exist for beer. Everyone that sells beer is doing so illegally, and the websites that exist to sell beer also operate illegally (as far as I know).

    So, from a legal standpoint, even if you had 10 cases of BBT, Derivations, KBBS, etc., what could you point to for value? Nothing legal. Your only argument would be sentimental value.

    Compare this to the wine and spirits world, where it is easy for a small collection to be worth thousands or tens of thousands of dollars with the right set of bottles, and it’s easy to see why someone would fight over the VALUE.
     
  4. beernuts

    beernuts Disciple (335) Jan 23, 2014 Virginia
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    Why would it be legal to sell wine and spirits but not beer?
     
  5. unlikelyspiderperson

    unlikelyspiderperson Meyvn (1,088) Mar 12, 2013 California
    Society Trader

    I think the markets being referred to are legal secondary markets where vintage wines and liquors are auctioned. Id imagine the same entities could also deal in beer but don't because of lack of demand.
     
  6. Beer_Economicus

    Beer_Economicus Zealot (519) Apr 8, 2017 Indiana
    Trader

    Mostly this:

    There’s are stores that have liquor licenses that sell wine and spirits “secondary.” Note that this refers to price, but original owner only. I believe Kentucky is the only state that has enacted a “vintage spirit” law that allows retailers with a license to buy a vintage spirit from someone, and then sell it to someone else. I don’t think that is legal anywhere for wine either. However, auctions from various auction houses are, obviously, legal.

    I know of NO such store that sells cellared beer on the “secondary”. I don’t believe it is legal to purchase from someone or to hook a buyer up with a seller (although the seller does not have a license either), and i know of no such store that has cellared beers just to sell later at a high markup. Craft beer King’s And the such not withstanding, since they get only very limited (widely distributed) options, all things considered.
     
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  7. zid

    zid Meyvn (1,346) Feb 15, 2010 New York
    Society Trader

    @cavedave - I seem to remember you having a relatable story.
     
  8. cavedave

    cavedave Poo-Bah (2,605) Mar 12, 2009 New York
    Trader

    Indeed. Anyone wondering if beer cellars are open to being listed on the assets, they can. Ex #2 used mine (much larger back then) as bargaining chip. She ended up getting the generator and electric fence, which I'd negotiated early on to keep, and I kept the beer.

    I ended up pissed off from her/her lawyer's tactics and instructed my lawyer to change my offer at the last minute for her half of the house by $5,000.00 less than we had "agreed" on, which was nasty, I know, and forced her to accept as I knew it would due to her financial commitments. But, hey, she went after my beer! This is why, yes, you can go after partner's beer cellar, but it might not be such a good idea.
     
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  9. unlikelyspiderperson

    unlikelyspiderperson Meyvn (1,088) Mar 12, 2013 California
    Society Trader

    how did they value the beer? was it just retail?
     
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  10. cavedave

    cavedave Poo-Bah (2,605) Mar 12, 2009 New York
    Trader

    Glad we didn't have to fight that battle. She didn't think to value it because she was going to keep all the wines, few of which were valuable, and didn't realize my beer was worth anything until well along in the process, let alone much more than her wines. I traded keeping my beer for letting go a generator we'd paid 2100.00 and the electric fence electronics and connectors (I kept the buried wires) which was probably 1,000.00. I think if she would have paid someone to do a valid estimate I would have done much worse. I figure it would have been fairly valued at about 7K at that time.
     
    #11 cavedave, Nov 13, 2019
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2019
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  11. Beer_Economicus

    Beer_Economicus Zealot (519) Apr 8, 2017 Indiana
    Trader

    What is that value based on, though? Retail?

    Legally, I'm still not sure how a court could accept anything but retail value for beer, since no one sells cellared beer (legally) at secondary valuations. Pointing to Facebook or another site that illegally has people selling from one person to the other just doesn't seem like it would work
     
  12. jpm05401

    jpm05401 Initiate (79) May 1, 2013 Vermont
    Trader

    Skinner Auction house sells and appraises beer. They could also point to charity auctions.
     
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