Breweries Increasingly Commit to Sourcing Local Malts

Discussion in 'Article Comments' started by BeerAdvocate, Aug 8, 2017.

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  1. BeerAdvocate

    BeerAdvocate Admin (4,017) Aug 23, 1996 Finland
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  2. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Grand Pooh-Bah (3,181) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
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  3. Keene

    Keene Initiate (0) Sep 11, 2009 Washington

  4. hopfenunmaltz

    hopfenunmaltz Pooh-Bah (2,611) Jun 8, 2005 Michigan
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  5. SoilLady

    SoilLady Initiate (0) Nov 26, 2016 Oregon

  6. Roadkizzle

    Roadkizzle Initiate (0) Nov 6, 2007 Texas

    My closest LHBS that I try to buy most of my malt from doesn't really specify where each malt is from and don't have craft maltsters.

    The other two Texas LHBS that I buy online or drive out to each stock malt from a different local maltster. One in North Texas and one in Central Texas.

    Although it's only 1-2 base malts though.
     
  7. dennis3951

    dennis3951 Initiate (0) Mar 6, 2008 New Jersey

    When you say local malt does that mean the barley malted is grown local? or just malted local?
     
  8. hopfenunmaltz

    hopfenunmaltz Pooh-Bah (2,611) Jun 8, 2005 Michigan
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    Local farmers are contracted to grow malting barley for the local Maltsters. That is true for Pilot in MI, Valley Malt in MA, Double Eagle in PA, and Mecca Grade in OR. Note that barley can grow in those areas.

    Some of the Maltsters in the east have to reject more malt due to DON being above the limit. DON is a mycotoxin produced by Fusarium, a fungus, and it is more of a problem in humid and wet areas, though it is everywhere. DON is also known as Vomit toxin.
     
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  9. dennis3951

    dennis3951 Initiate (0) Mar 6, 2008 New Jersey

    Thanks, local can mean a number of things when it comes to beer. When I say local I mean it was brewed close by.
     
  10. ElijahSF

    ElijahSF Initiate (0) Aug 30, 2013 California

    "Locally, Admiral Maltings is the first of its kind — not just in Alameda, but in all of California. It is the new project from well-known Bay Area brewers Ron Silberstein (Thirsty Bear) and Dave McLean (Magnolia), with investment from Sierra Nevada founder Ken Grossman."\\

    Imagine that, Dave McLean, former owner of Magnolia Brewing starting a business with the founder of Sierra Nevada, maybe just maybe his brewery and name does have some iconic association to the nations beer community.
     
  11. Keene

    Keene Initiate (0) Sep 11, 2009 Washington

    Good point. We covered the Admiral news in our March issue.
     
  12. marquis

    marquis Pooh-Bah (2,301) Nov 20, 2005 England
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    Problem is that very few places are ideal for growing malting barley.I see signs on fields in East Anglia boasting "Maris Otter for XXX Brewery" , places where the climate ( maritime conditions and high latitude giving long daylight hours) and soil are perfect.. Yet my cousin farms only a few dozen miles away and can only grow feed barley.
     
  13. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Grand Pooh-Bah (3,181) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
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    Malting barley grows well in much of the US. Whether a farmer chooses to grow malting barley vs. other crops is a choice of economics (i.e., will they make more money growing other crops).

    Below is a link to a good write-up entitled “Malting Barley in Pennsylvania”.

    An extract from that write-up:

    “Malting barley is a specific type of barley that differs from the feed barley commonly grown in the state. With the rapid growth of craft beer production, a demand for locally sourced malted barley has led to the development of malt houses in Pennsylvania and other states in our region.”

    “History

    Malting barley was introduced to the United States by the Dutch, English, and French during the time of European settlement and became an important crop for both animal feed and its use in the production of beer. Barley production and malt houses were common in colonial Pennsylvania. Its use in beer production drove malting barley from the East Coast farther west. At one time, malting barley was grown in much of the Corn Belt region; yet, as the prices of corn and soybean rose, malting and feed barley was phased out of production. In Pennsylvania, feed barley production has continued to the present.”

    Cheers!

    http://extension.psu.edu/plants/crops/grains/small/production/malting-barley
     
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